or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Steamer reviews
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Steamer reviews - Page 2

post #16 of 25
My issue with ironing shirts is that it's difficult to go near the placket without getting the iron near the buttons which I don't like to do, I can generally steam shirts to perfection in about a minute, what type of steamer are you using?
post #17 of 25
Steaming and ironing are different processes, even though both use steam. When you steam pants, hang them as you would in your closet, from the cuffs. That way the crease remains as it should. When I tried to steam very wrinkled shirts that had just been washed, I soon found out that they really needed to be ironed. I got most all of the wrinkles out, but the shirt looked "relaxed" but not crisply ironed. Re: which steamer to buy, Jiffy has been the best for many years and they're used by professionals. I saw my model steamer used at my local Saks. From what I've been seeing over the past year, steamers are gaining in popularity. Accordingly, I would expect other manufacturers to come out with equally high quality steamers and for the prices to come down. Gotta love an open market economy.
post #18 of 25
drizzt3117> It's a Singapore brand called "Novita" - not particularly well-known internationally I suppose but I presume all makes are more similar than dissimilar.  The model is SS19 (click here for the link: http://www.novita.com.sg/steamer.htm) I agree with mano that the shirts look at best "relaxed" and not crisply pressed.  That's my problem - I want it to look really crisp. (especially in Singapore when it's NOT the norm to wear suits/jackets, the shirt is open to greater scrutiny) mano> I steam my pants the very way you described: hungs from the cuffs.  Do you not feel that with each wear, the crease line gets less distinct and unless you press it with an iron, it's difficult to restore this line?
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
For creasing trousers (after having steamed them out) I will lay the leg flat and cover it with a thin cotton cloth to keep the hot metal off the wool and use firm pressure once or twice down each leg - perfect. Using an iron as a steamer - sounds great in theory, living in theory generally seems to result in wasted hours/days... a real steamer for $100 or so will save you hundreds in cleaning (thousands???) and cut the time from 15 minutes with a kinda sorta steamer iron all in one thingy versus 2 minutes with the instant cloud-o-steam kind... what's your time worth?
post #20 of 25
Quote:
mano> I steam my pants the very way you described: hungs from the cuffs.  Do you not feel that with each wear, the crease line gets less distinct and unless you press it with an iron, it's difficult to restore this line?
Pants have to be pressed from time to time to maintain the crease. Steaming is good for in-between times to get them back into shape, but it will relax the crease just like it relaxes wrinkles. Pressing the crease with an iron takes me maybe 2-3 minutes per pair of pants. No big deal.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Anybody have any experience with the Rowenta steamers? I have seen them for sale at Bed, Bath and Beyond, and my wife tells me they make very good stuff.
I've owned a couple and I think they suck, to put it mildly. Little steam, water dripping from the water container, and -- worst of all -- large water droplets shooting out together w/ the "steam", thoroughly drenching anything I touched with the darn thing. Finally gave up and tossed it in the trash. For what it's worth... JV
post #22 of 25
If the steamer is only going to get rid of wrinkles, why not just throw the shirt into the dryer with a damp towel then? It seems everybody is saying that a iron is still better.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
If the steamer is only going to get rid of wrinkles, why not just throw the shirt into the dryer with a damp towel then? It seems everybody is saying that a iron is still better.
good on trousers, great on suits, sportscoats, blazers, and delicates that cannot be ironed.
post #24 of 25
So what's the verdict -- if I iron 4-5 shirts per week, use the steam function on my iron on 2-3 pairs of pants (and possibly a suit) every couple weeks, should I invest in a steamer? Will I be able to take a shirt out of the dryer, stick it on a hanger, run the steamer, and in approx. one minute have a shirt that's ready to wear to the office? If the answer is yes, it sounds like it's worth the $100 for the time savings.
post #25 of 25
For cotton shirts, ironing works the best I believe. For wool cashmire etc .. i use steam. For steamer, I use Shark Steamer. It's designed for house/bathroom cleaning unit, so it's steam power will make hole on a cloth easily when used by itself. I use window/mirror cleaning wide mouth nozzle wrapped around clean cloth. This way any excessive water spit out by the nozzle gets caught by the filter cloth. It works well.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Steamer reviews