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How Good Is or Isn't Magnanni As a Dress Shoe? - Page 2

post #16 of 26
theyre like the Toyota Camry of shoes. doesn't offend anyone, quality is good enough, but ultimately blah
post #17 of 26

Agree for the most part but then again the $200 - $500 price point for the Magnanni's is probably better than 95% of what the average joe has.

 

But this is SF so the caliber is indeed much greater.

 

bigstar[1].gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HRoi View Post

theyre like the Toyota Camry of shoes. doesn't offend anyone, quality is good enough, but ultimately blah
post #18 of 26

My first "real" dress shoes were a pair of Magnanni 4-eyelet cognac bluchers, which I still wear frequently. I've had my cobbler put topys on the soles, but other than that, some regular care has kept them looking almost brand new after 2 years, a LOT of wears (as I didn't have much of a shoe rotation) and quite a bit of abuse. They were €150, and we didn't have Meermin back then. Can't really complain...

post #19 of 26

I recently bought two pairs of Magnanni's from Nordstrom, the "Miro" and "Marco".  One is a grayish single monk strap while the other is a tobacco double monk strap. Looking through the website my eyes were repeatedly drawn to the Magnanni's.  The styling was fashion forward and classy, and in person my thoughts were confirmed.  The shoe was built sturdy with average to good quality leather.  They were a little stiff when tried on but still comfortable.  The stiffness will go away with wear.  The soles were leather which is nice to see. Some the of high end companies are going with rubber soles on their loafers which makes them throw aways pretty much.  Um Ferragamo not to mention names.  Where was I.. I have a problem with shoes rubbing under my right ankle and these did just that.  However, I knew with some working of the leather around the opening this too would be okay.  I loved the shoes so much I bought them.  My first pairs of Magnanni's.  I own both Gucci and LouisVuitton shoes, and they wear softer and fit the foot better thus the higher price point.  My Gucci shoes are the most comfortable shoes I own and the leather is super soft, but for the $300 price point I am happy with Magnanni.  To Boot New York makes a nice shoe with a similar price point but I didn't like their monk strap offerings.

post #20 of 26

I stumbled across this old thread today and I want to throw in my two cents.  Comparing Magnanni to Allen Edmonds or any other goodyear welted shoe is about as useful as comparing them to wolverine boots when it comes to quality of construction.  Magnanni uses Bolognese (not Blake) construction whereas AE uses the already mentioned goodyear welt.  People get overly excited about goodyear welted shoes because they're easy to resole and therefore people think they're "better quality".  This simply isn't true.  Bolognese construction can still be resoled easily as mentioned by RIDER in this post http://www.styleforum.net/t/17074/what-is-bologna-construction.  Also, the Bolognese construction makes the shoe extremely light, sleek, and comfortable.

 

Personally I love the Magnannis as I find they are more comfortable and stylish than the AE's. 

 

Oh and another company that uses Bolognese Construction is Testoni - just for any of those who think that one is inherently higher quality than the other.  http://www.testoni.com/en-US/the_bolognese_construction.aspx

post #21 of 26
I own both
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosho View Post

I recently bought two pairs of Magnanni's from Nordstrom, the "Miro" and "Marco".  One is a grayish single monk strap while the other is a tobacco double monk strap. Looking through the website my eyes were repeatedly drawn to the Magnanni's.  The styling was fashion forward and classy, and in person my thoughts were confirmed.  The shoe was built sturdy with average to good quality leather.  They were a little stiff when tried on but still comfortable.  The stiffness will go away with wear.  The soles were leather which is nice to see. Some the of high end companies are going with rubber soles on their loafers which makes them throw aways pretty much.  Um Ferragamo not to mention names.  Where was I.. I have a problem with shoes rubbing under my right ankle and these did just that.  However, I knew with some working of the leather around the opening this too would be okay.  I loved the shoes so much I bought them.  My first pairs of Magnanni's.  I own both Gucci and LouisVuitton shoes, and they wear softer and fit the foot better thus the higher price point.  My Gucci shoes are the most comfortable shoes I own and the leather is super soft, but for the $300 price point I am happy with Magnanni.  To Boot New York makes a nice shoe with a similar price point but I didn't like their monk strap offerings.

i own both of those magnanni shoes as well and am pleased with the quality at the price point.
post #22 of 26
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatguy0327 View Post
 

I stumbled across this old thread today and I want to throw in my two cents.  Comparing Magnanni to Allen Edmonds or any other goodyear welted shoe is about as useful as comparing them to wolverine boots when it comes to quality of construction.  Magnanni uses Bolognese (not Blake) construction whereas AE uses the already mentioned goodyear welt.  People get overly excited about goodyear welted shoes because they're easy to resole and therefore people think they're "better quality".  This simply isn't true.  Bolognese construction can still be resoled easily as mentioned by RIDER in this post http://www.styleforum.net/t/17074/what-is-bologna-construction.  Also, the Bolognese construction makes the shoe extremely light, sleek, and comfortable.

 

Personally I love the Magnannis as I find they are more comfortable and stylish than the AE's. 

 

Oh and another company that uses Bolognese Construction is Testoni - just for any of those who think that one is inherently higher quality than the other.  http://www.testoni.com/en-US/the_bolognese_construction.aspx

 

I am stumbling onto this old thread too. I too agree that people put too much focus on shoe construction. I for one never had the sole of a shoe replaced and nor do I intend to do so ever. I have no problem throwing away a fully used up pair of shoes and buying new ones.

 

I have just acquired a couple of Magnannis, and I love the styling. They are nice, sleek, and comfortable indeed. These shoes are like slim fit attires - they are not for everybody and you need to have the height and slim physic to pull it off.

 

Buying shoes just so they last you 20 years is doing it wrong. That is unless you lived through the great depression. Refresh your style every 5 to 10 years and enjoy the process.

post #24 of 26
As far as Magnanni, they're okay in my book. Not a great shoe, but not bad at all.
Edited by Beancooker - 1/2/15 at 7:02am
post #25 of 26

Magnanni shoes are hand made in Spain. They are truly a work of art. You get compliments mostly from fine high class women not from men who don't know shit. They are the La Ferrari of shoes.

post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by shoemaker101 View Post

Magnanni shoes are hand made in Spain. They are truly a work of art. You get compliments mostly from fine high class women not from men who don't know shit. They are the La Ferrari of shoes.

Most on this Forum have a stricter definition of handmaking shoes than you do. It's true that Bologna constructed shoes like Magnanni are not bad, but one can do much better..
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