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Honeymoon in London, Paris, Rome advice - Page 6

post #76 of 85
One of the things I'd do in London is see some live theatre one evening. Also, the pubs that the Savile Row tailors frequent in the afternoons (esp. on friday) are The Windmill, and Mulligan's Oyster Bar on Cork Street (according to Thomas Mahone anyways). Brick Lane in the East End also has a lot of vintage/independent fashion shops. I haven't really had the chance to spend more than a few days in London previously, and I'm not sure what I'd do on a honeymoon trip... But since it's your last stop, maybe some good live music at a small club would be a cool option. London = good music imo.
post #77 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkennett View Post
One of the things I'd do in London is see some live theatre one evening. Also, the pubs that the Savile Row tailors frequent in the afternoons (esp. on friday) are The Windmill, and Mulligan's Oyster Bar on Cork Street (according to Thomas Mahone anyways). Brick Lane in the East End also has a lot of vintage/independent fashion shops. I haven't really had the chance to spend more than a few days in London previously, and I'm not sure what I'd do on a honeymoon trip... But since it's your last stop, maybe some good live music at a small club would be a cool option. London = good music imo.

Live music in London = Camden Town...

Maybe I am biased though, I live around the corner in Primrose Hill
post #78 of 85
Don't forget to see Jim Morrison's gravesite.
post #79 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02 View Post
I can highly, highly recommend the place around the corner where there were no other tourists and all the locals were drunk and singing along with the 70 year old guy in the front of the room. I'll see if I can find the card.

Tom

Da Carlone, in Trastevere. Best night we had in Rome.
post #80 of 85
Thread Starter 
For those who travel frequently....how easy it is to withdraw cash with a USA atm card?

I was thinking of bringing a decent amount in cash, but in case I needed more paper notes what are the options for getting it?
post #81 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
For those who travel frequently....how easy it is to withdraw cash with a USA atm card?
Very.
post #82 of 85
I find that ATMs are generally the best way to get cash in foreign countries. There are some that charge a fee, but most dont.

Check your bank to see if they have any fees on their their side (sometimes a few percent). Sometimes they will waive for a period. BoA did it for me when I was moving to Europe

K
post #83 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
For those who travel frequently....how easy it is to withdraw cash with a USA atm card?

I was thinking of bringing a decent amount in cash, but in case I needed more paper notes what are the options for getting it?
Really easy. If you have a Bank of America acct. you can withdraw w/o fees from any BNP atms in Paris or any place in France.
post #84 of 85
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
For those who travel frequently....how easy it is to withdraw cash with a USA atm card?

I was thinking of bringing a decent amount in cash, but in case I needed more paper notes what are the options for getting it?

Use Capital One card they do not charge for currency conversion. Check your PIN code . ATM's in Europe accept maximum 4 digit PIN codes. If you have a longer PIN ,you are out of luck.
post #85 of 85
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkzzzz View Post
Use Capital One card they do not charge for currency conversion. Check your PIN code . ATM's in Europe accept maximum 4 digit PIN codes. If you have a longer PIN ,you are out of luck.


thanks, that's what Ive heard and I do have a Cap1 card (and 4 digit pin on ATM)
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