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when did the hat die? - Page 5

post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
If you pay a lot of money for a top-quality hair piece, you are not going to wear a hat: you are going to show it off.

About fifteen years ago, IIRC, minoxidil or "Rogaine" was released. An entire generation of men was saved from male pattern baldness. If you spend a lot of money on top-quality hair drugs, you are not going to wear a hat. You are going to show off your hair.

Rogaine doesn't work all that well. You will still have noticeably thinning hair unless you started using it when you very first started losing hair. I know many ppl wear hats just because they no longer have a 15 year old hairline or density. So I think hairloss is more likely to make ppl wear a hat. However, something is to be said for hairloss effecting one's youthful appearance. We lose hair much more readily these days than a generation ago due to the additives and general crappy food that people eat.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
Were hairpieces really as rampant as they say they were?

Hairpieces always struck me as a very perverse piece of vanity.

They are strange things. There are some new ones out that look pretty damned convincing. I dunno, I would probably just shave my head.



Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanC View Post
I think there's a lot of truth to that. However, I see so many people wearing baseball caps these days that clearly people really don't mind wearing hats, and in fact want to or they wouldn't do it. Everybody everywhere seems to be wearing baseball caps.

Everyone *does* wear a hat these days, but it is always a baseball hat or cowboy hat. The baseball hats have got to go but with us importing the world's poor while the middle class has less buying power, things are only going to get trashier unless Usher or 50 Cent start wearing Pork Pies with or without Raider Nation emblems.

My grandpa was the only person I knew who wore a hat. He would wear straw cowboy hats and would work in the yard quite a bit. Now, he wears baseball hats that say "Air Force" or something on it and even wears skater shoes!! because they are comfortable.

I would love to start wearing hats casually, I think many can look young no problem. With a suit, brimmed hats often make you look older and this is the problem. Hippies, rock stars and pretty boys like JFK want to stay forever young. Look outside, we have a society of 40 year old teenagers walking around. Until this changes, the hat won't be coming back into proper order any time soon.
post #62 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
Yes, that is what I see. I also see the country headed into a ten-twenty-plus year period in which the standard of living declines for most people. Two more data points supporting this argument: the rise of ebay and the mad popularity of "uncluttering" advice. Folks are going through their stuff and taking inventory. Secondhand markets appear to be thriving. If we are moving back to a time when the fabled abundance is not so abundant, there's going to be more scrutiny on the quality of the fewer things we can afford to enjoy. The classic hat, the sportcoat, wool pants, handmade (recraftable) shoes, these are things that were perfected in lean times. If we are returning to lean times, that might explain the resurgence in interest in such things. It's just a theory ...
Interesting idea....so, you see these things as precursors of the future? Somehow, we know we need to start preparing??
post #63 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
Yes, that is what I see. I also see the country headed into a ten-twenty-plus year period in which the standard of living declines for most people. Two more data points supporting this argument: the rise of ebay and the mad popularity of "uncluttering" advice. Folks are going through their stuff and taking inventory. Secondhand markets appear to be thriving.

If we are moving back to a time when the fabled abundance is not so abundant, there's going to be more scrutiny on the quality of the fewer things we can afford to enjoy.

The classic hat, the sportcoat, wool pants, handmade (recraftable) shoes, these are things that were perfected in lean times. If we are returning to lean times, that might explain the resurgence in interest in such things.

It's just a theory ...

I feel the same way. We are a culture of quantity and not quality. I grew up this way and am very much minimalistic now. I live in a 250 sq ft studio and have my clothes, laptop and basic cookware. I see the minimalist trend as a good thing but I think it is still a little bit too trendy. Bubba in Arkansas is still gonna cram his trailer full of Pepsi collectibles.
post #64 of 71
Probably one of the top reasons people wear, or don't wear, hats these days is a more competitive mating game. For some young people, looking more mature can be part of that.
post #65 of 71
Didn't think the hat was dead: Here I am wearing a most comfortable one this winter.
post #66 of 71
From my personal experiences and those of my younger siblings, I would say that at the very least the fedora has been back in style for the last 5-6 years. I remember in high school always having at least 10 people I knew wearing one, although being a relatively gino school, that could be the Al Capone in all of them.
As for the elbow-length gloves, those are definitely also making a come back, although at the moment I've only seen them as the holey/homeless person variety in the department stores in France. Should be interesting to see how the trend changes over the next couple of years.
post #67 of 71
I have many hats. In winter, they go so much better with a suit and overcoat than a beanie.
post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
If the hat is returning, I think it is because the people who are younger than the baby boomer generation are not sold on the benefits of the pursuit of perpetual youth. Some of us yearn for maturity in our elders. So perhaps, for a short while at least, we are enjoying a fashion among the youth of "looking old" and hats, long associated with follicle-ly challenged elders, fit right in.

This is very interesting and as a young fellow of 22, I think I share this sentiment. I find myself drawn to dressing more maturely and know that my motivation is, in part, a reaction to my parents, who are a part of the generation that rejected putting time and money into looking like their mature and established parents. My dad is the guy who fondly remembers when Urban Outfitters had a box out in front of free jeans that people had thrown away. Tangentially, he always wears a berret.
post #69 of 71
It's kinda crazy to re-read some of that stuff I wrote months ago. I got pretty involved in some thinking about hats.

Today I'd say few Americans wear classic hats because they are too expensive. People accept cheap substitutes. They are happy to make do with cheap and move on. This is why the most popular hats are cheaply made and cheaply bought.
post #70 of 71
The had did not die.
It moved to Detroit.

This is where you buy your hats when you live in Detroit.

http://www.henrythehatterdetroit.com/

Def check out the "Customer Photos" link on the left.
post #71 of 71
A great shop for hats in Brooklyn is Bencraft Hatters.

They serve the Hasidic community so they're closed on Saturdays but go on Sundays and the place will be swamped with Hasids and people in the know. Their selection is LARGE.
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