or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › English lessons
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

English lessons - Page 4

post #46 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
That should be: "One more week of lessons, and I will be fluent" Maybe 2 more weeks would be better.
And what about i'm being fluent?
post #47 of 119
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by drizzt3117,04 Dec. 2004, 8:47
That should be: "One more week of lessons, and I will be fluent" Maybe 2 more weeks would be better.
And what about i'm being fluent?
Not so much... PS: ernie, you know that (in the immortal words of Triumph the Insult Comic Dog) "I KEEEEEEEEEEED..."
post #48 of 119
Yeah, I would just stick with the future tense with will, it's a bit easier to use.
post #49 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Yeah, I would just stick with the future tense with will, it's a bit easier to use.
Isn't it better to say : i am being fluent?
post #50 of 119
fluency is seen as a quality you either have, or don't have... Present tense: "I am fluent in English." Past Tense: "I was fluent in English." Future Tense: "I will be fluent in English." Saying "I am being" is usually used for a temporary situation, such as, "I am being a good boy today, I'm not posting flame wars on the StyleForum." or "I am being smart by not spending too much money on a watch." Hope that helps.
post #51 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
fluency is seen as a quality you either have, or don't have... Present tense: "I am fluent in English."   Past Tense: "I was fluent in English." Future Tense: "I will be fluent in English." Saying "I am being" is usually used for a temporary situation, such as, "I am being a good boy today, I'm not posting flame wars on the StyleForum." or "I am being smart by not spending too much money on a watch." Hope that helps.
I agree If I had been something like buying a tie, "I am buying at the end of the week" would have been the best form?
post #52 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
"I will be fluent in English."
or i am going to be fluent better?
post #53 of 119
I am buying a tie at the end of the week. I will buy a tie at the end of the week. These two are pretty much the same, but it's safer to use the second form, because the first one can be tricky to use.
post #54 of 119
"I am going to be fluent in 2 weeks." "I will be fluent in 2 weeks" These are more or less the same, the first one is certainly more romance language based, but is still OK in english as well.
post #55 of 119
Quote:
for 180 hours paid at 99% by state.
I like this policy. It's a good thing -- along with your universal health care.
post #56 of 119
Quote:
I am buying a tie at the end of the week. I will buy a tie at the end of the week. These two are pretty much the same, but it's safer to use the second form, because the first one can be tricky to use.
Of course there is the diff. between shall and will too. Fowler's English is a good book the differences. Second ed. better than the third, I think.
post #57 of 119
Moi je trouve que vous vous debrouillez tres bien en anglais. Il faudrait que vous ayez des contacts avec des anglophones (en temps reel) pour que vous remarquiez de veritables ameliorations. Mais ces discussions sur internet sont aussi excellentes parce qu'elles "keep you on your toes". Je suppose que vous vous rendez parfois a Londres ? Ensuite, evidemment, il y a l'accent. Mais apres tout, pourquoi se casser la tete : les Americains aiment l'accent francais en anglais (allez y comprendre quelquechose .). Pour ref. : je reside aux US, mais je suis francaise et j'ai ete prof de francais et d'anglais. Les grosses difficultes des eleves francais a qui je donnais des cours d'anglais : les temps (surtout quand utiliser le progressif) et les "phrasal verbs" (du genre to take on, to take up, etc.). Et puis aussi les expressions idiomatiques, alors la, c'est un veritable guepier .
post #58 of 119
Thread Starter 
Merci des conseils. Mon anglais est tres moyen. I speak English in a fashion. Je me concentre justement sur les idioms et les phrasal verbs car c'est ce qui fait souvent la difference pour comprendre une personne. Je me balade avec un petit dictionnaire que je lis dans le métro. J'ai aussi un carnet dans lequel je note des mots utiles, ensuite à force de lire le carnet, je retiens les mots sans effort. Je sais aussi qu'il faut integrer les mots dans des phrases avec des mots que l'on connait dejà pour mieux les retenir. Et aussi toujours associer un mot avec son contraire pour le retenir plus vite.
post #59 of 119
Wow, you are dedicated. Mais attention a l'usage des expressions idiomatiques. C'est tentant de vouloir les utiliser, mais ca semble parfois artificiel. En anglais americain, certaines sont plus communes que d'autres. De nombreuses expressions, par exemple, proviennent du milieu des sports : To get to first base, to score, to hit a homerun, etc. Hang in there: I've been in the US for over a decade, and I'm sure I still make mistakes. But most Americans don't notice I'm French when I speak English (Wheww.)
post #60 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Wow, you are dedicated.  Mais attention a l'usage des expressions idiomatiques. C'est tentant de vouloir les utiliser, mais ca semble parfois artificiel. En anglais americain, certaines sont plus communes que d'autres. De nombreuses expressions, par exemple, proviennent du milieu des sports : To get to first base, to score, to hit a homerun, etc. Hang in there: I've been in the US for over a decade, and I'm sure I still make mistakes.  But most Americans don't notice I'm French when I speak English (Wheww.)
Artificiel? Surtout si on ne parle pas bien la langue. Et puis ca evolue sans cesse les idiom. To send to Coventry, does it mean something for you?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › English lessons