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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 744

post #11146 of 13796

Want to see a designer version of the air rifle competition leather jackets and shoes

 

They already make fencing jackets, so why not?

 

post #11147 of 13796
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Their NYC store opening landed them two NYT stories and a BoF feature. There may have been more, but that's at least what I caught.

The 8,400 square foot space was also five stories high, so a lot more space than the actual square footage suggests.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/10/fashion/clothing-retailer-totokaelo-has-high-hopes-for-manhattan-fashion-week.html?_r=0

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/24/fashion/comfort-is-style-at-totokaelos-soho-store.html

https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/intelligence/how-totokaelos-jill-wenger-transformed-a-local-boutique-into-a-retailer-with-global-aspirations

It's a lot of space for any store.  Staffing that big of a store, alone, is a huge money sink.  I can understand that need for a storefront, but I think that operations like Carson Street show that PR does not really drive sales.  It's a way to get people to notice the store, but not to drop consistent money at it.

 

Prospecting for customer's is just the first part of any sale.  Closing the first sale successfully and to the satisfaction of the customer is the next step, and then it takes old school "black book" personal reachouts to keep them coming back.  Things like Styleforum are a good way of keeping that customer engaged in what is going on with a store and generate word of mouth publicity, which is also critical.  I think that a very well developed facebook page or reddit page could potentially do the same thing.  But I really think that social media is better for prospecting, generally.  

 

I think a major dilemma facing retail is that while retailing is moving consistently online, retailers have yet to figure out ways to perform all of the functions that were developed to run successful B&M businesses over a much longer time of trial-and-error.  

 

If you had a store in a good location - consistently having good window displays and friendly draw-ins as well as reachouts to both new and regular customers were obvious things to do.  And if I'm gone in the summer, I come back in the fall, and even if I hadn't thought about a store in forever, I will pass it on the street.  For online stores, I regular forget that they ever even existed.  And how can I refind anything when there is no street for me to walk down?

post #11148 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I use Denim Therapy and like them. Used SE once and they didn't back the repair area with reinforcement, which meant new holes showed up six months later. Maybe it was just that repair job though (they may back other jobs, I don't know).

As you prob know, SE only takes walk-ins (no mail ins). And the woman who used to do their repairs recently started her own repair business, Indigo Proof.

Denim Therapy takes mail-ins and backs repairs with a strong fabric. Denim Surgeon does the same and I think they finish their fabrics with an overlock stitch, so that it doesn't unravel (although, my Denim Therapy repairs never have). A nice finishing touch.

Definitely recommended. My darned jeans last so much longer. Wearing a pair of recently repaired Stevenson jeans right now, actually.

HTC / Denim Doctors repair was backed; SE repair wasn't but they did a surprisingly good job of matching the thickness of the original (22 oz) denim, which is impressive in and of itself.

I'm looking forward to seeing what Railcar comes back with. I've had them taper a couple of pairs of jeans and was happy with the results, so I'd expect good things from their repair services.

Checked my
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-Galt View Post

May the HTM gods reveal their grace 

Turned out it was only a couple of drops. Both the shoes and I survived relatively unscathed.
post #11149 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by nahneun View Post

if you mean the one on greene street in soho, i think it's still open

SF.
post #11150 of 13796
post #11151 of 13796

May be irrelevant, but Totokaelo always has a bunch of stuff left over after every season that they couldn't give away. Their labels seem fine for making money, but the individual pieces look like the buyer just picked out one of everything without knowing what they were looking at. They also style every designer in the same bland/minimal way that makes them indistinguishable.

 

It seems much better, in general, for retailers to offer fewer choices but with a deep inventory. Every season the same pieces sell out no matter what while the rest hit sales. I don't know how it works behind the scenes but it would make sense that betting on a few pieces is always better than getting one of everything or betting on labels as a whole.

post #11152 of 13796
Ha ha. If buyers knew which pieces will sell best, believe me they would buy just those. It's impossible to know. Every season proves us wrong on what may or may not sell well.
post #11153 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Ha ha. If buyers knew which pieces will sell best, believe me they would buy just those. It's impossible to know. Every season proves us wrong on what may or may not sell well.

I think with "collection" type brands this is especially true. One year we can go really conservative on styling and get a ton of feedback, buy into that feedback and - as you might guess - people's sensibilities change in the 7 months it takes to go from order to delivery.

This can even translate to basics; sell a ton of oxfords one year, double down the next, but then everyone you know already has an oxford! Lucky for us flannel shirts always sell out so we can at least depend on that being a constant (knock on wood, of course).
post #11154 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

Ha ha. If buyers knew which pieces will sell best, believe me they would buy just those. It's impossible to know. Every season proves us wrong on what may or may not sell well.

I think it's the same in every fields. Just see the big investment funds who sometimes have insanely low ROI's on what seemed like obvious investments.
post #11155 of 13796
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Portland Dry Goods View Post

I think with "collection" type brands this is especially true. One year we can go really conservative on styling and get a ton of feedback, buy into that feedback and - as you might guess - people's sensibilities change in the 7 months it takes to go from order to delivery.

This can even translate to basics; sell a ton of oxfords one year, double down the next, but then everyone you know already has an oxford! Lucky for us flannel shirts always sell out so we can at least depend on that being a constant (knock on wood, of course).

I've never seen a good study of how consumer behavior varies from season to season - whether a season of basics will be followed by a more adventurous pieces - a season of shirts and pants followed by a season of outerwear, or whatever.  Not even sure there is enough data and enough controls to do such a study with any decent accuracy, but it would be interesting to see.  I wonder if stores like Walmart, or Amazon, which are now data companies as well as retailers, are doing this internally, with small armies of data scientists, and whether they have found much that is actionable.

post #11156 of 13796

EDIT: nvm

post #11157 of 13796
12c and windy. I'm regretting not wearing something made of down.
post #11158 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

12c and windy. I'm regretting not wearing something made of down.

 

Speaking of down, can anyone recommend any knee-length down coats? I have my Norwegian Rain Moscow that goes down to my knees, but I want another serious longer-length winter coat to rotate. The mid-thigh length of most down parkas just don't seem to cut it for me while standing out on elevated train platforms in Chicago during the winter.

 

So far I've only found the following brands that make knee-length coats:

 

1) Acne studios: Montreal, I think they come out with this model every FW season

2) Griffin Studios: their sleeping bag coat

 

And that's it, so any recommendations/suggestions are welcome

post #11159 of 13796
Get a pair of shell pants.
post #11160 of 13796
Quote:
Originally Posted by happyriverz View Post
 

 

Speaking of down, can anyone recommend any knee-length down coats? I have my Norwegian Rain Moscow that goes down to my knees, but I want another serious longer-length winter coat to rotate. The mid-thigh length of most down parkas just don't seem to cut it for me while standing out on elevated train platforms in Chicago during the winter.

 

So far I've only found the following brands that make knee-length coats:

 

1) Acne studios: Montreal, I think they come out with this model every FW season

2) Griffin Studios: their sleeping bag coat

 

And that's it, so any recommendations/suggestions are welcome


Get the Arc'teryx Veilance Sinter. Wind and waterproof which makes for great heat retention. It'll be knee length if you're 5'8" 

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