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Combination heels

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know what material is used in the rear part of the heel (not sure what it is called), ie the black part? Why is it used?

Can one buy good quality combination heels whole or do shoe/boot makers make them themselves, ie stacking the leather and the black (rubber?plastic?) part?

Does anyone know where whole or parts of the combination heels can be bought?
post #2 of 12
I believe it's high carbon rubber.

the densest and hardest wearing shoe rubber available.
post #3 of 12
It is a rubber and it is pre-assembled. It is used for traction. I can ask where my cobbler gets them.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarmac View Post
I believe it's high carbon rubber.

the densest and hardest wearing shoe rubber available.

Hmmm, I thought that was used in running shoes, no?

Quote:
Originally Posted by distinctive View Post
It is a rubber and it is pre-assembled. It is used for traction. I can ask where my cobbler gets them.

if you can, that would be of great help. Have you had them before, do you have pics?


Does anyone know whether Lobb, EG, C&J use these preassembled combination heels? Any particular brand, or is it something we will never know?
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ron? other shoemavens?
post #6 of 12
A shoe factory uses two pieces (already assembled) to make the heel. There is the actual heel, two or three layers of leather (cheap shoes use blocks of rubber or hollow plastic moulds), coming already stacked and glued from the sole leather supplier (for example Rendenbach). Then there is the top-lift, a layer of leather with a rubber corner, everything assembled and in place. The top-lift gets stuck on, nailed down and then cut and sanded to it's correct size.

Manufacturers like John Lobb (RTW) or Berluti use a top-lift that incorporates the company's logo. That still comes from an outside supplier. If you order sufficient quantities, they'll just make you, whatever you want.

Equally repair shops use ready assembled top-lifts.
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post
A shoe factory uses two pieces (already assembled) to make the heel. There is the actual heel, two or three layers of leather (cheap shoes use blocks of rubber or hollow plastic moulds), coming already stacked and glued from the sole leather supplier (for example Rendenbach). Then there is the top-lift, a layer of leather with a rubber corner, everything assembled and in place. The top-lift gets stuck on, nailed down and then cut and sanded to it's correct size.

Manufacturers like John Lobb (RTW) or Berluti use a top-lift that incorporates the company's logo. That still comes from an outside supplier. If you order sufficient quantities, they'll just make you, whatever you want.

Equally repair shops use ready assembled top-lifts.

Do you know whether repair shops have the same quality heels and toplifts that manufacturers like Lobb, EG and C&J use? Can you recommend any repair shop that does?
post #8 of 12
My shoe repair guy uses combination heels from Cat's Paw. They're not EG quality, but not bad either.
post #9 of 12
The best wearing combination toplift is made by JR Leather company. By far the longest wearing available today. They will cost much more but the longer wear you get creates a much better value for the dollars spent. Check your local shoe repair shop to see if they have or will get them for you.
post #10 of 12
Actually, I believe Lobb St James has its makers assemble the top-pieces from separate pieces of rubber and leather, something that is annoying to its makers. The other London bespoke firms do use pre-made top lifts, which are ordered from a manufacturer in England, as do the RTW makers. The availability to cobblers of the best toplifts seems pretty limited these days -- I visited a 'grindery' (supplier to the cobbler trade) in London, and they don't have the type of toplifts used by EG, C&J, etc. The combination ones they have are a semi-circular rubber piece, rather than the 'dove-tail' shape used by EG, C&J, Alden, et al. I have found (at least in the past) dove-tail top lifts from a grindery in the USA, but they don't have the tight angles on the corners of the dove-tails, rather these corners are sort of rounded off.

Goetz, a German shoe trade supplier, also does offer the dove-tail top lifts, but again they don't have the nice sharp corners that the RTW top lifts feature.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by distinctive View Post
It is a rubber and it is pre-assembled. It is used for traction. I can ask where my cobbler gets them.
Did you ask him yet?
post #12 of 12
The dove tail heel is known generically as a "McAfee" heel. www.bnelsonshoes.com
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