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The time to buy a new computer is NEVER - Page 2

post #16 of 119
Chris, I don't know if your photo output on the forum means that you're a photographer or work with photos professionally, but one of the digs on the new iMac is that it has 18 instead of 24 bit graphics in the 20" version. Slim can probably better describe the technicalities, but as I understand it, that means slightly less lifelike colors. Might be an issue if you're doing anything more than making youtube videos.
post #17 of 119
Well, these days, with an Intel chipset and very similar specs, hardware-wise is there really that much of a difference between a Mac and a PC?

Jon.
post #18 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiger02 View Post
Chris, I don't know if your photo output on the forum means that you're a photographer or work with photos professionally, but one of the digs on the new iMac is that it has 18 instead of 24 bit graphics in the 20" version. Slim can probably better describe the technicalities, but as I understand it, that means slightly less lifelike colors. Might be an issue if you're doing anything more than making youtube videos.

The difference in reality, is only about 16 million colors.
post #19 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by imageWIS View Post
Well, these days, with an Intel chipset and very similar specs, hardware-wise is there really that much of a difference between a Mac and a PC?

Jon.

The different here is greater than "They both use Intel, so they're practically the same".

With a Mac, you are limited in that hardware that Apple lets you select. You can select a couple different Intel CPU's and a couple different RAM, Video card, and Display configurations, but really only a couple of each. You might have a total of 40 different configurations within each product.

With a PC, you have millions of different configuration options. It's pretty much limitless. Additionally, once you have configured and purchased your system, you are more likely able to upgrade your system later down the road in many different ways.

Some may say thats the beauty of the Mac. It's simple, easy. However, you have virtually zero upgrade path and if you need a certain part of the computer beefed up for a special application, you could very easily be out of luck. A Mac is much more general purpose and set-and-forget. A PC is more customizable and can be used in essentially any application, and it's application can be changed quite easily.

I definitely recommend Mac's for some people, since there are cases where it makes a lot of sense, but I don't recommend them for everyone.
post #20 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by dapperdude View Post
There's also Linux. It runs on old hardware, and a lot of the newer distributions are pretty easy to install. Just stick in the install CD and choose the standard options. It's fine for web surfing, simple word processing stuff (using OpenOffice), etc. One area it typically falls short is multimedia. A lot of that stuff has to be installed separately, so watching videos and listening to music might not work out of the box.

While I do agree to some extent, I still think Linux is an OS for those with a special interest and lots of time to spend on their computers. In other words, not for those that wants something to work right out of the box; Mac would, in the latter case, be my first choice.
post #21 of 119
Get the latest iMac and upgrade every 3 years is my plan.

I use a new Dell laptop for work and I like it a lot despite the crappy XP O/S.

Quote:
With a Mac, you are limited in that hardware that Apple lets you select.

Well I agree but the hardware options are quite nice generally speaking and they are more robust. Limited options but better security and reliability in my experience. Also the iMacs are much better on photo and music work.
post #22 of 119
God I hate Vista. It has a pretty nice frontend for users, but it's so damn buggy.

I got a new HP laptop a few weeks ago, and am currently fighting a host of problems that I think are related to Divx. Mostly COM Surrogate crashing....
post #23 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
It's called Windows Movie Maker. It comes free with Windows. You are welcome.


Yeah, they also throw in WMP. Question is what type of media files it won't fail to choke on ?
BTW, I've never been a fan - to put it mildly - of the video editing progs that come either pre-intalled or on a separate disc with your PC.
post #24 of 119
Thread Starter 
I called up this pic on a 24" hi-def iMac screen and 1/3 of the shoppers dropped whatever they were doing and rushed to our corner to just stand and stare.
It looked ficken dazzling
As a side note, as far as peripherals go I shouldn't expect to have issues with connectivity 'cause Apple factors that in whenever stepping up to a new OS.
Specifically, the sales rep was referring to the upcoming Leopard system that I contemplate switching over to.

post #25 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christofuh View Post
I called up this pic on a 24" hi-def iMac screen and 1/3 of the shoppers dropped whatever they were doing and rushed to our corner to just stand and stare.
It looked ficken dazzling

Its a very nice pic, it looks great on my 24" Dell monitor at home too. I'm not sure exactly what that has to do with anything though. Plus, I don't like the super glossy wood.
post #26 of 119
Thread Starter 
Get a load of this gem




Vista's legal woes
(via Colin Miller. This post is best enjoyed while listening to either Iron Maiden's "The Number of The Beast", or R.E.M.'s "The End of The World As We Know It") .

Windows Vista is nearly upon us. Woe unto us, et cetera, et cetera. The Internet is abuzz with stories of people waiting for Vista with either nervous anticipation or disgruntled disgust. There are those who do not care, but their opinions rarely count, do they? Anyway, whether you're in the camp of those who will be queuing for a copy of the software, or you will be protesting with placards outside of your local PC World store, you will be aware of some of the issues debated.

The first concern with Vista is the re-vamped technological protection measures designed to seek and destroy objectionable materials in the computer, and which will even disable high-quality payback for unlicensed materials. The less publicised problem is that present in Microsoft's new EULA. I have finally managed to read it, and what a read it has proved to be!

There are two particular parts that I find troubling and highly problematic. The first relates to the removal of unwanted software:


"If turned on, Windows Defender will search your computer for "spyware," "adware" and other potentially unwanted software. If it finds potentially unwanted software, the software will ask you if you want to ignore, disable (quarantine) or remove it. Any potentially unwanted software rated "high" or "severe," will automatically be removed after scanning unless you change the default setting. Removing or disabling potentially unwanted software may result in
· other software on your computer ceasing to work, or
· your breaching a license to use other software on your computer.
By using this software, it is possible that you will also remove or disable software that is not potentially unwanted software."
This is problematic because it does not define spyware, and because apparently it allows Microsoft to define that which it considers to be at high and severe risk. While it does state what are the potential results of this system, it does not excuse it. It is the equivalent of me stating in a licence "this may result in the removal of your arm."

The second worrying section relates to hardware upgrade. This reads:

"You may uninstall the software and install it on another device for your use. You may not do so to share this license between devices.
(...)The first user of the software may reassign the license to another device one time, but only if the license terms of the software you upgraded from allows reassignment."

Some people have commented that this could very well mean that the possibilities for installing hardware upgrades would be seriously limited, particularly because another section in the licence states how many devices can "access the software installed on the licensed device to use File Services, Print Services, Internet Information Services and Internet Connection Sharing and Telephony Services". This allows 5 devices in Vista Home Basic, and 10 devices in Vista Home Premium and Vista Ultimate. The practicalities of this is that you will be able to make from five to ten changes in your computer, and after those changes, the licence will be deactivated. If you think that ten devices are a lot, this would in theory include USB drives, iPods, PnP wireless devices, routers, cameras, etc. If Microsoft follows the letter of the licence, the computer will easily become a dud.

Microsoft have stated that this is unlikely, and that the software will not act in the way the licence implies and it will allow minor hardware modifications. On the other hand, some fear that this is a slippery slope, and nothing stops Microsoft from changing their mind.

I tend to be less worried about the letter of the EULA than other people, mostly because in Europe the licence must be read in conjunction with consumer protection for non-individually drafted contracts. If a consumer is party to a form contract with a large retailer or service provider, the clauses contained must provide an adequate balance between the parties. If one clause is deemed abusive by skewing the balance, then the clause can be struck down from the agreement.

However, if you are outside of the European Economic Area, you're on your own. May we suggest Linux?
post #27 of 119
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I don't like the super glossy wood.


That's what she said
post #28 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by bachbeet View Post
Conne: So, if I need a new PC in the future, I'll know who to call.

Yessir.

I have been dying for a new PC, but I simply cannot drop $1K+ right now.

My Asus W3j laptop is pretty fucking sick, so I'm not too down about it...but oh man, the graphics capabilities available make me so horny.
post #29 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
My Asus W3j laptop is pretty fucking sick, so I'm not too down about it...but oh man, the graphics capabilities available make me so horny.

Dude, a lot of inanimate things seem to be making you horny lately.
post #30 of 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by visionology View Post
I'm on the edge of a new computer need (built mine 3 years ago with a couple upgrades since then) and have been thinking about the Vista vs. XP thing myself.

First I use Windows 2000 still so I've decided that if I can use it for this long with no issues, Windows XP will still be a viable O/S for a long while still, at least for the next 3 or 4 years. By then it will be time for another upgrade. I'm just starting to find now that some vendors aren't supporting Windows 2000 any more. Also Vista offers no real performance issues, has a lot of bugs, and is a resource hog, something I can live without.

I am also considering getting an Apple Laptop as well for testing purposes and as a second computer. Some may say just get an Apple and do a dual O/S but the laptop would be nice for presentations.

Buying anything first year usually isn't a smart thing, especially with electronics and cars.

Apple laptops can run Windows. I have it on mine to play the games that aren't on OS X and it works pretty well. Not as solid as OS X still.
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