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Shoe Antiquing - Page 20

post #286 of 309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by john101 View Post

Hi Guys, i'm new to this forum and just read up on the antiquing techniques used here. I must say i am very inspired by some of your works and i'm so gonna try it on some cheap leather shoes. However, i thought firstly i would like to clarify the usual steps involved so that we don't end up doing a blotched job. It would be great if someone could point me in the right direction with what i know so far.

From what i know, the steps involved are:

1. Remove previous dye and polish with a deglazer/accetone probably with Angelus deglazer
2. Nourish leather with a creme such as Saphir Renovateur then wait 10-15 mins
3. Mix Feibing leather dye with dye thinner and paint shoes in desired color making sure we paint in thin layers.
4. Let paint dry for 15-20mins then wipe hard with a cotton cloth to remove/prevent dye from caking.
5. Repeat steps 3-4 till desired hand painted color is achieved therefore ending up with a few layers of paint
6.Using a creme polish of same, different or mixing colors depending on desired outcome and do multiple layers of polish.
7.Repeat step 6 but this time round polish with wax to achieve a high shine

Does anyone have any additional steps to add in or correct the procedure that i wrote? I hope everyone will this useful. And what type of dye do you guys normally use from Feibing? Is there any difference between using the water based dye vs the normal dye? Thanks!!!
icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

The process is basically correct, although there is no need to thin out Feibings. Also, the quality of the shoe will greatly influence the result - the better the shoe, the better the result - so keep in mind the process on a 'cheap' shoe (don't know what you are working on) will be the same but the result much different on, say, an EG.

Also, the amount of color you want to effect will depend on the creams you are using. Simply using various Feibings dye will not provide any sharp contrast in colors - when you apply another coat to an original, you are, in effect, reactivating the previous and blending it. You have to use a mixed process of dye and pigmented creams to get a result. If you are using the Saphir MDO creams, you will get a lot of pigment penetration.....others, not so much (including Blue Label Saphir).

It's been awhile since I have seen this thread come back up, so it might be worth mentioning that my original posts were fairly straight forward, dark to light same color refinishing. Now, there are so many people doing it, and taking it to another level of color mixtures, that the process I described usually won't give the same effect. The addition of fashion colors and blending them into the refinishing work is always achieved now by the use of the resin self shine creams and quick color liquids that used to be marketed only to shoe repair shops, but now can be found on-line. These products come in tons of colors, and are a neat way to make a unique look, if only used in small segments.
post #287 of 309
Here are a couple I have done in the past few months. Pretty much everything in this thread is spot on. If using acetone, do it outside.
Shoe antiquing is a slow rewarding process!

The first pair is just a cheap pair, I wanted to see if I could change the entire coloring and set the antiquing into the leather. It took a lot of work but I think I figured out how to take color back out and lighten up the toe area. I am happy with the results.

The last pair are Borgioli, they were a deep reddish color, the toe is all colored into the leather and I basically set the rest to a mid brown. I am super happy with the results on these. I have several more pair I have done, but have not been bothered to take pics.

Thoughts?





post #288 of 309
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by antirabbit View Post

Here are a couple I have done in the past few months. Pretty much everything in this thread is spot on. If using acetone, do it outside.
Shoe antiquing is a slow rewarding process!

The first pair is just a cheap pair, I wanted to see if I could change the entire coloring and set the antiquing into the leather. It took a lot of work but I think I figured out how to take color back out and lighten up the toe area. I am happy with the results.

The last pair are Borgioli, they were a deep reddish color, the toe is all colored into the leather and I basically set the rest to a mid brown. I am super happy with the results on these. I have several more pair I have done, but have not been bothered to take pics.

Thoughts?






Excellent - especially the Borgioli's.
post #289 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by antirabbit View Post

Here are a couple I have done in the past few months. Pretty much everything in this thread is spot on. If using acetone, do it outside.
Shoe antiquing is a slow rewarding process!

The first pair is just a cheap pair, I wanted to see if I could change the entire coloring and set the antiquing into the leather. It took a lot of work but I think I figured out how to take color back out and lighten up the toe area. I am happy with the results.

The last pair are Borgioli, they were a deep reddish color, the toe is all colored into the leather and I basically set the rest to a mid brown. I am super happy with the results on these. I have several more pair I have done, but have not been bothered to take pics.

Thoughts?






Both good but the Borgiolis are something else.

I think the green ones had their surface too brutalised and you lost the top layer. This is always a problem with taking shoes back to base. Chapping the top layer. Sometimes the wax still brings it back but after a lot of effort.
post #290 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Both good but the Borgiolis are something else.

I think the green ones had their surface too brutalised and you lost the top layer. This is always a problem with taking shoes back to base. Chapping the top layer. Sometimes the wax still brings it back but after a lot of effort.

 

Yes.  Therefore my suggestion of waiting until the leather surface dried out.

post #291 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post

Here is round 2 of my Alden Medallion Cap Toes. I have enough boring colored shoes, that I wanted them to look a little interesting. Not really satisfied with how it came out, so I'm thinking of starting over again (for the 3rd time). Opinions?

These are awesome! I want to try this with some beaters in an orangish tan that I never use, and I love the mottled effect. How does one obtain this?
post #292 of 309

 

 

 

Here are the photos of the Romano Martegani shoes before deglazing. I didn't properly care for the shoes because I didn't wear them often. Maybe a total of six times since purchase them used.

 

 

Before applying Fiebings Deglazer. After deglazing applied 2 rounds of leather rejuvenate on both

shoe to condition and prepare the leather for burnishing (antiquing)

 

 

 

After deglazing and two coats of British Tan leather dye. Notice that after 

2 coats of leather dye the shoes already looks 110% better compared to what 

I started with.

 

 

 

Here's what the first round of burnishing a single shoe looks like after a total of 

three layers of Chocolate leather dye over the British Tan base color.

In between layers I would apply leather rejuvenate before moving on to the other shoe. Notice that the shoe is taking on a

a deep multi color brownish tone with a slight bit of shine. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stage 3 - Darkening before lightening the tones of dark chocalate. 

 

The shine/sheen is from Lexol leather conditioner.  Two rounds of conditioning,

and buffing.  The stage I will be creating a true barnished/antiquing of the shoe 

by removing some of the darker shaded are to lighten up color texture.  Then

applying another round contitioner before adding a very thin layer of oxblood.

 

 

 

I am 3/4 finished. I decided to wear the shoes to work today to see what kind of feed back/compliments I would receive.  I got a few compliments from female co-workers.  They couldn't believe that I did the work myself.  


Edited by PointDexter2014 - 8/14/13 at 5:26pm
post #293 of 309

Below are photos of a used pair of shoes that used to be deep dark brown.  I antiqued/barnished them to 2 tone.  I love them regardless of good or bad feedback.

 

 

post #294 of 309

they need serious polishing.  right now they look dyed but no shine.

post #295 of 309

I know they need a shine.  I purchased a shoe shine kit

 

 

 

 

 

 

and I motorized shoe shine toe.  

 

 

I appreciate the need back.

post #296 of 309
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

The addition of fashion colors and blending them into the refinishing work is always achieved now by the use of the resin self shine creams and quick color liquids that used to be marketed only to shoe repair shops, but now can be found on-line. These products come in tons of colors, and are a neat way to make a unique look, if only used in small segments.

During which steps are the resin self shine creams used and what product are they being used in lieu of (which product was used previously) please?
post #297 of 309

Today I made my first attempt at a full patina, I used fiebing dyes.  I stripped my shoes with the Fiebing deglazer and started with a layer of navy blue, then I went back with a mixture of black and navy blue, I did a dark red on the toe, tounge and front of the vamp then went back over it with a navy blue.  All I have to do now is apply some Saphir renovateur and polish. I think it came out pretty good for my first attempt.  

post #298 of 309

I love the green pair. Very nice

post #299 of 309
Anyone have experience using acrylic (water based) self shine dyes like Tarrago?

In my haste, I went and purchased a number of Tarrago self shine dyes. Then I realized that this thread is based on using alcohol based/soluble dyes (and alcohol soluble pastes and waxes) to achieve the desired depth and antiquing. Would one use water to smooth out/blend the finish? Do you still apply (alcohol soluble) creams and waxes between coats? Or should I simply try to return the Acrylic dyes and get alcohol based dyes?

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
post #300 of 309
If you look back early in this thread Ron talks about how between each coat of dye he conditions, which counteracts the drying effects of alcohol and also picks up excess dye. Alcohol dyes are used because the alcohol evaporates leaving the dye behind. Acrylic dye would literally cover up the grain and won't allow the finish to be translucent. There would be no depth, no grain, just a paint job. Also, it would allow the leather to breathe, or accept conditioners. It would choke it out so to speak. I would suspect it would also begin to crack at flex points and such. Acrylic can be diluted with water, but once the water dries it is completely hard and totally water repellant.
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