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Scent/Fragrance of the Day thread - Page 4

post #46 of 20753
Jicky is Sean Connery's favorite fragrance. It was considered unisex, straight off. It's true that fecal notes seem to be discerned in some well known fragrances, from established houses. Cabochard, from Gres is an example. Cuir de Russie, is one more.
post #47 of 20753
I really like the repulsive element in scents. Robert Piguet's Bandit is also very heavy and a distinctly leather scent. Caron's Tabac Bland is another unusual scent; Creed's Angelique Encens--made for Marlene Dietrich--is as well, a beguiling perfume.
post #48 of 20753
Yes, I wouldn't doubt it. Well, an 'off' note can help to make a fragrance smell chic. I've always thought that Chanel no. 5 smelled a little repulsive. Same with Chanel no. 19. Coco was big into 'effects' that fragrance could create. Her Gardenia fragrance, has no gardenia in it. The scent is constructed from like and opposing elements, that end up conjuring a Gardenia. I like that much more than a fragrance that's got a hundred pounds of gardenia petals, crushed into a bottle.

Caron Third Man is a head-spinning fragrance that can make me feel like reeling. It's difficult, at least to my nose. But very chic and high style. Another example: NU, from YSL. About the only truly androgynous fragrance, I can think of.

Regarding Bandit . . . that's one of the few scents that is marketed both to men and to women, in different packaging, I believe. The scent is exactly the same. Goutal Mandragore, is another one.
post #49 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling View Post
Jicky is Sean Connery's favorite fragrance. It was considered unisex, straight off. It's true that fecal notes seem to be discerned in some well known fragrances, from established houses. Cabochard, from Gres is an example. Cuir de Russie, is one more.

The new Cuir de Russie isn't as heady as the old one. I suspect it's due to the lack of materials and the fact that the current tastes aren't quite up to the decadence of the original.
post #50 of 20753
That could be. Many fragrances have been 'modernized' or thinned out, or reformulated during the past decades. L'Heure Bleue does not smell the way it did, when I was growing up. Neither does L'Air du Temps. Madame Rochas is barely recognizable. What a shame. I think Chanel Pour Monsieur has been altered, as well.
post #51 of 20753
I also have a somewhat obscure Japanese scent by Hiroko Koshino which I picked up at Nordstrom. It's rich incense and very heady with an element of offness to it, but still somehow sweet. I'd also like to try Montale’s Black Aoud and Caron's Yatagan. Comme des Garcons's Avignon is another great one. I'm not fond of those light-weight floral scents at all. They're anemic and usually smell like alcohol. No taste--sort of like those perfume sampler pages you would find in a Vogue. The scents I am listing would be incredibly chic worn by women. Women wearing men's musky fragrances has always struck me as very stylish.
post #52 of 20753
Thomas can tell you all about Yatagan. It is an extraordinary scent. I was very young when I tried it. Didn't agree with me.

I've known a number of women who gravitate toward men's fragrances. My hairdresser is from Germany. She has always worn men's preparations. Many men in Europe wore the woman's version of Opium, from the time it made its debut. Jean Cocteau wore Chanel no. 5. Takes a sophisticated nose, to discern whether or not a scent is 'male' or 'female,' from just a whiff. I doubt many people would know the difference.
post #53 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I also have a somewhat obscure Japanese scent by Hiroko Koshino which I picked up at Nordstrom. It's rich incense and very heady with an element of offness to it, but still somehow sweet.

I'd also like to try Montale’s Black Aoud...

I haven't tried the Koshino, but it sounds intriguing.

Montale's Aouds are all very nice, if you like agarwood of course. In fact, I like a lot of Montale, even the regular series (Greyland and Patchouli Leaves are really standouts). All of them are quite pleasant, but with an added element of kick in there that keeps them from feeling too stodgy. Greyland, for example, has citrus elements with woods, which wouldn't be anything to write home about except they also added cumin, which makes it really warm and spicey. Pathouli leaves, likewise, has the definite patchouli kick but is blended such that it is never too earthy or dirty (otherwise pure patchouli smells too much like an old hippy to me).

I also think LK would love L'artisan Parfumeur. I find their offerings off kilter, but in a very heady and decadent sort of way while never being gimmicky.

As for Creeds that don't get much press and are very unexpected (GIT and Millesime Imperial get all the press and are very standard "classy scents), try Ambre Canelle, Jasmin Imperatrice Eugenie, Baie de Genievre, and especially my personal favorite Aubepine Acacia. The latter acts like it wants to me a standard citrus/floral fare but then kicks out this weird metallic element... very unique! As well, Ambre Canelle has an almost smutty sort of sensuality in there.

The mainstream designer scents I miss the most (I still have bottles, but unfortunately they've been discontinued and are getting tougher to find) are the Helmut Lang trio of EdP, EdC, and Cuiron. They really were completely unconcerned with being popular and I really give HL credit for that. I wish Jil Sander had followed suit; the fragrances bearing her name these days are all typically boring "fresh" "sporty" garbage...

Prada, on the other hand, love them or hate them are doing a great job with fragrances. The new "Infusion d'iris" which just came out really reminds me of a lot of the classic unisex scents of the 30's. It's like a lighter, fresher Dior Homme (without the leather) or a richer, deeper Hermes Hiris.
post #54 of 20753
I also think LK would love L'artisan Parfumeur. I find their offerings off kilter, but in a very heady and decadent sort of way while never being gimmicky.
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Of the niche houses, L'artisan is the one I like best. This although some of their scents strike me rather as excuses, than as creations. Agree that a number of their offerings are different, but viable. I like Voleur de Roses. Fou D'Absinthe, strikes me as darkly mysterious. Some others, like D'zing, or Mechant Loup, I just can't seem to enjoy. I'm probably too old. Timbuktu is a wild spicy scent, for cold weather.
post #55 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling View Post
D'zing

one of my, and my girlfriend's, all time favorites. Always reminds me of the smell of shoe-polish
post #56 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling View Post
Timbuktu is a wild spicy scent, for cold weather.

Yes, Timbuktu is my personal favorite from the line. Voleur de Rose is a close second, even though sometimes I get as much (or more) patchouli than Rose...
post #57 of 20753
Of the L'Artisan series I have only Patchouli Patch which is a tame and well-balanced Patchouli scent. It's kind of almonds and Dr. Pepper... pleasant but I'm not reaching for it often. I nearly pulled the trigger on a bottle of Dzing! but for some reason held back.

As for Caron's Yatagan, it's a holy grail scent for me but I can understand how others might not like it. I don't find it dated, although it's nothing at all like anything coming out these days.
post #58 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas View Post
Of the L'Artisan series I have only Patchouli Patch which is a tame and well-balanced Patchouli scent. It's kind of almonds and Dr. Pepper... pleasant but I'm not reaching for it often. I nearly pulled the trigger on a bottle of Dzing! but for some reason held back.

As for Caron's Yatagan, it's a holy grail scent for me but I can understand how others might not like it. I don't find it dated, although it's nothing at all like anything coming out these days.

I like PP, but a lot of L'artisan fans do not. Nevertheless, that probably not the one I would want to be my "intro" scent to L'aP. For you, I think you'd love Timbuktu. It's definitely sweeter and smoother than L'autre or Yatagan, but much more sultry and just as "stinky." (in a good way)

You might also like Passage d'enfer, which is all spices and incense. It's sort of like Yatagan-goes-to-Church.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joel_Cairo View Post
one of my, and my girlfriend's, all time favorites. Always reminds me of the smell of shoe-polish

Phil, have you ever tried Parfum d'empire Cuir Ottoman? It's very different from Dzing, but has that sort of leather-and-something-oily combo (instead of shoe polish, it's sort of like motor oil or something equally greasy). I love it!
post #59 of 20753
Thomas and Label King might want to try Kublai Khan, from Serge & Lutens. Has to be experienced, to be believed.
post #60 of 20753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivan Kipling View Post
Thomas and Label King might want to try Kublai Khan, from Serge & Lutens. Has to be experienced, to be believed.

Very true. For a weaker alternative (and cheaper) that pales in comparison but nevertheless gives some musky goodness, they may want to give Kiehl's Musk a try.
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