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post #3046 of 3290
Never.
post #3047 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

Never.

 

This!

post #3048 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

Never.

Quote:
Originally Posted by davesmith View Post

This!

Which is why I live under a bridge.

Poor but happy!
post #3049 of 3290
The tie arrived today @TweedyProf. It actually goes really well with a glen plaid summer suit I have. If it's warm enough this weekend I just may rock it.
post #3050 of 3290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

The tie arrived today @TweedyProf. It actually goes really well with a glen plaid summer suit I have. If it's warm enough this weekend I just may rock it.


That's great. Glad you like it. It's a great tie. Please post when you do.

 

Did a count of the ties I wear for S/S, and I actually have about 14, having let go of three shantungs recently. Some of you might say "small timer". I aim for a tidy collection of 20 max per season (with a few overlapping). 20 ties means one tie a month, assuming a once a cycle wear before rehearing. 

post #3051 of 3290
Why did you get rid of your Shantung's? Season's just right around the corner. BTW, I notice I never wear ties with equal frequency. I notice they get worn in clumps.
post #3052 of 3290
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Why did you get rid of your Shantung's? Season's just right around the corner. BTW, I notice I never wear ties with equal frequency. I notice they get worn in clumps.


I suspect your wardrobe is of more breadth and depth than mine, so to avoid monotony, I tend to think a bit more in the morning. I suppose I'm a "clumper" too though.

 

On Shantungs: it might be that I actually don't like them!  The Drake's I posted are quite nice and we'll see if I pick one up and like it, probably the navy with gold stripes.

 

The one Urban got from me I bought from Shaya. I find Shaya's ties to be of really great quality (rolled edges are great, fabrics nice, construction solid, knots beautifully--see my pic above). Recommended. In the end, it just wasn't the green I was looking for. Basically, traded to help fund this one from Cappelli:

 

post #3053 of 3290
Thread Starter 

Ok, let's switch the game for discussion and follow at @Caustic Man. Pick three go to ties at the moment, your "clump". Think of this as preparation for a future thread...If your set is larger, by all means, show more.

 

Here are my three, all blue

 

1. Cappelli indigo/blue silk herringbone (I suspect this fabric comes from Drapers).

 

 

2. Drake's navy, orange silk

 

 

And this beauty, made from Drapers linen, not yet in my hands (Cappelli)

 


Edited by TweedyProf - 4/27/16 at 6:28pm
post #3054 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post


I like that combo @jcmeyer
 . It's clean and solid. I think tasteful green ties are a bit of a rarity that they always come off as an accent. I'm still thinking of a knit. Just sold @UrbanComposition
 my last shantung which I'm sure he will wear better than I, but here it is, a bit more saturated and darker, I think, than the chive matka:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



One thing I've noted about Vanda silk ties is that given the lack of lining, the hand rolling impresses on the front blade. I think that's part of the charm of a Vanda, but it's noticeable. An interlining would abolish the effect. I don't have the same problem with the wool Vanda I own.

Hmmm...no other suggestions on possible spring buys, tie wise? Are we all saturated on the purchasing tie front?

Thanks, TP. I agree about a green tie feeling more like an accent somehow, and yes the Vanda hand-rolled edges do show on the silk, which I like - further you typically get some visible lines/imprint from the six-fold toward the bottom. Great knots with anything that has some catch, the very slick silk does tend to need consistent tightening and be harder to get right for me anyway.

I assume you'll do a 5/10 thread for S/S so you'd see these again then, but these are my current S/S-specific ties, the first five of which are currently available.

Vanda Grenadine Shantung w/dots



Vanda Navy Hopsack



Vanda Chive Matka (repeat pic from upthread)



Shibumi Shantung Repp



Shibumi Shantung w/dots



Vanda Shantung Repp



Brooks Brothers Cotton Madras



Exquisite Trimmings Shantung Repp



Jcrew Liberty of London cotton print - this one is not universally loved, and it's far too skinny, but i still like it.



Forget the maker at the moment - cotton/linen block stripes



Cable Car Clothiers Silk Knit
post #3055 of 3290

I love that Cappelli. It is right in the sweet spot of shades that I find appealing. Good choice on the PS too.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post
 

1. Cappelli indigo/blue silk herringbone (I suspect this fabric comes from Drapers).

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Please help @TheoProf to learn how to wear Madras ties. :)

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcmeyer View Post


Brooks Brothers Cotton Madras Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 
post #3056 of 3290
I have a question about congruence between fabric and cut. Are certain cuts only appropriate at certain points along the country/city continuum? For example, it seems that an Edward Sexton ultra-structured cut would look bizarre on a linen suit. But both a country tweed and city worsted may stand up to the whole range of cuts from sack to structured.
Edited by otterhound - 5/3/16 at 12:40pm
post #3057 of 3290
Strictly speaking, cut = style and should not reflect how casual something appears. Primarily the fabric does. British tailors do country tweed suits with sporty elements such as an action back, hacking/patch pockets, etc but the cut is more or less the same.

The eye may see the softer lines of an southern Italian jacket as more casual, and should be considered, but it's not the determining factor.
post #3058 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhound View Post

I have a question about congruence between fabric and cut. Are certain cuts only appropriate at certain points along the country/city continuum? For example, it seems that an Edward Sexton ultra-structured cut would look bizarre on a linen suit. But both a country tweed and city worsted may stand up to the whole range of cuts from sack to structured.

 

Is there a reason why you ask?  It’s a complicated question and I doubt there’ll be unanimity.  The categories you mention are pretty large.

 

Your point about linen is well-taken, but “country tweed,” on the other hand, is too big a category to generalize about so far as cut and other design features are concerned beyond, I think, some very basic traits having more to do with the cloth than what it’s made into.

 

Most of what such jackets had in common back when the English upper class started buying or renting estates in Scotland was that they were largely “sport coats” in the strict sense:  coats to be worn whilst engaged in outdoor sporting activities, which at the time meant shooting, “stalking” (mostly deer), fishing, and riding (including hunting).   However, the details of the jacket design would vary depending on the purposes for which the jacket would be put:  for shooting that means action backs and sometimes additional padding in the right armpit/chest area (for right-handed shooters), for example.  In general such sporting jackets were cut more generously than city clothing to allow greater freedom of movement; the important exception would be show or hunt coats for riders, since the influence of the military uniform was strong in these cases (ordinary jackets for purely recreational hacking might be more generously cut).   Quarters were typically pretty closed since the primary function was warmth in a cold climate (and hence the occasional throatlatch); once again riding jackets are an exception, typically being a bit shorter and having open quarters to accommodate the pommel and twist of the saddle (as I’m sure you already know the ancestor of the morning coat was a riding coat).  As outdoor jackets, most pockets were flapped to protect the contents from rain and, in the case of a riding coat, to prevent the contents from falling out.

 

Now fast-forward to the present and most of these design characteristics have become untethered from their original functional or traditional mooring and there’s nothing to prevent contemporary designers from mixing and matching in any way they see fit.  This is one of the main ways historical change in costume occurs, after all.  We’ve all seen modern worsted city suits with hacking pockets even though one would never mount a horse in one.  

 

In any event, each must decide for himself how much, if at all, custom and history matters to him.

 

 I personally prefer tweed jackets to have somewhat closed quarters unless they have other design elements and cut suggestive of equestrian DNA, and I don’t much like hacking pockets on business suits.  Everyone has the right to their personal preferences and thus YMMV.

 

Cheers,

 

Ac


Edited by Academic2 - 5/4/16 at 11:59am
post #3059 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Academic2 View Post

Is there a reason why you ask? 
I suppose I ask because when left to my own devices I tend to err in the direction of over-structured (my tailor has had to pull me back from the brink). I mentioned Edward Sexton because I could see myself going that far (his shirt collars excepted). Although I'm pretty sure this tendency wouldn't get me in trouble with a city worsted, I'm uncertain whether it would render weird results in, say a herringbone tweed suit.
post #3060 of 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhound View Post

I have a question about congruence between fabric and cut. Are certain cuts only appropriate at certain points along the country/city continuum? For example, it seems that an Edward Sexton ultra-structured cut would look bizarre on a linen suit. But both a country tweed and city worsted may stand up to the whole range of cuts from sack to structured.

I don't think there's a wrong answer here with respect to what cuts you get particular fabrics made in. A lot of people have one tailor and get everything made in the same style. My preference is to figure out what cut is generally most flattering for me and then let the fabrics convey how formal or casual my attire is, but there's nothing inherently wrong with using different cuts for different pieces, in particular having one tailor for more formal clothing and another for more casual clothing. I tend to find drape cuts and most of what they do in Naples a bit more casual and structured cuts like Huntsman a bit more formal, but it's not a huge difference. A navy worsted suit is still a navy worsted suit. If it fits and the cut is right for you, it will look good. Same with any odd jacket.
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