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Scent/Fragrance of the Day thread - Page 1607

post #24091 of 25724
Still sampling the La Curie scents. Faunus, the oud scent, wasn't really my cup of tea in the end. I think the quality is good but it has a similar note as Dior Oud leather - a dusty sharp oud note rather than the more medical note. Anyway, that note rubs me the wrong way in the Dior and it does so too with Faunus.

Today I'm trying Larrea. Her site describes it thus: Ghosts of a desert monsoon. Dust encounters rain. chaparral, musk, petrichor, ozone, leather.

I generally hate that kind of description, but the interesting thing is this scent does smell like a desert rain storm. The ozone/aquatic note is present, but thankfully it's subtle. Otherwise it's has that desert sage/smoke/leather vibe that appears to be her trademark. I like that her scents are interesting but generally restrained and easy to wear. I also tried Ossuary a couple days ago, and my main impression is that there's too much overlap with Incendo. I'd be interested to see her depart from the chaparral/smoke/incense style, and it appears that Sub Rosa, listed as 'coming soon,' will try to do that. Not sure if I'll buy a larger bottle of any of these - she does sell 10 ml travel bottles, which I wish more brands would do. If I were to buy one it would probably be Incendo.
post #24092 of 25724
All that being said, I own CdR EdT but find the Parfum version really super too and worth smelling if you can.
post #24093 of 25724
I am weawring Tilda Swinton Like This by ELDO today.
post #24094 of 25724
Today I had trouble picking what to wear. SOTD was ByKilian Amber Oud. Started out rather Oudy, then dried down to a honeyed smokey amber. First 1-2 hours had big projection, then it stuck around but much softer. Wouldn't pay $500+ for this, but if it was $100-150 maybe. It's fairly good but not really all that excellent. Would be impressive if it were a designer scent, but within niche it's fairly middle to upper pack. 8/10. Not worth looking for, but if you're smelling Kilian Ouds already, sure, give it a sniff. I prefer Incense Oud.
post #24095 of 25724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Master-Classter View Post

All that being said, I own CdR EdT but find the Parfum version really super too and worth smelling if you can.

I will probably pick it up, too, if I can. (parfum extrait wink.gif )
Edited by DeSense - 4/20/16 at 8:04pm
post #24096 of 25724
The Cuir de Russie extrait is wonderful - perfect for this fragrance with its animalic components and overall richness that subtly radiates.
post #24097 of 25724
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor01 View Post
 


Great frag and koodos to you for sporting a rose scent!  Reading your post inspired me to wear Amouage Homage attar today :)

I think it goes beyond rose actually.

 

I've always felt social pressure to wear "harsh" scents. That is, a perfume has to become a masculine, or more androgynous, by integrating some element of harshness and power. For examples of physical harshness, lavender has a bright harshness (Caron PUH), citrus has an abrasive harshness especially today when it is so often associated with cleaning products (Eau de Guerlain), aquatic notes have a slightly sickening harshness (Green Irish Tweed). There is also psychological harshness: tobacco is harsh not by its warm aroma but by association with cancer now, and a "bad habit" back then (Tabac Blond), leather/birch tar with the military who maintained their boots with it, and therefore with war of the old fashioned, brutal kind (Cuir de Russie). 

 

But the most popular scents, the complex, beautiful ones that people admire and enjoy instinctively, like rose, tuberose, jasmine or incense, have power and complexity rather than harshness. A perfume with that profile - such as the honeyed rose of Lyric Man - is like a touch of colour on a somber business outfit, and today perfectly appropriate outside a professional setting.

 

In that spirit, SOTD is Memo's Lalibella. However, the top notes don't work well for me, reminding me of the fake prettiness of hair spray and brush powder at a women's hairdresser after a strong coconut start. I'm hoping the incense, rose, tobacco and jasmine emerge soon. 

post #24098 of 25724

I gave up on Lalibela. I just couldn't see how it would turn into anything enjoyable. Goodbye hair spray. 

 

Now giving Ilha do Mel a try, also by Memo. Much better. As the hyacinth slowly turns into iris and jasmine, it gains depth and a certain creaminess, and saves me walking outside to smell the real thing (hey, it's hot here right now...). In theory (i.e. based on the label) there's jasmine absolute in this... looking forward to the vetiver/musk drydown. Not as balanced and refined as Cabochard, but this is quite "beautiful".

post #24099 of 25724
@crdb

Not dissing your post in the slightest, I for one am re-discovering scents at this stage and enjoying myself in the process of widening the scope and variety.

When you say "association" and then give respective examples, I don't think you mean this in a generalisation, almost prejudice kind of way, do you?

I did not see anything harsh or brutal or war related in CdR, or thought of cancer when wearing CdG Black. Far from it.

Associations are a very personal, individual thing.

When I was a kid we had a nanny. She was a lovely older lady and smelled exactly like that, very flowery. Nonetheless, that's a scent I wouldn't want to exude myself, under any circumstances. Not because I fear for my manlihood, or social pressure, just because of the association (old lady smell) it would induce on me. wink.gif HTMS.
Then, I'm not a friend of flower scents. For me roses (the real ones) don't smell like heaven, or that pleasant, or interesting. So not feeling like smelling like a flower bouquet is simply my personal thing. Nothing more.

CdG Black smells a lot like bike tube rubber to me. It reminds me of my teens when I had to regularly fix my bike. Which I would often just take out, day or night, for a joy ride on empty country roads, through forests and fields. There you have my associations with it. Nothing harsh or sinister.
Edited by DeSense - 4/21/16 at 1:46am
post #24100 of 25724
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeSense View Post

@crdb

Not dissing your post in the slightest, I for one am re-discovering scents at this stage and enjoying myself in the process of widening the scope and variety.

When you say "association" and then give respective examples, I don't think you mean this in a generalisation, almost prejudice kind of way, do you?

I did not see anything harsh or brutal or war related in CdR, or thought of cancer when wearing CdG Black. Far from it.

Associations are a very personal, individual thing.

When I was a kid we had a nanny. She was a lovely older lady and smelled exactly like that, very flowery. Nonetheless, that's a scent I wouldn't want to exude myself, under any circumstances. Not because I fear for my manlihood, or social pressure, just because of the association (old lady smell) it would induce on me. wink.gif HTMS.

CdG Black smells a lot like bike tube rubber to me. It reminds me of my teens when I had to regularly fix my bike. Which I would often just take out, day or night, for a joy ride on empty country roads, through forests and fields. There you have my associations with it. Nothing harsh or sinister.

 

Well, my take on art (and many other things, culture, life, etc.) - and this is a very engineer-y answer - is that it is high-dimensional. That is, everything we do is a form of finding a local minimum in a space with loads of variables, and often there is no single true simple "100% of cases" answer.

 

This does not mean that there are no objective realities; it does mean there are many subjective interpretations of whatever is objectively there. And indeed we are constantly trying to do a bit of dimensional reduction as we interact with the world and other people, trying to find a local optimum faster by not having to compute everything from scratch; this is where what you might call prejudices or generalizations might come in or be helpful. So in a way my approach to learning is to expose myself to many points of view, preferably starting with more generally accepted ones, and derive a truth from a large number of sometimes contradictory data points, to find a better local minimum. 

 

As a simple example, I worked in India for a few months and was told by everybody at work (an Indian company with not a single foreigner in sight, except a couple Bengali and Pakistani) that I had a Britisher accent and couldn't I speak English normally. It suddenly dawned on me that "Indian English" was a language in itself, perfectly normal for whatever percent of 1.2 billion people speak it, and actually, the tiny number of people for whom the Queen's English is "proper" is becoming increasingly irrelevant. In some ways they had more of a right to claim that they spoke English since they are more numerous. I guess that's sort of true of American English globally, by headcount, but most foreign countries teach British English in schools. What then is "proper" English? Context-dependent. There's personal context - your nanny - and regional and cultural context - like masculine rose in the Middle East. And there's global context, such as how most of the world goes to business meetings wearing the same lounge suits.

 

All this to say, that my thoughts are just that - thoughts coming on the way of discovery, trying to explain or at least dimensionally reduce (simplify the model at the cost of some added error) whatever I've encountered on the way. Rose in my traditional French family would be a feminine scent. Rose with my friends in Dubai is a perfectly acceptable masculine. Oakmoss and tweed go wonderfully with the European autumn. They are hell in Singapore. 

 

There come associations. Within certain cultural backgrounds - rapidly becoming a minority, numerically, in the world, even if they still command respect as the Greeks did under the Romans - there are reasons for certain smells to be associated with certain things. Tabac Blond was not objectively offensive on a lady in 1919, but associatively so in the way the bob haircut was, (amusingly itself a very feminine, somewhat classic signal today) because both were accessories of the flappers, who themselves were offensive to the traditional idea of the woman at the time.

 

Similarly, there is a hilarious clip in the recent show Silicon Valley where one of the developers in the company that stars in the show torpedoes a VC deal by being seen to smoke; imagine having a tobacco "soliflore" or tobacco-centric perfume when meeting such a VC! But there are many of us who love a tobacco note and will happily buy up Sultan Pasha's work heralding it. 

 

Or what about the abrasive qualities of a very sharp, salty citrus as I find to be in Eau de Guerlain? Someone who has never been exposed to colognes, and for whom citrus fruits are not native, might more readily make that association than one of conservatism and professionalism as say an East Coast white collar professional might. 

 

And so my little paragraph was a passing thought on trying to understand why people expect me to wear certain categories of scent (although as David Rose's Quora answer pointed out, today you are expected to wear none in most settings). Not a prescriptive set of generalisations. Just an attempt at thinking out loud. And thinking out loud now, I can't help but think that unlike the global rules for business dress, there is no accepted standard of fragrances, and so everything IS at least regionally/culturally context dependent. 

 

I could say much more on the subject, particularly on the degree and quality of artistic appreciation that can be derived from better contextual understanding, but a very anonymous and typographically annoying blogger did so much better than me. I really, really recommend this article: http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2013/06/05/film-crit-hulk-smash-hulk-vs.-spoilers-and-the-4-levels-of-how-we-consume-a. It ties in and expands on what Roudnitska was saying about quality vs. pleasantness.

 

FWIW I'd say the real reason CdR would tick off some people would be the civet and musk!

post #24101 of 25724
That was long but I read it all. Cheers!
post #24102 of 25724

SOTD: My own perfume! Since I really like patchouli I figured I might as well blend it myself! Problem is longevity, application T+3.5 hours and its pretty much gone from what I can sense.

This was a solid perfume I made with jojoba oil and beewax, I'll try the oil tomorrow.

post #24103 of 25724
Sported a decant of Parfums d'Empire Ambre Russe today. I get heavy leather and smoked tea from this and with quite a kick at the outset. The drydown is mild incense and musk on my wrist. Two sprays lasted 13 hours.
post #24104 of 25724
I've gotten great longevity out of Ambre Russe. Definitely on my to buy list soon. I own a lot of ambers but I find this one unique. Sort of boozy and bubbly, then dries down to a watery honey with smoke. I own Tea for Two as well but that's much drier/tanin-y
post #24105 of 25724

Well, it's been a few hours, and I have a pretty good idea now what Ilha do Mel is. The enormous jasmine start gradually transforms into an almost pure orange blossom (musk, vetiver? only on the packaging), reminiscent of Eau des Sens by Diptyque but not quite as imposing. I cannot tell when the transition occurred, it was quite gradual. 

 

I think I'll keep this one for when I know I'm only out for a short period of time, so as to maximise the jasmine part. To me (and Duchaufour, according to Beaulieu), orange blossom is a deceptively aggressive, bloody fragrance that is unsuitable for professional interaction and barely suitable even with friends and family...

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