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"tweaking" shoe fit

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
In the past when I purchased shoes from mid-range retailers such as Bloomingdales or Nordstroms, the salespeople would always suggest those cheap padded insoles for shoes that "almost" fit but were a little big.  After a couple such experiences, I've concluded that insoles fail miserably at improving fit.  In retrospect, an insole probably detracts from the way a good shoe is designed. Another suggestion was an adhesive pad placed on the underside of the tongue.  This seems like it has more potential for improving fit without negatively effecting the design or balance of the shoe.  Can any of you shoe aficionados comment on that? I'm asking because after years of Cole Haans and Ballys, I recently purchased two pairs of nice shoes, some C&Js and Grensons.  Both are size 7.5D and I experience some heel slippage in both.  I tried the next half size down, but that was clearly too small.  Perhaps a 7EE or something might fit well, but no one stocks stuff like that and I got both pairs on clearance when sizes are not plentiful.  Both pairs are also monkstraps which might have some effect on the fit as they cannot be laced tighter.  In any case, any suggestions for eliminating or reducing the heel slippage would be most appreciated. dan
post #2 of 13
Basically, everything you can do is kind of kludgey. Tongue pads work OK, as they push your foot back in the shoe. If those don't work you can also get adhesive heel snugs that fill some of the empty space in the heel counter. I think that whether you need to push your foot forward or backward depends on how well the shoe fits across the instep of the foot. If the shoe is a little loose in the instep, tongue pads will help. If the shoe fits fine in the instep, tongue pads won't help. In shoes that fit in the front of the foot but have some heel slippage, I often just do nothing and deal with it, unless the slippage is extreme (causes blisters or instability when walking). But I also use tongue pads on some shoes. I don't like heel snugs because my shoe trees rip them off.
post #3 of 13
I have had success with the adhesive heel inserts that any cobbler can afix in a minute or two.
post #4 of 13
Dan, Apparently we have almost identical feet. I've installed tongue pads in nearly every pair of shoes I own. You probably have a low instep which should be partially rectified by the inserts. Alternatively, the cheap gel heel inserts sold at drugstores artificially change the position of your arch and may help with the fit problems. I prefer the heel pads from Kmart (of all places). At the very worst, its a 1 blister/$6 experiment.
post #5 of 13
I've had great success with the tongue pads - I've got them in quite a few of my shoes. I don't really like the heal anti-slippage stick-ons as they seem to make my socks ride down. I recently discovered at a cobbler's shop some great leather arch supports. I had them installed in about half my shoes. Soooo much more comfortable after having them installed. Finally, another or additional route for shoes that are too big, I have used the expensive ($25 or so) but very nice leather insoles that are made by Allen-Edmonds and can be purchased from their website. They are great and very comfortable.
post #6 of 13
Am I missing something, but why buy shoes that are an "almost" fit to begin with? I always insist that any shoe I buy be a close approximation to absolute perfection or I simply don't buy it. For the same reason, I never buy shoes by mail order. The one pair of MTM boots I bought were also a profound disappointment. I have found that even shoes on the same last fit my feet differently. Unless I feel I could walk out of the store and keep going for five or six miles without raising a blister, I pass on the shoes. Having said all that, I did use tounge pads on a pair of cheap Clarks plain toe, rubber-soled bluchers and they seemed to work okay.
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Am I missing something, but why buy shoes that are an "almost" fit to begin with? I always insist that any shoe I buy be a close approximation to absolute perfection or I simply don't buy it. For the same reason, I never buy shoes by mail order. The one pair of MTM boots I bought were also a profound disappointment. I have found that even shoes on the same last fit my feet differently. Unless I feel I could walk out of the store and keep going for five or six miles without raising a blister, I pass on the shoes. Having said all that, I did use tounge pads on a pair of cheap Clarks plain toe, rubber-soled bluchers and they seemed to work okay.
That would be my preference as well, but until I can afford to spend full retail at an establishment that can provide me with the appropriate size, I'll make do with an "almost" fit.  I should add that this forum has refined my criteria for an "almost" fit almost as much as my discrimination with shoes in general.  The shoes I mentioned are far more comfortable and fit as well as any other pair in my closet now, heel slippage and all.  The things I used to put up with... That said, thanks for all the suggestions. Regards, dan
post #8 of 13
Dan, I fail to see how fit is a function of cost. For instance, I bought a pair of Clarks' "Ranger" model on sale at sporting goods store about a year ago for $60. Elegant? No, but I could probably walk 20 miles easily in them without any foot problems. I might mention that I am far from flush, and nearly all the "good" shoes I have purchased have been on sale or come from an outlet store at even lower price.
post #9 of 13
i'm bringing up this thread again because i'm having a problem with my tennis shoes.  i've been playing tennis in basketball shoes until recently i decided to try some proper tennis shoes.  i don't like high tops anymore. so for many years i've worn size 8.5 but i felt that my shoes were too snug and that my feet may be growing either longer or wider, i wasn't sure. to make a long story short, i now know i'm a 9D. the problem is that my shoes fit my left foot perfectly, but my heel is slipping in the right shoe. the rest of shoe fits well though. i've tried the lace trick for heel slippage, but while this works for casual wear, it doesn't keep my heel from slipping during play. i've tried on many different shoes and have the same problem with all of them. any tips???
post #10 of 13
did you try wearing an 8.5 on your right foot?
post #11 of 13
yes. but the length is too short for both feet. 9 is my 'real' size. i just have this problem with the heel of my right foot.
post #12 of 13
Have you tried different thickness in socks? I have everything from thin Goldtoe nylon socks to very thick (made in) Ireland wool "walking" socks.
post #13 of 13
i played today with some extra thick nike socks and they do help, but they effect the way the rest of the shoe fits.
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