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post #136 of 501
For those sill following the Yale saga, the University appears to have capitulated.
post #137 of 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

For those sill following the Yale saga, the University appears to have capitulated.
How so? I dont see anything on the web.
post #138 of 501
Here's the email from President Salovey:
Quote:
Dear Members of the Yale Community,

In my thirty-five years on this campus, I have never been as simultaneously moved, challenged, and encouraged by our community—and all the promise it embodies—as in the past two weeks. You have given strong voice to the need for us to work toward a better, more diverse, and more inclusive Yale. You have offered me the opportunity to listen to and learn from you—students, faculty, staff, and alumni, from every part of the university.

I have heard the expressions of those who do not feel fully included at Yale, many of whom have described experiences of isolation, and even of hostility, during their time here. It is clear that we need to make significant changes so that all members of our community truly feel welcome and can participate equally in the activities of the university, and to reaffirm and reinforce our commitment to a campus where hatred and discrimination have no place.

We begin this work by laying to rest the claim that it conflicts with our commitment to free speech, which is unshakeable. The very purpose of our gathering together into a university community is to engage in teaching, learning, and research—to study and think together, sometimes to argue with and challenge one another, even at the risk of discord, but always to take care to preserve our ability to learn from one another.

Yale’s long history, even in these past two weeks, has shown a steadfast devotion to full freedom of expression. No one has been silenced or punished for speaking their minds, nor will they be. This freedom, which is the bedrock of education, equips us with the fullness of mind to pursue our shared goal of creating a more inclusive community.
Four key areas, outlined below, will give structure to our efforts to build a more inclusive Yale, and the deans of all of Yale’s schools will provide leadership across the university. I look forward to working with everyone in the days and months ahead to refine and expand on these themes. In a time when universities and communities around the country are coming together to address longstanding inequalities, I believe that Yale can and should lead the way. Many of you have proposed ideas for constructive steps forward, and my hope is that our collective endeavors can become a model for others to emulate.

The conversations we are having today, about freedom of expression and the need for inclusivity and respect—principles that are not mutually exclusive—resonate deeply with the issue Dean Holloway and I addressed at the beginning of the semester, about the name of Calhoun College. At that time, I quoted President Lincoln and said that Yale, like our nation, has “unfinished work.” This is just as true with the work that stands before us now. I am eager to embark on it with you.

***

Strengthening the Academic Enterprise
Race, ethnicity, and other aspects of social identity are central issues of our era, issues that should be a focus of particularly intense study at a great university. For some time, Yale has been exploring the possibility of creating a prominent university center supporting the exciting scholarship represented by these and related areas. Recent events across the country have made clear that now is the time to develop such a transformative, multidisciplinary center drawing on expertise from across Yale’s schools; it will be launched this year and will have significant resources for both programming and staff. Over time, this center will position Yale to stand at the forefront of research and teaching in these intellectually ambitious and important fields.

Yale already has outstanding faculty members who are doing cutting-edge scholarship on the histories, lives, and cultures of unrepresented and under-represented communities. To build on this strong foundation, I will ask the committee that oversees the allocation of resources in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to devote four additional faculty positions to these areas, housing them in relevant FAS departments and programs. We will hire the very best scholars to bring their knowledge and insight to our students and the broader community.

In the meantime, in expectation of increased student interest, we are adding additional teaching staff and courses in Yale College starting in spring 2016 that address these topics. To continue the conversation outside the classroom, throughout the university, Yale will launch a five-year series of conferences on issues of race, gender, inequality, and
inclusion.

Earlier this month Provost Ben Polak and I announced a $50 million, five-year, university-wide initiative that will enable all of our schools to enhance faculty diversity. This is a campus-wide priority. Within the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which includes the faculty who teach in Yale College, we will invite one of our senior faculty members to take on the responsibility of helping to guide the FAS in its diversity efforts and its implementation of the initiative. This new leadership position will be located in the office of the dean of the FAS, and will hold the title of deputy dean for diversity in the FAS and special advisor to the provost and president. The deputy dean will also coordinate support and mentoring for our untenured faculty. Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Tamar Gendler and the FAS deputy dean will convene a new committee to advise them about faculty diversity issues and strategies for inclusion.

Expanding Programs, Services, and Support for Students
Starting in 2016-17, the program budgets for the four cultural centers will double, augmenting the increases made this year and the ongoing facilities upgrades resulting from last year’s external review. The expanded funding will enable the centers to strengthen support for undergraduate students and extend support to the graduate and professional student communities. Staffing will be adjusted, and facilities for each center will continue to be assessed with an eye toward identifying additional enhancements. In addition, I will ask the deans of our schools to explore ways in which our community, including our extraordinary alumni, can increase the support and mentorship they provide to our students.

Financial aid policies for low-income students in Yale College, the subject of a spring 2015 report by the Yale College Council, will also see improvements beginning in the next academic year. Details will soon be announced, and will include a reduction in the student effort expectation for current students. In the meantime, funds for emergencies and special circumstances already available through the residential colleges and the financial aid offices are also being reviewed and increased. We will follow up with the graduate and professional schools to ensure that they also have the capacity to support students in times of emergency.
Professional counselors from YaleHealth will work with the directors of the four cultural centers to schedule specified hours at each center, building on the existing mental health fellows program in the residential colleges. Additional multicultural training will be provided to all of the staff in the Department of Mental Health and Counseling at YaleHealth, and renewed efforts will be made to increase the diversity of its professional staff. These changes are in addition to the improvements that we are already making in our mental health services for students across the university.

Improving Institutional Structures and Practices
Educating our community about race, ethnicity, diversity, and inclusion begins with the university’s leadership. I, along with the vice presidents, deans, provosts, and other members of the administration, will receive training on recognizing and combating racism and other forms of discrimination in the academy. Similar programs will be provided to department chairs, directors of graduate and undergraduate studies, masters and deans, student affairs staff, and others across the university.

We are also making funds available to improve existing programs and develop new ones—both during orientation periods and beyond—that explore diversity and inclusion and provide tools for open conversations in all parts of the university about these issues. Programs may take the form of trainings, speaker series, or other ongoing activities. We will appoint a committee of students, faculty, and staff to help us develop and implement these efforts, so that we can learn to work together better to create an inclusive community, a community in which all feel they belong.

The work of creating robust and clear mechanisms for reporting, tracking, and addressing actions that may violate the university’s clear nondiscrimination policies will be rolled out in two phases: in the first, which will take place immediately, we will work with students to communicate more clearly the available pathways and resources for reporting and/or resolution. Then, in the spring, we will review and adopt, with input from students, measures to strengthen mechanisms that address discrimination. I have asked Secretary and Vice President for Student Life Kim Goff-Crews to lead this work.

Representations of Diversity on Campus
To broaden the visible representations of our community on campus, I am asking the Committee on Public Art to hold an open session at which members of the campus can present ideas for how we might better convey and celebrate our diversity and its history. Just as Yale in recent years has heralded the role and contributions of women by increasing the number of portraits of women across campus and by commissioning the Women’s Table in front of Sterling Memorial Library, we can more accurately reflect the vibrancy of our university community.

Finally, many of you have asked with renewed interest about the names of the new residential colleges as well as the name of Calhoun College. In the next year, the Yale Corporation will be deciding the names of the two new colleges that will open in August 2017. I have asked the Corporation’s senior fellow to organize meetings with several other fellows at which community members can express their views both about names for the new colleges and about Calhoun. Corporation fellows value, and will continue to hold, in-person and other discussions as they move toward making decisions.

***
We take these important steps in the full knowledge that our community will have to do much more to create a fully inclusive campus. To lead the way forward, I am creating a presidential task force representing all constituencies to consider other projects and policies. The efforts that we launch today, and the commitment to the core values they represent, must be continuous, ongoing, and shared by all of us. I thank all of you for the perspectives you have offered already and for all that you will contribute to the work that lies ahead.
Sincerely,
Peter Salovey
President and Chris Argyris Professor of Psychology
post #139 of 501
Thanks!
post #140 of 501
Thread Starter 
Putting out a fire with a gasoline truck. Smart.
post #141 of 501
TL;DNR
post #142 of 501
I wouldn't call that capitulating...

addressing real issues is reasonable.

I was worried you were going to say they kicked out the Resident Masters...that's what I would call capitulating.
post #143 of 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

TL;DNR
I am pretty sure that was the intention. TL will hopefully cause the alums to DNR
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I wouldn't call that capitulating...

addressing real issues is reasonable.

I was worried you were going to say they kicked out the Resident Masters...that's what I would call capitulating.
Well if you agree that the demands are based on real issues then you won't find meeting the demands capitulation. But this is not really a response to the Silwell situation so much as a capitulation to the Next Yale demands.
post #144 of 501
Thread Starter 
Campus administrators are enabling these young people. Their victim status is a pathology. Their view of progress and self depends upon others' fear and capitulation. Is any group more coddled, entitled, feared, counseled-to, and unaccountable as a favored minority on the American college campus?

Do they feel isolated? Maybe leaving their safe space race enclave would help. Maybe studying something other than oppression studies would help. Maybe letting other students study in the library would help.

If they feel isolated, maybe its not their race. Maybe its them.

I'm thankful that I don't have to attend classes with such self-righteous, petulant race-hate fascists.
post #145 of 501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lighthouse View Post

Campus administrators are enabling these young people. Their victim status is a pathology. Their view of progress and self depends upon others' fear and capitulation. Is any group more coddled, entitled, feared, counseled-to, and unaccountable as a favored minority on the American college campus?

Do they feel isolated? Maybe leaving their safe space race enclave would help. Maybe studying something other than oppression studies would help. Maybe letting other students study in the library would help.

If they feel isolated, maybe its not their race. Maybe its them.

I'm thankful that I don't have to attend classes with such self-righteous, petulant race-hate fascists.

Saw a video from Dartmouth where a group of whites was protesting alongside a group of black students in an act of solidarity. The black students kicked the whites out of the protest and, lead by some blonde bint, the white students responded by organizing and saying something like "let's leave now and give them a place to heal." She forgot to apologize for being the host of a privileged womb that would eventually bear a cis-fetus no less evil or oppressive than Crang.

I don't understand why other students aren't telling these people to shut the fuck up when they barge into a library.
post #146 of 501
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

Saw a video from Dartmouth where a group of whites was protesting alongside a group of black students in an act of solidarity. The black students kicked the whites out of the protest and, lead by some blonde bint, the white students responded by organizing and saying something like "let's leave now and give them a place to heal." She forgot to apologize for being the host of a privileged womb that would eventually bear a cis-fetus no less evil or oppressive than Crang.

I don't understand why other students aren't telling these people to shut the fuck up when they barge into a library.

I don't think that was Dartmouth, I think it was Mizzou, but I could be wrong. I saw the same video. The white race-groupies were cute, as they tried to rationalize the slap down. I thought they understood what the SJW, BLM ideology was (racism), but I guess not.

If I were on campus today, I'd recruit a bunch of people (any race or gender, of course) to hold up signs saying something like, "Isolated? Maybe its Just You."

Of course my group would immediately be assaulted and battered, but I'd take some punches to get them expelled or charged. Also, the video would go viral and Hannity could use it as propaganda.
post #147 of 501

http://www.businessinsider.com/alan-dershowitz-thinks-student-protesters-dont-want-true-diversity-in-colleges-2015-11

 

Full article (Click to show)

High-profile incidents of racial discrimination at the University of Missouri have spurred students across the US to protest racism on their own campuses.

And while many civil libertarians have lauded the students' actions, Alan Dershowitz, a prominent Harvard Law School professor, has ripped into these students for what he argues are hypocritical demands.

"The last thing these students want is diversity," Dershowitz told Business Insider.

"They may want superficial diversity, because for them diversity is a code word for 'more of us.' They don't want more conservatives, they don't want more white students, they don't want more heterosexuals."

Dershowitz, a leading proponent of civil liberties and a defense attorney who advised on the O.J. Simpson murder trial and numerous other celebrity cases, was commenting on what he calls a dangerous trend of "tyrannical students" on college campuses.

At numerous schools — including the University of Missouri and Yale University — students have protested racism on campus and called for the resignation of administration members who they say are creating a dangerous environment. And at Amherst College, students have threatened to respond in a "radical manner" if their demands are not met.

At Mizzou, Tim Wolfe stepped down as president after months of tension on campus. Students there have now demanded a more inclusive campus and to see black faculty grow to 15% within 10 years.

But Dershowitz counters that students don't want actual diversity on campus.

"I think the most important thing to point out is the double standard and the hypocrisy," Dershowitz said. "These are students who want safe spaces for themselves but not for others. They're prepared to spit on people going out of lectures."

Dershowitz is referring an incident after a free-speech conference at Yale earlier this month in which several attendees were spat on and called racist, people who went to the conference toldthe Yale Daily News. One minority student who attended the conference told the YDN he was called a traitor.

Further, Dershowitz, who is Jewish, argues that he has been the victim of anti-Semitism and hateful language on campus by the very students who intend to remove all harmful language from campus.

When he spoke at the City College of New York (CUNY), he said, he was met with shouts of "Zionists out of CUNY." At Johns Hopkins there were posters showing his face defaced with Hitler mustaches, he said. When he attends lectures or gives speeches on campus, Dershowitz says, he needs police officers to escort him around campus for his own safety.

"These students don't want me to be safe," he said. "They don't want students who agree with me to be safe. They just want their ideas to be safe and protected from any contrary point of view."

post #148 of 501
How Obama is bankrolling a nonstop protest against invented outrage

http://nypost.com/2015/11/14/how-obama-is-bankrolling-a-non-stop-protest-against-invented-outrage/

I agree fully with this article.
post #149 of 501
post #150 of 501
I wonder what will be the first school to stand up to this? I suspect it may in fact be Princeton, which will address it by throwing money around but not touching the curriculum or renaming anything. You can spend a few dollars of your tuition-paying students' parents' money on an Inclusion Officer and give zher a budget for milk and cookies at the mandatory optional indoctrination ceremony and call it a day. But I would be shocked if Princeton will mess with education. That is one of the places where it still matters.
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