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Shoe Antiquing - Page 30

post #436 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by alford78 View Post


On the darkest parts where it's like black looking and really polished on the toes, what colors and what products gave these results? I was following along on your previous post on the process which helped really picture how the shoe slowly was being transformed but the dark spots are what I'm trying to figure out how to do, or should say how you got to that point I guess?

Very nice shoe btw!

Alford the darker tones are a compound of colors. Using variations of darker reds and and some navy also. Be careful of using the navy though, as navy and red make a purple color which can ruin the affect of what you are trying to achieve. To polish I used saphir creams and a saphir wax. A high shine was not requested on these so creams were sufficient mostly. You can use a black cream on the toes if you want a darker look.

post #437 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

Alford the darker tones are a compound of colors. Using variations of darker reds and and some navy also. Be careful of using the navy though, as navy and red make a purple color which can ruin the affect of what you are trying to achieve. To polish I used saphir creams and a saphir wax. A high shine was not requested on these so creams were sufficient mostly. You can use a black cream on the toes if you want a darker look.

Ok great. So how many layers/colors of dyeing before switching to creams in general like for a basic two/three tone like that?

Thanks for helping. I'm going to practice on some cheap shoes from Dillard's here soon but not so cheap that won't wear them I will add. Don't want to put all the time in and not be able to enjoy some.
post #438 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by alford78 View Post


Ok great. So how many layers/colors of dyeing before switching to creams in general like for a basic two/three tone like that?

Thanks for helping. I'm going to practice on some cheap shoes from Dillard's here soon but not so cheap that won't wear them I will add. Don't want to put all the time in and not be able to enjoy some.

How many layers can vary depending on what effect you want and the leather quality. The shoes I did probably had maybe 7- 9 layers on them before the creams were used.   Creams and waxes are used to polish and enhance the color of the shoes. Unfortunately there is no exact method as every shoe is different. Its just trial and error and everyone has there own methods. 

post #439 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

I wouldn't suggest trying to strip off black.....if you are simply wanting to add a little violet color to the boots I'd say go right to the self shine color dyes that are out there. Just go the Amazon and search 'self shine color dye' and you should see plenty of options. The Tarrago is the best, but I am biased.

These products are simple to use, very effective, and good to provide highlights of more extreme colors in small area's.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

The process is basically correct, although there is no need to thin out Feibings. Also, the quality of the shoe will greatly influence the result - the better the shoe, the better the result - so keep in mind the process on a 'cheap' shoe (don't know what you are working on) will be the same but the result much different on, say, an EG.

Also, the amount of color you want to effect will depend on the creams you are using. Simply using various Feibings dye will not provide any sharp contrast in colors - when you apply another coat to an original, you are, in effect, reactivating the previous and blending it. You have to use a mixed process of dye and pigmented creams to get a result. If you are using the Saphir MDO creams, you will get a lot of pigment penetration.....others, not so much (including Blue Label Saphir).

It's been awhile since I have seen this thread come back up, so it might be worth mentioning that my original posts were fairly straight forward, dark to light same color refinishing. Now, there are so many people doing it, and taking it to another level of color mixtures, that the process I described usually won't give the same effect. The addition of fashion colors and blending them into the refinishing work is always achieved now by the use of the resin self shine creams and quick color liquids that used to be marketed only to shoe repair shops, but now can be found on-line. These products come in tons of colors, and are a neat way to make a unique look, if only used in small segments.

So are you saying that using the water based products are the new and fast way or am I just not seeing any of the alcohol based products in my searches? How would the leather breathe and wouldn't the water based dyes produce a different texture than all the other areas on the shoe that was done using the alcohol products?

Have my first practice pair of shoes and a bunch of products mentioned earlier in the thread but can always order more if the new stuff/method will be easier/better.
post #440 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by alford78 View Post


So are you saying that using the water based products are the new and fast way or am I just not seeing any of the alcohol based products in my searches? How would the leather breathe and wouldn't the water based dyes produce a different texture than all the other areas on the shoe that was done using the alcohol products?

Have my first practice pair of shoes and a bunch of products mentioned earlier in the thread but can always order more if the new stuff/method will be easier/better.

The saphir dyes and also fiebings dyes are alcohol based. Alcahol based dyes are better to use as the penetrate better than water based dyes in my opinion. I'm not sure what you mean by the water based creating different textures as this is done based of the leather type. You can purchase leather paint which will give you a different texture but I don't recommend using these.
post #441 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

The saphir dyes and also fiebings dyes are alcohol based. Alcahol based dyes are better to use as the penetrate better than water based dyes in my opinion. I'm not sure what you mean by the water based creating different textures as this is done based of the leather type. You can purchase leather paint which will give you a different texture but I don't recommend using these.

I was just talking about what I quoted as he mentioned how the Tarrago is best, self shine color dye in his opinion. When I looked at the product it seemed more like paint than dye which surprised me. That's why I posted this because it caught me off guard once I started trying to find the products he mentioned were new.

This is a quote directly from Tarrago's site about the texture of the dye.

"The leather gets smooth and flexible and dye will not peel."

It looks like patent leather to me when I searched videos and completely different than alcohol dyes. More like a coating or paint.

I've ordered all the Saphir creams and waxes along with a few different brands of dyes but was going to try to find the products Rider mentioned in his last couple posts before I started my first project. That's when I noticed the products were water based which threw me for a loop since I didn't see how these could be considered better/easier than the alcohol dyes.
post #442 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by alford78 View Post


I was just talking about what I quoted as he mentioned how the Tarrago is best, self shine color dye in his opinion. When I looked at the product it seemed more like paint than dye which surprised me. That's why I posted this because it caught me off guard once I started trying to find the products he mentioned were new.

This is a quote directly from Tarrago's site about the texture of the dye.

"The leather gets smooth and flexible and dye will not peel."

It looks like patent leather to me when I searched videos and completely different than alcohol dyes. More like a coating or paint.

I've ordered all the Saphir creams and waxes along with a few different brands of dyes but was going to try to find the products Rider mentioned in his last couple posts before I started my first project. That's when I noticed the products were water based which threw me for a loop since I didn't see how these could be considered better/easier than the alcohol.

The tarrago products are like painting on a canvas where it sits on top of the leather. hence when they say "flexible" it moves with the leather and doesn't crack. It will not polish well or age well like alcohol based dyes. Rider was probably meaning these are easier as there is like 90 colors you can chose from. You don't have to worry about the blending of dyes and compounding colors like with alcohol based dyes. This is why they consider dying shoes with alcohol based products the most difficult. 

post #443 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

The tarrago products are like painting on a canvas where it sits on top of the leather. hence when they say "flexible" it moves with the leather and doesn't crack. It will not polish well or age well like alcohol based dyes. Rider was probably meaning these are easier as there is like 90 colors you can chose from. You don't have to worry about the blending of dyes and compounding colors like with alcohol based dyes. This is why they consider dying shoes with alcohol based products the most difficult. 

Ok. Good to know I can quit searching for alcohol based products in the categories he mentioned. I just figured since he was the one that started the thread and then came back to answer a question regarding the antiquing process with alcohol dyes but then mentioned how with today's products could change the process. I just figured he would have mentioned how they are completely different and more like paint which to me would be a "no no" since the leather would eventually dry out, correct?

I'm an artist by DNA lol. Just inherited it so can picture the dyeing process being harder for sure but it will also produce a better result with practice I would imagine.

Thanks for the clarification!!!
post #444 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

Here is a new one. I really need a better camera as it was hard to pick up on the colors in the shoe.

Before


After

I like this one. Sponges to achieve mottled effect?

post #445 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by jokb View Post

I like this one. Sponges to achieve mottled effect?

Not quite. I actually use small brushes to go over the shoe. It takes forever but you can control ane introduce more colors that way. I do use and have used sponges before though just not on this particular shoe.
post #446 of 490
Me being stupid and just working away on shoes I forgot to take a before picture so I'm just using the stock manufacture photo.

Before



After



post #447 of 490
Ok. I think I'm about ready to start practicing except I still have one more question.

Rider mentioned aniline powder but that's all he did was mention it. How is this used and do any of you use it either by itself or mixed with other dyes? I understand how it could help blending layers of colors but not sure on how it's applied? Any and all tips on using it or not using it would be greatly appreciated. Any certain brands would also be helpful as most don't really have very detailed instructions from what I can tell?

I'm getting really anxious to start practicing on some scrap leather and cheap shoes. I am somewhat decent at finishing wood and have built my own full bar with built in cooler, ice machine, kegerator, sink, etc... along with some furniture. Working with wood has always been a relaxing/stress relieving venture and hope that leather working will be just as fun. Getting all my notes and materials ready has me wanting to just jump right in but I keep reading little bits that need to learn more about way I'm totally prepared for any option I may want to try.
post #448 of 490
To be honest alford78 you just need to get stuck in and do it. You can read all the information you want and you will still make mistakes. If you are trying to learn everything before you start you will go crazy. Most of us on here have learned many things over the years and some it you just need to experience to get better. This may sound a little harsh but there is no better learning than hands on.
post #449 of 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellowevo84 View Post

To be honest alford78 you just need to get stuck in and do it. You can read all the information you want and you will still make mistakes. If you are trying to learn everything before you start you will go crazy. Most of us on here have learned many things over the years and some it you just need to experience to get better. This may sound a little harsh but there is no better learning than hands on.
Oh not harsh at all and I totally agree. It's just taken time to get all the products and scrap leather/test shoes etc... And then the aniline powder bit just popped in my head. Wouldn't it add like depth/ translucence?

Do you use it or can say the benefits or drawbacks of using it with dyes? Wouldn't it add
post #450 of 490
I don't use it
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