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post #61 of 73
What do people think about Andre from Outkast? He can wear anything from a jockey outfit to green pants with a apink dress shirt and a green tie. He looks great in everything and wears what he likes.
post #62 of 73
can't believe nobody has mentioned Fred. and for "fantasy figure", Patrick Macnee (as Steed in "The Avengers") has to figure in there somewhere, no?. (sorry about the poor photo quality...but Astaire demonstrates well that you can recognize style even in a tiny, poorly-compressed image&#33
post #63 of 73
of course fred...but patrick's avengers look more theatrical than realistic..one can easily emulate the style of a cary grant or fred astaire in real life without looking stagey
post #64 of 73
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post #65 of 73
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(minimal @ 09 Oct. 2004, 06:25)
Beautifully fitting suit.  The velvet collar is silly, however.
That is called a frog coat, it means that you are dealing with someone from noble descent I believe.
post #66 of 73
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post #67 of 73
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(Manton @ 09 Oct. 2004, 07:59) Beautifully fitting suit.  The velvet collar is silly, however.
That is called a frog coat, it means that you are dealing with someone from noble descent I believe.
If my memory serves me correctly... Early in the Avengers, the producers called in Patrick Macnee to tell him to make his character Steed more memorable, to distinguish it from Ian Hendry's Dr David Keel, his co-star at the time. Macnee even refers to that period of the show as simply "Two Men in Raincoats", the old spy-show trope. To make his character stand out more from Hendry's more traditional leading man, Macnee decided to go over the top. Inspired by his father, an alcoholic Edwardian dandy and racehorse trainer, he began commissioning fancy velvet-collared jackets, wearing carnations and Chelsea boots, and carrying a whangee-handled umbrella and a Herbert Johnson bowler, which even at that time was a caricature of the British gent. This deliberately flamboyant personage was intentional, an affectation and not some misguided attempt by the makers of the show to try to have a typical British gentleman. As an Old Etonian, Macnee himself knew better. Instead, Steed became a whimsical, atavistic figure of a bygone age -- a self-parodying Regency dandy, an effetely-dressed fop with an iron backbone, a sword in his umbrella and a steel-reinforced bowler. This interplay between the trad living fossil Steed and the liberated, rather swinging Emma Peel was part of the magic formula of the series. Steed of course has been a sartorial beacon for me in my quest for the most original in dress as well as cuisine. Truly, he has been an Iron Chap.
post #68 of 73
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post #69 of 73
Now that we've moved to icons in fictional settings, how about Sebastian Flyte (Anthony Andrews) and Charles Ryder (Jeremy Irons) in Brideshead Revisited? I'll try to get some images...a memorable clothes line from the show: Sebastian's older brother, welcoming Sebastian to Oxford (I am paraphrasing): "Clothes. Right. Go to a London tailor, you'll get a better cut and longer credit." This about the costume designer, Jane Robinson: Jane Robinson Jane Robinson's specialty is the glamour of the 1930's and 40's upper crust. Her work is one part evocation of historical mood, and one part jaw dropping elegance of design. Her influential clothes for Brideshead Revisited in 1982 helped set the stage for both the off screen dressiness of the 1980's and 1940's revival look of that decade. Robinson has done creditable modern films - Murder With Mirrors is particularly bright and cheery - but she is without peer in her particular area of expertise. Philip Marlowe, Poor Little Rich Girl, A Handful of Dust, Memphis Belle, Cold Sassy Tree, The Public Eye. from http://members.aol.com/MG4273/costume.htm
post #70 of 73
Quote:
Now that we've moved to icons in fictional settings, how about Sebastian Flyte (Anthony Andrews) and Charles Ryder (Jeremy Irons) in Brideshead Revisited? I'll try to get some images...a memorable clothes line from the show: Sebastian's older brother, welcoming Sebastian to Oxford (I am paraphrasing): "Clothes. Right. Go to a London tailor, you'll get a better cut and longer credit." This about the costume designer, Jane Robinson: Jane Robinson Jane Robinson's specialty is the glamour of the 1930's and 40's upper crust. Her work is one part evocation of historical mood, and one part jaw dropping elegance of design. Her influential clothes for Brideshead Revisited in 1982 helped set the stage for both the off screen dressiness of the 1980's and 1940's revival look of that decade. Robinson has done creditable modern films - Murder With Mirrors is particularly bright and cheery - but she is without peer in her particular area of expertise. Philip Marlowe, Poor Little Rich Girl, A Handful of Dust, Memphis Belle, Cold Sassy Tree, The Public Eye. from http://members.aol.com/MG4273/costume.htm
It was partly because of watching Brideshead Revisited on A&E in the early 1990s that I was propelled into sartorial pursuits. Sebastian and Charles looked so good...of course, I didn't have the budget of the Marchmains nor access to London haberdashers, ha ha.
post #71 of 73
Let's not forget Roxy Music leader Bryan Ferry. I believe he brought unique style back to rock n' roll. [/IMG]
post #72 of 73
Loved John Steed - anyone familiar with Patrick McGoohan of the same period - Dangerman, The Prisoner (now thats a cool TV show to wander way off topic). iiiiiiiiintense. Agree absolutely with Bryan Ferry - suave, even lounge lizard chic. And perhaps a little more lizard than lounge, how about Karl Lagerfeld? I am fascinated by his look in a reptilian kind of way  
post #73 of 73
James Dean.
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