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Kitchen Knives - Page 27

post #391 of 430
Quote:

+1, that's the book that got my hooked on kitchen knives too. A great point he makes is that you really only need about 3 knives, a chef's knife (gyuto), paring knife, and bread knife. (I probably use my sujihiki more than my parer though.) If you're using your gyuto 95% of the time, it makes the most sense to spend the most on that knife.
post #392 of 430
i might add an utility knife. i find i use my utility knife for everything unless i need a long edge
post #393 of 430
Japanese Knife Porn Great site - just get yourself lost in it.
post #394 of 430
Quote:

Thank you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

+1, that's the book that got my hooked on kitchen knives too. A great point he makes is that you really only need about 3 knives, a chef's knife (gyuto), paring knife, and bread knife. (I probably use my sujihiki more than my parer though.) If you're using your gyuto 95% of the time, it makes the most sense to spend the most on that knife.

This is great info.

So, 3-4 knives in all?

And you would use the chef's knife on cutting everything from vegetables to meat?
post #395 of 430
i'd get the best quality gyuto you could afford, a decent but good value paring knife, and a really cheap bread knife.

and if you weren't getting a petty/utility knife then yeah. almost everything with the gyuto
post #396 of 430
Cheers.
post #397 of 430
post #398 of 430
Read about this brand in a Tasting Table email this morning, does anyone have any experience with or opinions on windmuehlen knives?

154

http://store.kaufmann-mercantile.com/collections/kitchen-home/products/windmuehlenmesser-carbon-steel-chefs-knife
post #399 of 430
I'm not trying to be (too much of) a dick, but what are you guys looking for in a knife? If you cook casually, and aren't knife obsessed, most of the money on the knives discussed itt would be wasted. If you just like well designed, well made things, then more power to you. God knows I do. Still, the difference in performance between a Forschner and a $600 knife is rather minimal for almost every task. Not that it keeps me from buying knives, but anyway.
post #400 of 430
Especially imprecise German style knives.

274
post #401 of 430
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I'm not trying to be (too much of) a dick, but what are you guys looking for in a knife? If you cook casually, and aren't knife obsessed, most of the money on the knives discussed itt would be wasted. If you just like well designed, well made things, then more power to you. God knows I do. Still, the difference in performance between a Forschner and a $600 knife is rather minimal for almost every task. Not that it keeps me from buying knives, but anyway.
I dunno. I found Shun a great leap up from Henkel, and Kikiuchi a significant leap up from Shun.
post #402 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I'm not trying to be (too much of) a dick, but what are you guys looking for in a knife? If you cook casually, and aren't knife obsessed, most of the money on the knives discussed itt would be wasted. If you just like well designed, well made things, then more power to you. God knows I do. Still, the difference in performance between a Forschner and a $600 knife is rather minimal for almost every task. Not that it keeps me from buying knives, but anyway.

Amen, brother. My wife gave me a Forschner 10" chefs with a rosewood handle twelve years ago. Over that time I've been in a multitude of knife shops from Germany, France, Japan, and of course in the U.S. and realize that it would be redundant to get a "higher end" one.
post #403 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I dunno. I found Shun a great leap up from Henkel, and Kikiuchi a significant leap up from Shun.
You have a pretty high level of skill, though.
post #404 of 430
Also my experience has been that the Forschners have been very easy to sharpen, and that actually is quite important for those who are not experienced with sharpening or feel in someway intimidated by it all. A knife's quality, craftsmanship, and its feel in the hand means absolutely nothing if it is dull.
post #405 of 430
^you just have to sharpen it a lot more often
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