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Random fashion thoughts - Part II (A New Hope) - Page 676

post #10126 of 13945
edit don't remember if that was fact
post #10127 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

What's up with dudes wearing windsors/half windsors? See it everywhere, always tied too short. Is that like what GQ says is fancier?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

A full Windsor is a big, fat, ostentatious knot, but the half windsor is sorta the standard knot of choice.  It's symmetrical, it's neat, and it is more formal than a four-in-hand.  It's the knot that we had to use in my high school uniform, for example.  

A full Windsor used to be more popular, and ties were tied shorter as well - remember that pants used to sit much closer to the natural waist.  a half Windsor is not going to be that short unless you are really tall, or don't know how to gauge how much length to leave in the blade.  

Also, I think that if a tie hits below the top of the belt. it's probably too long.  A lot too short also looks silly, but I tend to err on the side of too short rather than too long,   Too long says "high school prom."

The knot was supposedly inspired by the Duke of Windsor, who favored bigger knots late in life. He still wore a four-in-hand, but ordered ties made from thicker fabrics. Other men, who wore thinner fabrics, found new ways to tie their ties in a way that imitated the thicker knot (which is why we call it the Full Windsor/ Half Windsor)






The look wasn't carried over by the English aristocracy after Edward's death, and eventually just became something the lower classes wore (which, to be honest, is probably why we hate it).

In the US, most guys learned it through their service in the military during the '30s - '50s (when it was regulation wear), and then later taught it to their kids. I think it survives today because -- until very recently -- most guys learned their fashion rules from peers and members in their family.
Edited by dieworkwear - 6/4/16 at 4:58pm
post #10128 of 13945

Uhh how do you tie a tie if it's not full or half windsor? :uhoh:

post #10129 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by t3hg0suazn View Post

Uhh how do you tie a tie if it's not full or half windsor? uhoh.gif

Four-in-hand is considered a bit more tasteful. Small knot, little asymmetrical.
post #10130 of 13945
I wish I could get the CM approved dimple correctly.
post #10131 of 13945

Double four in hand is the knot du jour

post #10132 of 13945
I have been after a cravat for some time, I decided that if it's a formal affair then why not go all out. I was at Bergdorf and asked for a selection of cravats, i was taken to a back room with drawers that probably hadn't seen the light of day in decades. it was a bizarre experience
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyc wid it View Post

I wish I could get the CM approved dimple correctly.

this is really depressing
post #10133 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by the shah View Post

I have been after a cravat for some time, I decided that if it's a formal affair then why not go all out. I was at Bergdorf and asked for a selection of cravats, i was taken to a back room with drawers that probably hadn't seen the light of day in decades. it was a bizarre experience

One day, I'm going to start an ascot subscription service and call it Your Ascot Served.
post #10134 of 13945
Better book the domain name now.
post #10135 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post







 

 

I love this portrait. 

post #10136 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


this is how i look when people start talking about the finer points of tie knots
post #10137 of 13945
Noctone, I feel like you and I would get along famously.
post #10138 of 13945
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post



The knot was supposedly inspired by the Duke of Windsor, who favored bigger knots late in life. He still wore a four-in-hand, but ordered ties made from thicker fabrics. Other men, who wore thinner fabrics, found new ways to tie their ties in a way that imitated the thicker knot (which is why we call it the Full Windsor/ Half Windsor)






The look wasn't carried over by the English aristocracy after Edward's death, and eventually just became something the lower classes wore (which, to be honest, is probably why we hate it).

In the US, most guys learned it through their service in the military during the '30s - '50s (when it was regulation wear), and then later taught it to their kids. I think it survives today because -- until very recently -- most guys learned their fashion rules from peers and members in their family.

A half Windsor is still the regulation knot in a lot of schools in which you still have to wear a tie,  It was in mine, for example.  A four-in-hand was simply not allowed.  There was a way to do a knot, and it was the half windsor.  I have never worn a full windsor.  The knot is just huge.  I will wear a half windsor for more formal occasions (weddings, interviews, etc...) and save the four in hand for things like grenadines and knit ties, worn "casually".

 

Re. us not liking it because it is something that the lower classes wore, I just don't buy it.  We love things that lower classes wore and things that are inspired by working class subcultures - fishtail parkas, slim mod style suits, jeans, workwear anything, chore coats, etc.  I think that no one really cares.

post #10139 of 13945
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Guy View Post

Re. us not liking it because it is something that the lower classes wore, I just don't buy it.  We love things that lower classes wore and things that are inspired by working class subcultures - fishtail parkas, slim mod style suits, jeans, workwear anything, chore coats, etc.  I think that no one really cares.

I think tailored clothing is a little more traditional though. Ideas about "good taste" are very much governed by class. Even the few exceptions I can think of -- e.g. seersucker once being a poor man's cloth -- were only widely accepted once social elites wore them.

I can't think of any examples of where something exclusively designated "working class" is considered "good."

Realize this is shitty and dumb, but that's the dynamic. If a bunch of English aristocrats, Hollywood elites, and US tycoons wore the full-Windsor for the second half of the 20th century, it wouldn't be considered "bad."
post #10140 of 13945
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


I think tailored clothing is a little more traditional though. Ideas about "good taste" are very much governed by class. Even the few exceptions I can think of -- e.g. seersucker once being a poor man's cloth -- were only widely accepted once social elites wore them.

I can't think of any examples of where something exclusively designated "working class" is considered "good."

Realize this is shitty and dumb, but that's the dynamic. If a bunch of English aristocrats, Hollywood elites, and US tycoons wore the full-Windsor for the second half of the 20th century, it wouldn't be considered "bad."

What abot the slim suits and minimal details inspired by mods? They has been considered in good taste  - as opposed to the ostentatious "Pitti" uniforms that people have fun reviling.

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