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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 693

post #10381 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by accordion View Post

When you guys say "shit pay," how much are we talking about exactly? Enough to live in the city on? What's the upward mobility?

Depends on the job obviously, but in my experience you can expect a good 15-20% less in yearly pay compared to an equivalent job in another industry.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LonerMatt View Post

I'll take your word for it - I haven't been in a few months. Is it really that bad just to walk down and enter a shop?

TCR station is a bit of a nightmare atm with all the crossrail stuff happening.
post #10382 of 13759
Fashionista conducted a survey a few months ago on what people typically make in this industry, given certain positions:

http://fashionista.com/2016/02/fashion-jobs
post #10383 of 13759

how do you know all this stuff man!  you're a treasure trove of cool info!  

 

also.. what's up with LN-CC?  just checked it out after a couple of years and a lot of the stuff there looks really off/weird not in a good way..


Edited by penanceroyaltea - 6/22/16 at 7:57am
post #10384 of 13759
Esquire just appointed a new editor-in-chief last week, Jay Fielden. He was a former editor at Men's Vogue and Town & Country (the second only tangentially related to men's fashion, but is very close to it). I don't know his salary, but his house was lost in a fire a few years ago and he had to rebuild it. NYT did a story on the restoration back in 2013.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/07/greathomesanddestinations/jay-fieldens-restoration-drama.html

For some reason, I can't get the slideshow link at the bottom to work right now, but from memory, the photos are amazing.

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2013/02/07/greathomesanddestinations/20130207-LOCATION.html#1

Granted, he's the editor-in-chief at these magazines, but still -- that home has to be in the many millions of dollars (nevermind all the stuff in it that he had to replace).
post #10385 of 13759
The timing of his house purchase tells a lot about the story. Also people trying to climb the ranks of a creative field don't buy houses in Connecticut, this family was cut from a finer cloth based on the evidence at hand... foo.gif

Before 2008, even more so before 2006, it was possible to make good money (relatively) in the field. At the peak of my corporate career in NYC I was able to charge certain clients $75/hr as a freelancer and I still had health insurance and a 401k plan through my agency, and I often made overtime (1.5X my usual rate). Unfortunately for me, I was a young kid living in NYC and had a lot of fun there, but I didn't really save any of that money while I was making it.

Now... that's not really the case. It's especially difficult because most jobs are in NYC and rents there have gone up exponentially while salaries have stayed the same or gone down. The market is flooded with design school grads who think they'll be the next McQueen or whoever kids look up to these days. They work for free and later for very little and end up sitting behind a computer working on techpacks to send to China. Their souls are crushed and they fall in line and accept the reality of it.

We're trained in a very specific skillset that is hardly useful for anything else. That's another big part of the equation. People need to pay bills so they will take jobs at shit companies because they're the only ones that are hiring.

It's all a vicious cycle.
post #10386 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClambakeSkate View Post

The timing of his house purchase tells a lot about the story. Also people trying to climb the ranks of a creative field don't buy houses in Connecticut, this family was cut from a finer cloth based on the evidence at hand... foo.gifWarning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Before 2008, even more so before 2006, it was possible to make good money (relatively) in the field. At the peak of my corporate career in NYC I was able to charge certain clients $75/hr as a freelancer and I still had health insurance and a 401k plan through my agency, and I often made overtime (1.5X my usual rate). Unfortunately for me, I was a young kid living in NYC and had a lot of fun there, but I didn't really save any of that money while I was making it.

Now... that's not really the case. It's especially difficult because most jobs are in NYC and rents there have gone up exponentially while salaries have stayed the same or gone down. The market is flooded with design school grads who think they'll be the next McQueen or whoever kids look up to these days. They work for free and later for very little and end up sitting behind a computer working on techpacks to send to China. Their souls are crushed and they fall in line and accept the reality of it.

We're trained in a very specific skillset that is hardly useful for anything else. That's another big part of the equation. People need to pay bills so they will take jobs at shit companies because they're the only ones that are hiring.

It's all a vicious cycle.

That story would be true for almost any industry though -- the recession, niche skill sets, housing market booms, etc. What you're describing is less a story about the fashion industry and more about the general economy as a whole. Academics, lawyers, accountants, designers, musicians, etc would all describe the same story.

I don't know Fielden's family background, but people in similar positions live similar lifestyles. Higher-up editors at big magazines often have very nice, multi-million dollar homes.
post #10387 of 13759
True, very true. I only speak from experience and don't know the economic standings of other industries.
post #10388 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardB View Post

Entry-level in NYC is around 30-40K for design/tech/production/product development ("cooler" companies are on the lower end of this spectrum, mass market is on the higher end). Unless you know someone, you're usually expected to have interned for a while (like...at least a year) before you're even considered for these types of positions.

You can make double that with full benefits in entry level QA jobs. redface.gif
post #10389 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

You can make double that with full benefits in entry level QA jobs. redface.gif

Yea, but then you'd have a software QA job.

There are plenty of industries with higher starting salaries. The daily tasks sound mind numbingly boring though.
post #10390 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Yea, but then you'd have a software QA job.

There are plenty of industries with higher starting salaries. The daily tasks sound mind numbingly boring though.

What Edward posted sounds awful too. Like staging as a chef only to make minimum wage after.
post #10391 of 13759
You can probably expect an entry level fashion role in London to net you £20-25k,and that's after doing an internship and having a relevant degree.
post #10392 of 13759
So uhhh new Balenciaga show...
post #10393 of 13759
So is anybody in the Chicago area looking to hire a third year fashion design student? :hides:
post #10394 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


Yea, but then you'd have a software QA job.

There are plenty of industries with higher starting salaries. The daily tasks sound mind numbingly boring though.

 

So true, but being a lawyer is how I can afford to buy any fashion pieces.

post #10395 of 13759
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Fashionista conducted a survey a few months ago on what people typically make in this industry, given certain positions:

http://fashionista.com/2016/02/fashion-jobs

I'd say this is pretty accurate (speaking on the Design side of things). I know quite a few people in the design field who make more at the high level (from Senior Design on up) especially when you factor in bonuses and such. I'll agree with what a lot are saying here is that the work can be rather soulless. It really depends on the company but I've worked for a large range from small to big to really big and each one has it's draw backs that's for sure. I've worked at smaller ones that were a lot of fun, a lot of work, actually ran pretty smooth but I got burned out fast and I have worked for a bigger company doing less work, having less creative freedom, and dealing with multiple layers of management that didn't have a clue what they were doing with initiatives and direction changing constantly. It's honestly kind of a crap shoot. But I will say, working on the west coast here in the US is much more easy going when compared to many places abroad or even on the east coast. It's much more relaxed and the pace is way slower. Although pay on the west coast isn't as good for the most part.
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