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Black polish on brown shoes?

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 
From Esquire

Quote:
38. POLISH YOUR MID- AND DARK-BROWN SHOES WITH BLACK SHOE POLISH. This will create darker shades near the seams and gradually deepen the patina all over.
http://men.msn.com/articlees.aspx?cp...=808246&page=2

He's got a point - forgoing the brown polish is going to save you $4.99, and who doesn't like that? But does this really work? Has anyone tried black polish on brown shoes? Results?
post #2 of 43
it works. but you got to do it several times before it takes on a really noticeable change in color. shoe polish wax is mostly translucent so it won't impart color right away.

i do like a bit of darker and antiqued browns in my footwear, but i wouldnt do that to ALL my shoes. i do want to keep lot of my brown shoes pure to their original color , thus i still will purchase a tin of brown.

try not to impart too much color on the vamp and crease areas:

1) it will lighten and perhaps even flake (depending on how you applied) in those flexible areas.

2) you get more depth and visual dramatic coloring patina when darkening only the toe cap and the heels.
post #3 of 43
That article was much better overall than I had anticipated. And yes, I have found that black polish used over time on mid-brown shoes will have a nice effect.....sadly I can't help but believe that it's due to build up around seems and stitching, but it looks nice in either event.
post #4 of 43
Use Black and Cordovan shoe polish on brown shoes....the shoes develop their own personality, and they are now unique as there is no other absolutly identical shoe to it in the world.

Regards.
post #5 of 43
Seems like using it in the long-term would turn your shoes into a sludgy mess. I've used black for antiquing, but a little goes a long way.
post #6 of 43
I just used black shoe polish to darken an A-E Fairfax in merlot that was much lighter than its mate. The project turned out very well, and the shoes are now well matched and handsome. The color is now also darker and richer than A-E's usual merlot.
post #7 of 43
I think AEs make ideal subjects for these multicolored polish experiments, because while the leather is good quality and the company offers a number of different colors, they are invariably pretty flat an "crayola" colored. I have a whole arsenal of different creams (chestnut, dusky brown, cordovan, tan, navy, and a few others I can't recall) so that I can play around, and so that I don't end up with 4 pairs of identically colored Chilli shoes.
post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
I think AEs make ideal subjects for these multicolored polish experiments, because while the leather is good quality and the company offers a number of different colors, they are invariably pretty flat an "crayola" colored.

Well, real patina is earned, by wearing and polishing the shoes. I have Chili shoes that have some depth to them, after wearing and polishing them over 3 or 4 years.
post #9 of 43
I'm against - black polish never seems to look right on anything but black shoes. And I'm definitely not against using the wrong color... just black always ends up looking grainy on the surface to me, and sticks in the seams really well which doesn't look good IMO.
post #10 of 43
Black by itself doesn't do a very good job, but I do often mix black with brown to darken and antique shoes.
post #11 of 43
I only use black to darken some of my shoes' front part, because that area was darker when I bought them. Rest should age and the patina should go darker naturally, imho.
post #12 of 43
32. THE CLASSIEST COLOR FOR BLACK TIE IS BLACK. How to break it: If you're a maverick, you can try midnight blue or dark chocolate.

Interesting, hadnt thought of that.



46. YOU DON'T NEED TO BUTTON EVERY BUTTON. On a two-button suit, button only the top button. On a three-button suit, button only the middle one. On a one-button suit, well, you don't have much choice.

Interesting...hadnt thought of that


48. CHECK YOUR FLY BEFORE ANSWERING THE DOOR.

I prefer to check it every 5 minutes just to feel secure.
post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post
32. THE CLASSIEST COLOR FOR BLACK TIE IS BLACK. How to break it: If you're a maverick, you can try midnight blue or dark chocolate.

Interesting, hadnt thought of that.

I'm pretty sure there was an RLPL version in chocolate a few years back.
post #14 of 43
2. INVESTING IN QUALITY OFTEN MEANS INVESTING IN THE THINGS YOU CAN'T SEE. Like the movement inside a mechanical watch, the full hand-canvasing in a jacket, or the hand-stitched uppers of your shoes.


The best bespoke English shoemakers sew everything on the shoe by hand except for the uppers, which are sewn by machine.
post #15 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
I'm against - black polish never seems to look right on anything but black shoes. And I'm definitely not against using the wrong color... just black always ends up looking grainy on the surface to me, and sticks in the seams really well which doesn't look good IMO.

I used it on a pair of very dark brown shoes, and the result has been beautiful. I then used it on a pair of mid-brown shoes, and I see the speckled/grainy look to which you refer. It may be the color contrast, or it may be the leathers themselves...I don't know.
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