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Does money=happiness? - Page 5

post #61 of 91
Money doesn't equal happiness alone, unless you are a shallow son of a bitch. But once you are happy, it sure can make you a whole lot happier!
post #62 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
It would suck not to have money to travel or splurge on things you wanted.
I think this is the issue with people who are arguing 30-50k isn't enough. I'm sure 30k isn't enough in New York or LA but it's enough in Montreal. My a few of my former coworkers just moved to Montreal to start their masters and I've got several friends who live there. My former coworkers won't be making even 10k per year although they've maybe saved up enough for tuition and rent for a year. I guess it depends how expensive your hobbies are. For some of us the loss of experience isn't "negative-happiness". Not having the opportunity to do something =/= happiness. "If you want to make a man richer, limit his desires." This isn't to say I wouldn't be happy given these opportunities.
post #63 of 91
To paraphrase someone else on the forum, Money can't buy you happiness, but poor don't buy you nothing
post #64 of 91
I make ~50k and I can live comfortably in my studio without any kids by myself. My friend makes ~100k and has two kids and a house and can barely make ends meet.
post #65 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I make ~50k and I can live comfortably in my studio without any kids by myself. My friend makes ~100k and has two kids and a house and can barely make ends meet.

More proof that children ruin your life. Without children, I will have a Rubinacci wardrobe by 33.
post #66 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
More proof that children ruin your life. Without children, I will have a Rubinacci wardrobe by 33.

I plan on having 4 kids. Ugh, trying to pscyhe myself up for it.
post #67 of 91
It's peculiar I've only heard people with money say that money doesn't bring happiness.
post #68 of 91
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I plan on having 4 kids. Ugh, trying to pscyhe myself up for it.

Be prepared to have zero disposable income.
post #69 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viktri
I think this is the issue with people who are arguing 30-50k isn't enough. I'm sure 30k isn't enough in New York or LA but it's enough in Montreal. My a few of my former coworkers just moved to Montreal to start their masters and I've got several friends who live there. My former coworkers won't be making even 10k per year although they've maybe saved up enough for tuition and rent for a year.
Yes, I'm a graduate student as well. Social comparison is everything: knowing that most of my comrades around the country are making a third or half of what I do, 30k seems extravagant to me, even here in the SF Bay Area. I'm sure once I'm making a bigger salary and living more luxuriously -- and comparing myself to colleagues making far more money still -- I'll quickly forget how I ever made ends meet on such funds.
post #70 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
I know two people who have inherited money who are happy - and neither inherited enough to live off of it, they inherited enough to nicely suppliment their own incomes.

the people I know who have inherited larger amounts of money have been misrable, mostly as a direct result of the money.
but that is my limited experience.

Even if you inherit enough money to live off for the rest of your life, you can still be happy. Many people who inherit huge fortunes still work.
post #71 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Viktri View Post
I think this is the issue with people who are arguing 30-50k isn't enough. I'm sure 30k isn't enough in New York or LA but it's enough in Montreal. My a few of my former coworkers just moved to Montreal to start their masters and I've got several friends who live there. My former coworkers won't be making even 10k per year although they've maybe saved up enough for tuition and rent for a year.

I guess it depends how expensive your hobbies are.

For some of us the loss of experience isn't "negative-happiness". Not having the opportunity to do something =/= happiness. "If you want to make a man richer, limit his desires." This isn't to say I wouldn't be happy given these opportunities.

To quote The Matrix, ignorance is bliss. Someone that grows up without a lot of material possessions will be a lot happpier on a 30k salary than someone that grew-up being able to ski every weekend, take yearly vacations to Europe, go to nice restaurants, etc. It's the fact that you know what you're missing that negatively impacts your happiness.

As for your friends, they're in a different stage of life where they're expecting to be poor. Sure, you can live in montreal on 15k net a year, but someone that's lived better sure as hell wouldn't want to. One of the best things about Montreal, imo, is the dining and fresh food markets. There's a pretty strong culinary tradition here. I go to the market every weekend to get good quality stuff. I couldn't live off supermarket olive oil and cuts of meat. :P

I think it's just two completely different mindsets. Speaking for myself, I've always expected a good job and a good salary (which I would define as over 100k). Anything less and I will be unhappy with myself.
post #72 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asch View Post
Yes, I'm a graduate student as well. Social comparison is everything: knowing that most of my comrades around the country are making a third or half of what I do, 30k seems extravagant to me, even here in the SF Bay Area. I'm sure once I'm making a bigger salary and living more luxuriously -- and comparing myself to colleagues making far more money still -- I'll quickly forget how I ever made ends meet on such funds.

Thsi has been restated a couple of times and it's very true.
post #73 of 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
Even if you inherit enough money to live off for the rest of your life, you can still be happy. Many people who inherit huge fortunes still work.

again, speaking only of personal experience - the people I know (and I believe it is about 12-15) who inherited enough money to live well without ever working, are all unhappy, and pretty screwed up. from those, though, the happiest are the ones that have worked and focused on building a life that isn't dependent on their inherited money, and the most misrable are the ones that never were able to get off their asses and work
post #74 of 91
I grew up in Las Vegas which is arguably be the most materialistic city in the world. Sex, money, shopping, entertainment in the extreme. It was an interesting upbringing. My dad ran a charity there, and that gave us the opportunity to get to know families of all kinds, from homeless people to owners of casinos. He made my siblings and me volunteer at all the agency's programs: homeless men, homeless families, abused kids, pregnant teens, delinquent boys, the elderly, homes for mentally handicapped adults, thrift stores, etc. His job brought all types to our house. We lived in a middle-class neighborhood but went to the city's best schools. I spent six months living literally dirt-poor in the Philippines, but also six months with ridiculously wealthy relatives who have a live-in staff of 5, as well as swarms of day staff. Who is most happy? I think the problem is that human happiness is complicated because human existence is complicated. We have chemical, biological, intellectual, emotional, social, and historical needs. All of these needs must be met for us to be happy. There's a hierarchy of being in the world in general and in each person. Lower, physical operations ground higher mental and emotional functions. It's hard to study when you're hungry, for example. But on the other hand, the higher functions can affect the lower ones. Mind over matter anyone? Athletes? Mystics? Aristotle had it all right in the Nicomachean Ethics--the fundamental subject of which is precisely the question, What makes us happy? His answer does justice to human complexity: We need a base level of physical/material goods to be happy, but that alone doesn't make us happy. We need health. We need family and friends (who themselves are healthy, etc., since their unhappiness would make us unhappy). Above all, we need virtue. Why? As other people mentioned above, there is a natural human need for meaning and purpose -- to feel that our lives are worth something, that we are intrinsically lovable, and, in fact, loved. Most things we do are to feel we're lovable/respectable/enviable, whatever. It's a big part of the reason we buy what we buy, choose careers, wives, husbands, post on forums, etc. On the question of whether being born rich is a bad thing: In my experience, it is not necessarily a bad thing, but I think it can shift probabilities in favor of being unappreciative of the value of things and the genuine needs of others. There's an old saying that is true in terms of probabilities, not necessity: "To have little inspires thought, to have much inspires conceit." This is true not merely about money, however, but also about good looks, athletic ability, or any good. It's possible for the beautiful blond to be kind, but not likely, at least not when she's young and immature, unless she only lately grew into the beauty--which is similar to a person earning money after experiencing poverty. Money is good. It's all good. And it's all necessary. But virtue is greatest. I'd rather be a virtuous person who was poor than a rich asshole any day. And that's the case not simply because of some moral high ground, but because I'd be happier. Why? Because of that natural, inborn desire to have meaning, to be lovable. In short, goods are good, but it's better to be good than to possess goods.
post #75 of 91
basic needs

health
-good food
-exercise
-rest

freedom from stress

good family/friend relationships

having skill or talent in something you enjoy and makes you feel competent, potent, powerful, useful, etc. this should also be something that challenges you and that you can progress in. skills, trades, hobbies, passions. you need these.

fun & adventure
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