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Protecting ties - Page 2

post #16 of 20
Quote:
Am I the only one who uses the napkin as a bib when I want to indulge in bolognese sauce?
absolutely not. i'd do the same thing except i rarely wear a tie. i just wouldn't order bolognese sauce during a business lunch. i've seen too many disasters.
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Better to sacrifice your tie than your dignity.  All those protective maneuvers are graceless.  Eat carefully or buy ties you can afford to replace when they get nailed with misdirected food.     My secret weapon?  An old can of Scotch Guard, which provides an invisible protective shield.  Unfortunately it's been taken off the market for environmental reasons.
Your dignity seems very fragile if you think it depends on how you wear a tie.
post #18 of 20
Sometimes I put my tie in my jacket's pocket.
post #19 of 20
I am gonna go on a limb here and quote MistahLee on a previous thread and then run with it.  Its on a limb only because although I agree with the philosophy, I think that it runs against the grain of popular thinking here. Ragerdless, I admire MistahLee for voicing it himself.
Quote:
...the tie has a physical life shorter than others.  It is touched by the hands a lot and also by the chin.  From skin oil or cologne or whatever it gets dull.  Moreover it always is up front, vulnerable to thread pulls, stains and so on.  And, in my experience, a tie never is the same after a dry cleaning. Because of the above facts, I feel about the tie that it is somewhat of a disposable item.  And, perhaps because of that feeling, I soon lose interest in any particular tie.  Indeed it would be rare for me to wear the same tie more than three times.   All this makes me think a really expensive tie is not a good wardrobe investment.  I have a few, but tend to admire them in the closet rather than in the mirror.  Better, methinks, to pick up ties by the dozen at the Zegna outlet store, for example.  Often the creative pop comes into an assemblage from a fresh, bright, tie so one wants as many of them as possible.
There are two issues here, first of all its a professional lunch, and you are here to make impressions.  I would think that no matter how you slice it you are gonna look strange (pardon me for those that disagree, its just my opinion) if you throw the darned thing over your shoulder, tuck it in to your button or show in any way that you are concerned with getting your tie dirty.  Oh certainly one should not just waste ties and get them filthy but the impression you are trying to give is that that a)You can handle eating without wearing full body armor, and b)you have enough street sense to not be wearing a tie that will spoil your day if it does in fact get dirty. Secondly in general many people wear things that are above their means and they cant enjoy themselves and whatever they are doing for fear of ruining them.  I saw a guy run out of a store SHREIKING at someone who was not really all that close to dinging his Acura NSX.  Yeah, its a nice car but whats the point of having it if you cant live and enjoy life with it?   If you have to take a tie off, or throw it around your neck when you are eating maybe its time to reevaluate if you should be buying ties or clothing like that.   I dont enjoy it when a tie or anything gets ruined but its just a tie, not a life and its here for me to enjoy life, so you do your best to avoid getting it dirty and whatever happens happens. Button your jacket like A. Harris look confident and comfortable and enjoy yourself. OK... Attack away.   JJF
post #20 of 20
Another option: make certain that your shirts are always better than your ties, then you will instead see the food-on-the-tie as the food-which-thankfully-missed-the-shirt. And then make sure your ties are very wide to protect the maximum amount of shirtfront.
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