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Sears roebuck 1920s catalog scans...

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Showed these to Banks in another thread, thought a few others might appreciate 'em. From a book called "Everyday Fashions of the Twenties". Click for larger - much, much larger.
post #2 of 21
Are those square-toed shoes I spy?
post #3 of 21
My thoughts exactly, straight out of the late 90's
post #4 of 21
CASSIMERE ..
post #5 of 21
l told ya everyone; square-toes were popular in the 1920's. Are you listening T4phage...
post #6 of 21
Webster's 1913 Dictionary: Cas"si*mere (?), n. [Cf. F. casimir, prob. of the same origin as E. cashmere. Cf. Kerseymere.] A thin, twilled, woolen cloth, used for men's garments. [Written also kerseymere.] Jon.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
l told ya everyone; square-toes were popular in the 1920's. Are you listening T4phage...
You wouldn't happen to have a link to the post whence you mentioned it. Jon.
post #8 of 21
I will definetely eat my words, I was one of the guys that refused to believe square toe shoes existed back then. I will say, however, it IS a Sears catalogue. Not sure if its really the apex of style. Could be that really badly dressed men of the 20s wore the same ugly shoes that really badly dressed men of the 90s wore.
post #9 of 21
The square-end knit ties are surprising. I guess I never imagined they were from such an early time. It's also interesting how they offer both wiiiiiide and such narrow ties side by side. I have the distinct impression that modern ties are of higher quality silks and construction. They do offer reversible ties, though. Why do many of the shoes seem to have an indentation on the toe?
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Webster's 1913 Dictionary: Cas"si*mere (?), n. [Cf. F. casimir, prob. of the same origin as E. cashmere. Cf. Kerseymere.] A thin, twilled, woolen cloth, used for men's garments. [Written also kerseymere.] Jon.
I see.
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
You wouldn't happen to have a link to the post whence you mentioned it.
http://www.styleforum.net/cgi-bin....9;st=10
Quote:
The square-end knit ties are surprising. I guess I never imagined they were from such an early time.
Are the 'open-end four-in-hand' ties the earliest incarnation of the seven-fold tie, I wonder? Ninety-five cents...
Quote:
Why do many of the shoes seem to have an indentation on the toe?
Perhaps it's supposed to be a depiction of the shine? Looks like a ding to me, too...
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Quote:
You wouldn't happen to have a link to the post whence you mentioned it.
http://www.styleforum.net/cgi-bin....9;st=10 on the toe?
[/quote] All I wanted, thanks. Jon.
post #13 of 21
I'm just shocked that Sears used to sell this kind of stuff...an actual calfskin shoe.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
I'm just shocked that Sears used to sell this kind of stuff...an actual calfskin shoe.
Goodyear Welted, nonetheless. Jon.
post #15 of 21
between 1908 and 1940, sears also sold kit houses. Here's a neat little essay about Mr. Sears and his company. did you know he got his start selling watches? i didn't. and here's mr. sears:
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