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Shoe Antiquing - Page 4

post #46 of 308
What was the charge for the antiquing service for the above pair?
post #47 of 308
Thread Starter 
Basic antiquing work with fresh uppers -

original sample

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finished 'Russet'

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original sample

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finished 'Antique Cordovan'

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original sample with just a polishing

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finished 'Mahagony'

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original sample with polishing

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finished 'Antique Bombay'

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post #48 of 308
Sweet.
post #49 of 308
Probably a stupid question, but how do you polish an antiqued shoe after subsequent wear? Would a clean and neutral polish sustain the antiquing effect?
post #50 of 308
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangfastic View Post
Probably a stupid question, but how do you polish an antiqued shoe after subsequent wear? Would a clean and neutral polish sustain the antiquing effect?

Not a stupid question at all. You can always use numerous different colors of polish for any shoe, just find what works for each pair and your tastes best. Same here - start a little darker and add some off-base colors, like Dark Green or Hermes Red. Another member here likes Blue on most of his shoes like this and I think that's a good suggestion as well.
post #51 of 308
i actually like that marbled look on the double-monks, i think it might even look intriguing if you brought it out a little more (without going over the top or anything).
post #52 of 308
wow! looks incredible. i may be sending you my new RL sheldons soon to darken the tan to a medium glowing brown/antique bombay. this may be another stupid question, but is it possible to lighten colors, such as take a black and make them a dark brown instead, or a dark brown to a lighter brown?
post #53 of 308
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by stickonatree View Post
wow! looks incredible. i may be sending you my new RL sheldons soon to darken the tan to a medium glowing brown/antique bombay.

this may be another stupid question, but is it possible to lighten colors, such as take a black and make them a dark brown instead, or a dark brown to a lighter brown?

Black I wouldn't mess with.....the Browns', maybe - depends on the leather. If it's something like an Allen Edmonds with very little finish, you can get it highlighted lighter without alot of problems. Many others, the final factory finish makes it difficult to assure the result bfore getting into them.
post #54 of 308
Thread Starter 
Had to bump this back up to show off a pair I am real happy with....Lobb's in a mid to dark brown calf that is just great leather to work with.

Plus, the order gave me a chance to try out a new technique I have in my formula book as 'antique black'.....basically a black/russet wash cut with 50% deglazer to give a transparent finish - don't try this at home without alot of practice!

Very gentle transition of tones -

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ps - no finish applied yet.....just the base coloration.
post #55 of 308
Fabulous! One of the few JLP that I would like for my rotation.
post #56 of 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post
don't try this at home without alot of practice!

They look beautiful.

One question. How exactly does one get practice without trying it at home?
post #57 of 308
Ron, just a spectacular result with those shoes (actually all the ones you've shown). I had one question: Since the antiquing is taking place via application of creams and polishes (the wax-based ones)--in addition, of course, to judicious use of alcohol and/or acetone (or substitutes for these)--will the finished antiquing be resistant to any destruction from future applications of creams and polish used in regular shoe-maintenance sessions? By this I mean will the antiqued finish be resistant to the dissolving effects of future applications that would normally eat into what lies underneath. If the latter occurred, in time the antiqued effect would be lost or smudged. One reason I like the Martegani (and other makers') Radica Calf and the John Lobb Museum Calf is that the antiqued effects are there before any finish buildup occurs. Still, EG applies their antiquing via a process that must be something like what you have done here, and their finishes seem impervious to destruction of the antiquing through future polishing. What are your thoughts on this?
post #58 of 308
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger View Post
Ron, just a spectacular result with those shoes (actually all the ones you've shown). I had one question: Since the antiquing is taking place via application of creams and polishes (the wax-based ones)--in addition, of course, to judicious use of alcohol and/or acetone (or substitutes for these)--will the finished antiquing be resistant to any destruction from future applications of creams and polish used in regular shoe-maintenance sessions? By this I mean will the antiqued finish be resistant to the dissolving effects of future applications that would normally eat into what lies underneath. If the latter occurred, in time the antiqued effect would be lost or smudged. One reason I like the Martegani (and other makers') Radica Calf and the John Lobb Museum Calf is that the antiqued effects are there before any finish buildup occurs. Still, EG applies their antiquing via a process that must be something like what you have done here, and their finishes seem impervious to destruction of the antiquing through future polishing. What are your thoughts on this?


Good question - and well stated, as usual Roger.

However, I DO NOT build my finishes with polish and wax - that method will not last long term (sorry to those that are doing this.....it actually might last, but certainly not to the degree someone like me can count on as dependable, for profit work). I also do not use acetone (not pure, anyway) either. Of course, I have been told that I have gone too far here in describing how I do things already (I disagree...this forum is to share idea's and methods, and I feel that - especially since I might be one of the most frequent users of this forum to market my own merchandise - that all of us with something to say in this regard have an obligation to do so), and I don't know if I should say 100% of everything I use, but anyone with access to Fiebings dye, a little analine powder to mix in, De-glazer from Angelus, sponge brushes from Home Depot, daubers, rags, silk, felt, DENIM, elbow grease, patience, time, interest and a good collection of trial shoes can achieve very similiar results. There, of course, are techniques that only ruining shoes can teach, but for the most part this process is not hard.

Yes, my finishes will hold up to routine shoe care polishing and waxing.....as well as the elements. I would take it one step further and say that, after we get through with them, the shoes will actually be better able to handle these things.

That's why this aint free !
post #59 of 308
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

razor blade to carve away the grain leaving a rough finish and a metal file, heavy grit, to rough up the upper so the darker dye settles in in swirls.

Rider have you finished working on this pair? I am curious to see the final result.
post #60 of 308
Amazing antique work rider!
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