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Kitchen Knives - Page 15

post #211 of 430
Who said anything about 390? Why would you need a 15 inch knife?
post #212 of 430
270mm may be too big for a first "better" chef's knife. I would look at 210mm Gyutou or a smaller Santoku. Sight unseen, the Tojiro DP ($68 at Korin for 210mm) and Togiharu molybdenum ($59 at Korin for 210mm) are solid entry level Japanese chef knife choices. If you have to see it in person, outside of NYC and San Francisco, you may be limited to Shun. The Shun Classic 8" chef's is $120 at W-S and is a very good knife. You also get Shun's excellent support and free lifetime send-away sharpening.
post #213 of 430
Would you really advise someone to get a Santoku? That just strikes me so.... Food Network-ey.
post #214 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I'd get a Masamoto VG Series Gyuto.
Personally I'd get the 210 mm knife, but you may want to opt for the 240 or 270 depending on personal preferences. 270 mm is just over 10.5 inches, 240 is about 9.5, and 210 is 8.25.


And that's why with that rec, I think you need to actually eat at Church & State next time you're in LA.
post #215 of 430
Goodwill Hydraulics Pvt. Ltd. is one of the leading manufacturers of Hydraulics fittings, Minimess Test Point Hoses and Fittings & Hose Assemblies.
post #216 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rambo View Post
Wusthof's are great knives. Sharpen them up and they'll be good as new. Like Thomas said, if the cooking is good, who gives a fuck what type of knife you use? I split time between a $30 Forschner and a $120 Global and I've found no difference except for the handle shape and weight.

SAME.

Across my Forschner and my solingen full forged knife, due to maintenance and upkeep, they cut the same. difference obviously being balance and comfort


good rec on the masamoto up there... masahiro a good alternative too
post #217 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
I'd get a Masamoto VG Series Gyuto. (...) The entire VG series is hyper molybdenum vanadium stainless steel. Full tang, with black handle. The knives get incredibly sharp, but also hold an edge through a lot of wear and tear, in case you don't know how or are intimidated about sharpening your own. It's not exactly "entry level" but it's very nice for the price.
Masamoto is getting a lot of good press lately; now I can't find one. Although, there is still the Misono UX-10: highly regarded.
post #218 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Would you really advise someone to get a Santoku? That just strikes me so.... Food Network-ey.
What's wrong with Santokus? Do they promote them a lot there? I don't really watch TV much. I'm suggesting a Santoku as an option. It all comes down to personal preferences, what size knife you are comfortable using and how large your cutting board is. Santokus mostly come in shorter sizes so if the standard 210mm Chef's is too large a 190mm Santoku may just fit the bill. I use my 190mm santoku all the time when using a smaller cutting board. Is there a reason you recommended Masamoto over less expensive knives? I hessitate to recommend "mid-range" knifes to first time Japanese knife buyers fearing a price shock.
post #219 of 430
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Who said anything about 390? Why would you need a 15 inch knife?

Check the link. For just over $500, you could get one of your own!
post #220 of 430
I almost circumcised myself with my bargain basement Calphalon chef's knife (marshall's, about $10) the other day. Thing is so heavy and sharp, think I am putting it away and sticking with my Costco henckels.
post #221 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dmax View Post
What's wrong with Santokus? Do they promote them a lot there? I don't really watch TV much.
Yes, basically. I use mine from time to time, but everytime you turn on the food network every "chef" is using a santoku for every kitchen task, and that's when EVERYONE in America started using santokus for everything from breaking down sides of beef to getting a brunoise on celery.

Quote:
Is there a reason you recommended Masamoto over less expensive knives?
I hessitate to recommend "mid-range" knifes to first time Japanese knife buyers fearing a price shock.
Just for the sole purpose that I've used one and absolutely loved it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post
Check the link. For just over $500, you could get one of your own!

NICE!
post #222 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Yes, basically. I use mine from time to time, but everytime you turn on the food network every "chef" is using a santoku for every kitchen task, and that's when EVERYONE in America started using santokus for everything from breaking down sides of beef to getting a brunoise on celery.

Yeah, Mrs. Thomas
Only wanted the Wusthof -
"Rachel uses it"

It's statements like that
makes me doubt my choice in wives
..."does Rachel approve?"
post #223 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Yes, basically. I use mine from time to time, but everytime you turn on the food network every "chef" is using a santoku for every kitchen task, and that's when EVERYONE in America started using santokus for everything from breaking down sides of beef to getting a brunoise on celery.

I use one to cut shoes in half.
post #224 of 430
i tried santokus and really didn't like them. they seemed too small and light to use as a chef's knife. some really good cooks disagree, so .... of course, they're all girls (no, i mean literally ... maybe it's a smaller hand thing). i love my japanese knife, but as I posted earlier, over a period of years i've gradually reverted to my old wusthoff for everyday chopping. eta: one advantage of wusthoff is that it is so commonly available that you can easily compare lengths and find the one that fits you best.
post #225 of 430
I find santokus to be a feminine knife. The chef knife/gyutos have a nice curve to blade so slicing is easier and can support a rocking motion.

A santoku has a flatter curve so think it's better for a push cut and slicing. Since it's shorter, it can be more managable for most people.

Whatever my viewpoints are, a santoku is traditionally an all-purpose knife so who is one to argue it's merits. It was the japanese version of a chef's knife
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