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Kitchen Knives - Page 10

post #136 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post
You might want to get another opinion. I just bought a stone for my MAC knife from a great Japanese hand tool and knife speciality store and they were very adamant that I never use a steel ceramic or otherwise. I have been led to believe that with the Japanese knives you are in fact honing the edge and due to the somewhat brittle nature of the steel you don't want to steel it at all. Are you in the Bay Area? If so stop by Hida tool in North Berkeley http://www.hidatool.com/ If you like high end hand tools they are awesome. Well worth a look 'round.
I've heard about them, I will call them up tomorrow. I'm actually in Sac. I've been reading things all over the map... do this... don't do this... frustrating, I'll just have to settle on a method and see what works best. I've been ordering my knives from www.sonomacutlery.com
post #137 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
First of all, I buy good suits because they look good on me, not simply because they are "beautiful." Second of all, most of these are not really Damascus steel, so in a sense they are playing "dress up" like many of the people on this board, and pretending to be something they are not. A cheap imitation, if you will.
I tend to equate "looking good" with beauty, as they seem fairly synonymous expressions, but my knowledge of the English language is fairly limited. You're right about the knives not being Damascus steel; in my post I didn't call it Damascus because I know that the Damascus method has been lost for centuries and literally none of them ever will be Damascus. There is no new Damascus and likely never will be. However, the Japanese (and other cultures) have used folded alloying techniques for centuries, and a derivation of that technique, called forge welding (or pattern welding) is how my Itou was made. That is what it is and it doesn't claim to be anything else, thus is not playing dress up. I used the term after you invoked it because it is commonly and ubiquitously used in this manner and I have no need to be peadantic to engage in the dialectic.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, as is function. As somebody with a lot of experience with knives, I can say that they are, if anything, less functional for me that most others I have tried.
Part of beauty, and part of function, is in the eye of the beholder, but not all. Regardless of that aspect, if a Japanese or whatever style of knife is less functional for you, that is perfectly valid. There are issues of birth and training involved. That makes it equally valid that some might like them better than the French or German styles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
While one of the daily horrors in the US may be a divorce of what is practical from what is beautiful, I don't necessarily agree with you, I am certain that one of the daily horrors on the internet is the divorce of what is real from what is artifice. Take that as you will.
You may understand that I take it in such a manner that I agree with you, which leads to...
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
As far as your first comment, my understanding of steeling knives has always been that it realigns the burrs on the edge. It seems to be a popular belief, although perhaps it is a misconception. Nonetheless, I will continue to do it as I was taught, as it seems to me to work.
The artifice was the claim that there are magnetic effects occurring during the steeling process that have some effect upon the result. We both know that it realigns the burrs, and you know that I was referring to that magnetic ideation as you are not unintelligent. I find it ironic that of all the little missteps and inaccuracies in this thread, that was the most far-fetched by an order of magnitude./quote] The problem is that I agree with you too much here -- there are a number of poseurs in cooking (and the number has really grown of late), just as there are poseurs in all of our hobbies, careers, and disciplines. I've been in houses that had high-end 'show' kitchens the owners would boil water in while the staff prepared meals in the real kitchen. Some people buy expensive knives to show them off or otherwise be snooty about them. But the fact that people do such things does not make quality Japanese knives less valid, less functional, or less beautiful by association with such people. However, that is precisely what you seem to be taking pains to imply from behind the shield of you experience. I find that a little disturbing and frankly, incorrect. Regards, Huntsman
post #138 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
You're right about the knives not being Damascus steel; in my post I didn't call it Damascus because I know that the Damascus method has been lost for centuries and literally none of them ever will be Damascus. There is no new Damascus and likely never will be.

SIDE NOTE: They've discovered how Damascus steel was made! The discovery was actually made in the 70s, but only in the last decade or so has it become more accepted among metalurgical scientists, if I recall correctly. Pure iron was heated in such a way and to such a high heat that up to half of it turned to carbide. This happened in chains, thus the "swirled/layered" look. Cool, huh?

Quote:
However, the Japanese (and other cultures) have used folded alloying techniques for centuries,

The Scandinavians did it, too. Viking swords!
post #139 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I've heard about them, I will call them up tomorrow. I'm actually in Sac. I've been reading things all over the map... do this... don't do this... frustrating, I'll just have to settle on a method and see what works best. I've been ordering my knives from www.sonomacutlery.com

You said you spoke to someone knowledgeable at MAC, right? I've trust their opinions over random people on the internet.
post #140 of 430
Just wanted to post a PSA. Chad Ward, the gentleman who previously wrote the knife guide on egullet.org has wrote an excellent book on selecting, using and maintaining kitchen knives. There is a full color section with some classic techniques Matt is so fond of as well. I bought the book and highly recommend it. Hopefully this is the correct Styleforum/Amazon referral link.
post #141 of 430
On a similar note, what do you all wear while cooking? I bought a chef's jacket but it is too big and will give it to my co-worker. The jacket may look pretentious but I think it is quite useful for covering up nicer clothes if you are cooking for a dinner party, etc.

The brand I got was Chef Revival and the fabric is pretty heavy though a little pricey at ~$40 for the basic model. I would assume the heavier the fabric the better. I see some jackets online for as low as $10. Does it matter all that much?
post #142 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
On a similar note, what do you all wear while cooking? I bought a chef's jacket but it is too big and will give it to my co-worker. The jacket may look pretentious but I think it is quite useful for covering up nicer clothes if you are cooking for a dinner party, etc.

The brand I got was Chef Revival and the fabric is pretty heavy though a little pricey at ~$40 for the basic model. I would assume the heavier the fabric the better. I see some jackets online for as low as $10. Does it matter all that much?

I don't guess for that price you're getting bespoke.

That said, I don't wear anything specific, unless we're grilling and then I wear my grilling apron that I received from A&M with my name embroidered on it.
post #143 of 430
I don't usually wear anything special, but I should. I used to have a chef's jacket, but it got so stained that I eventually tossed it. I've thought of getting another one for the very reason you state but I haven't gotten around to it.
post #144 of 430
WOW - I have learned many things here, I work for Victorinox who own RH Forschner - a very good commercial grade product, I want to thank the many posters who have provided very detailed and passionate facts ideas and concepts about the many different styles of knives, brands, as well as preferences - you guys are a treasure trove of information.

I like the summary of sharp good dull bad - I'm not here to say anything other than thanks - and hope all find what works for them.
post #145 of 430
I like the Globals, as much for the way they look as anything else -- both my wife and I are hacks with knives anyway. Puts me in mind of a term the butchers used to insult one another with at the meat-packing plant where I worked summers many years ago: "shoemaker"!
post #146 of 430
i love our henkels made in germany set.

i sharpen my knives all the time using the sharpening steel. not as fast ast bill the butcher though but im getting there.

i liked the henkels so much i gave a set to my mom
post #147 of 430
I've got:

Wustoff Classic Santoku
Wustoff Classic carving knife and fork
Forschner 10" Chefs
Forschner Bread knife
Forschner 6" Boning knife
Shun 4" Paring knife
Kyocera 6" Santoku

I love all of these knives, but I find that the Forschner have some of the best metal - they don't lose an edge that quickly, but they certainly are easier to sharpen. I can get all my knives to the same sharpness, but the German ones seem to be harder.

I make sure to use a bamboo or wooden cutting board as well, and I try not to cut anything resting on metal or ceramics because of the dulling of the knives.
post #148 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher View Post
I don't usually wear anything special, but I should. I used to have a chef's jacket, but it got so stained that I eventually tossed it. I've thought of getting another one for the very reason you state but I haven't gotten around to it.
I believe the Chef Revival one I have is a 7oz cotton/poly twill material. The cheaper ones are probably much lighter. Have you noticed any stains soaking through a lighter fabric? I got a MAC 4" santoku paring knife but I don't really like it, it is too wide for detailed work and kind of pointless to have a separate knife for chopping small things because I can do that with my larger santoku. I'm looking forward to trying out a 9" chef's knife because I'm not sure how I feel about my 6.5" santoku. It feels a bit too middle of the road for me.
post #149 of 430
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I believe the Chef Revival one I have is a 7oz cotton/poly twill material. The cheaper ones are probably much lighter. Have you noticed any stains soaking through a lighter fabric?


I don't know how thick mine was, but it wasy way heavier than 7 ounces. I never had any problems with things soaking through, even in restaurant kitchens.
post #150 of 430
Using Globals.
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