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Scent/Fragrance of the Day thread - Page 908

post #13606 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maquis View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

I'm totally right there with you regarding the preference for vintage versions and would love to try the vintage Kolnisch Juchten, but I couldn't imagine the vintage containing that much more birch tar than the recent stuff or being that much more leathery.

Yeah, you're probably right about the amount of birch tar in both versions being negligibly different. But honestly, I'm also a bit of a classical typography nerd, and the Farina version is so much more appealing, aesthetically. (Not that aesthetics influences my fragrance purchases, generally...)

You have a very good point and you might not even know it - the labeling printed directly on the current KJ bottles start coming off with the slightest dribble from their mediocre sprayer. Quite ghetto indeed.
post #13607 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homme View Post

Timbuktu today. I think i'm warming to the idea of incense based scents for the summer, can definitely see TImbuktu and SL Eau Froide working (at least for days < 25C). I had always considered incense to be a winter-only note, but in timbuktu it's rather light, almost transparent (as opposed to avignon, for example).

I think Timbuktu would be a wonderful summer scent. On that note, I can't help but always think about the traditional context in which incense fragrances have been worn: in very hot climates (India, Middle East, Northern Africa).
post #13608 of 19077
Amouage's peepwall[1].gif fragrances basically always feature frankincense as a big player. And there are quite a few that behave very well in hot climates (Ciel, Dia, Silver and so on).
post #13609 of 19077

SOTD: L'Artisan - Piment Brulant. Delicious top notes and dry down to something more earthy. Must get more of this.

post #13610 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by HORNS View Post

You have a very good point and you might not even know it - the labeling printed directly on the current KJ bottles start coming off with the slightest dribble from their mediocre sprayer. Quite ghetto indeed.

Something is weird with that, right? Why would a big brand like Jean Marie Farina—isn't Roger & Gallet a top-selling fragrance in France?—sell off KJ, and allow the new firm to radically change the branding and quality (at least of the container...)?

On the other hand, maybe it's not that weird and there's an easy explanation. (sometimes reality really *is* stranger than any convoluted reasoning could be... laugh.gif )

Ultimately, though, I like it and I'll deal with any aesthetic issues I think it may have!
post #13611 of 19077
Perhaps you have all already read this, but I just discovered this article about a revival of classic men's fragrances:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/fashion/a-revival-for-classic-mens-fragrances-skin-deep.html

I wonder how IFRA regulations will affect this supposed resurgence. (Any modern reformulation certainly won't have the level of oakmoss, for one example, that vintage bottles have...)

In any account, I hope that there really is a movement towards more classic scents...
post #13612 of 19077
I don't agree entirely with that article. I think a lot of newspaper space--and NYT especially--is always filled by trend stories. The paper wants to make its readers feel like they're up to date with trends, but the fact is that a lot of the trends in those trend pieces are blips on the radar. Dior's decision to rebrand Miss Dior Cherie as Miss Dior and to rebrand the older formulation as Miss Dior Classic (or whatever they're calling it) speaks somewhat against the article, I think. The classic Miss Dior is very old-school, which means it doesn't sell well, and so Dior is pushing it to its own little corner of the marketplace. (I doubt it will continue to be sold at major retailers, where precious shelf space is limited.)

If there's a trend in contemporary perfumery, it's a trend toward proliferation of scents and diversity of styles. There are over 1000 new releases each year, many of which are generic copies of what's already been done, but many of which are also quite daring and innovative. On the mass market level, I think Thierry Mugler has done a fantastic job of introducing really innovative scents to a broad base of consumers. And at the more niche level, you've got companies like TF and ELDO getting into the market with lineups of 12 or so fragrances all at one go. These houses have distinct house styles that are compelling within the history of perfumery. (I know there's disagreement in this thread about the value of some of these, especially of Tom Ford.) Lutens, Tauer, and CdG are three more examples of this.

I for one am happy that the classics are still available on the market, no doubt about that. But I'm also happy to see the art of perfumery looking forward and producing scents, like Feu d'Issey for example, that would have been practically unthinkable in earlier eras.

Of course this represents my aesthetic sensibilities generally. I was just at a philosophy conference where the speaker brought up in passing that Elliott Carter had recently died. He hastened to add that he would never actually listen to Carter; he much preferred Bach. I, for one, would much rather listen to Carter!
post #13613 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by L'Incandescent View Post

Honestly, I think the odds that they are exactly the same formula are quite low. Even the most famous and best selling fragrances in the world get reformulated fairly frequently, often in order to make a bigger profit. They don't advertise that they've done that. Even though lots of people buy new bottles when their old ones run out and would thus likely notice the difference, the practice continues. If that's true for mainstream fragrances, I'd be shocked if little-known scents like KJ maintained their original recipes throughout the centuries. Goodness, even Jicky doesn't have the same recipe.

This is the most reasonable view, IMHO. Frequently the original ingredients - or even bases, if the perfumer used them - aren't available any longer via restriction or cost or both. So you substitute with something else and hope for the best. I think Serge Lutens once said that sometimes reformulations can make a scent better, but only he could get away with saying that sort of thing, and he's the only one I can recall who has made this point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr_Incognito View Post

I am planning to buy a bottle of Guerlain Heritage and want to know how is the longevity and sillage of this fragrance? Is there a lot of difference between the current and vintage versions?
How does it compare with Rocabar?

Heritage is a big brassy scent that is not much like Rocabar in temperament.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maquis View Post

Perhaps you have all already read this, but I just discovered this article about a revival of classic men's fragrances:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/20/fashion/a-revival-for-classic-mens-fragrances-skin-deep.html
I wonder how IFRA regulations will affect this supposed resurgence. (Any modern reformulation certainly won't have the level of oakmoss, for one example, that vintage bottles have...)
In any account, I hope that there really is a movement towards more classic scents...

Not feeling it.
post #13614 of 19077
Pre-shower: Kerosene Whips and Roses. What a difference a couple of months makes. When I first smelled this, I wasn't feeling it at all. I think because the top was so very different from what I expected. (Oddly enough, I still smell the very top as an intense, sharp cut grass note. But there's nothing like that in the listed notes and no one else online mentions that. My nose must be reading that blood orange as grass. Weird.) It's a sharp, biting leather with lots of nuance, and I'm actually enjoying it now. The bottle is awesome too, although I don't own it. Actually, Maquis might be interested in giving this a try.

SOTD: Feminite du Bois--Shiseido. As crazy as this might sound, the Lutens version is actually less saturated than the original.

Also, a good piece of fragrance news for me. I bought a bottle of vintage L'Interdit in the summer, but I was pretty disappointed with it, as it smelled like the juice had turned. I pulled it out again this morning, and it smelled just like vintage L'Interdit should. Don't know what accounts for that, but I'll take it!
post #13615 of 19077
I wore Ambre Sultan yesterday, and for the very first time I actually understood what people mean when they say "Scent Progression" - not that I thought it was all a lie, or anything, but yesterday was the first time it really struck me. It started out like jurassic honeycomb, or something, sappy and warm and ambery and honeyed, and the later and later it got the more I thought it was almost mirroring the night: It went from sunny and glowing (not harsh) to sort of a smoother "evening" foresty feel, and then into a honey, "casked," almost scotch-y scent - which happily coincided with a couple of hours in a pub, sitting at barrel-tables - and then, even later, into a slinking, soft, sweeter, maybe sultrier honey-gold, full of dark corners and flickering firelight. I was washing up at 2 in the morning after a long day and an even longer night out, and it really came over me how it had been a constant presence for the entire night, sort of reassuring and warm, and even when I woke up this morning there was the barest bright buzz to it, like it was doing its best to help me kick off the night's excesses, reflecting the sunlight. It was sort of mind-blowing, actually.
post #13616 of 19077
man, I really need to start doing more drugs.
post #13617 of 19077
Glad you enjoyed Ambre Sultan. It really is a great fragrance!

Today, I'm wearing Memo - Granada. It's good! Floral (citrus, jasmine) and woodsy//vanilla base.
post #13618 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Glad you enjoyed Ambre Sultan. It really is a great fragrance!
Today, I'm wearing Memo - Granada. It's good! Floral (citrus, jasmine) and woodsy//vanilla base.

Interesting, the floral note that dominates Granada for me is the orange blossom. I'm keenly aware of that because I'm not normally a fan of that note, but I do like it here. Do you get more jasmine than orange blossom?

(Just checked fragrantica. Looks like their users report getting more jasmine than orange blossom. Hmm.)
post #13619 of 19077
Yep, the orange blossom is there, but I get a good dosage of jasmine too.
post #13620 of 19077
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1os View Post

Glad someone else appreciates Amouage; I always feel like a fanboi. wink.gif
What can you compare Interlude to? Interlude Man or Woman?

It was interlude man edp. First of all the amouage bottles are stunning. It's hard to compare amouage scents as they are quite complex (to me at least). It does compare to how bois 1920 oltremare smells on my skin after a couple of hours, but in a grow up smokier version kinda way...

I am honestly not an Amouage fanboy. I only loved (and owned) jubilation, which was a huge hit with the ladies wink.gif
Edited by olivier.nyc - 11/11/12 at 6:14pm
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