or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Handmade shirts
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Handmade shirts - Page 2

post #16 of 37
Thread Starter 
There is no doubt Made in Italy, England, etc. sounds better than Made in China but I believe in packaging, marketing and educating the consumer. The Carl Meyers collection will be available at Ben Silver, Romualdo, Paul Stuart (private Label), and a few other select stores. This collection is made in the USA.
post #17 of 37
I recall reading an article about Richard Tyler several years ago when he was designing the (last gasp of the) Anne Klein women's line. He used Asian seamstresses in Los Angeles to do the work. And while he marveled at their technical skill, he said they needed a lot of instruction to soften up the tailoring to produce the effect he was seeking. This dovetails with what I have heard for years about Hong Kong tailors: they can copy nearly anything you ask, but you need to be very clear about what you want. I would imagine you could make some very fine shirts in China if you had the right idea and resources behind you. As for being superior to Barba and Borrelli, I would doubt that since at that level questions of technical proficiency aren't really an issue. And many buyers of these shirts are also interested in furthering and preserving the artisanal tradition--this may be more important than delivering shirts at a certain price point.
post #18 of 37
Quote:
As for what I'd be inclined to buy, it depends on whether it is a good product or not.  If the product is good, it does not matter so much whether it is Italian or Chinese, but more on the price I'd be willing to pay.  I would not pay $250 for a Kiton shirt.  I wouldn't really mind paying $43 for a Jantzen shirt.  On the other hand, I would consider paying $250 for a Brioni/Burini shirt.  Ultimately though, I would want to pay more and buy custom clothing. Whether production is in Italy or China the actual production costs are almost invariably significantly lower than MSRP.  For Italy the fabric and buttons are mostly domestic, so no import duties on these.  Labor costs are quite a bit lower in these countries than in the USA.
I don't understand the wililngness to pay 250 for a Burini shirt but not a Kiton. koji
post #19 of 37
Why can't we all just buy Borrelli and be happy? Jon.
post #20 of 37
Very interesting to hear that a Chinese product could beat some super-high end Italian labels in quality. Keep us posted, this should shut up some of those China bashers. Is this going to be custom only or RTW too? Btw, I heard the English shoe industry also employ a lot of third-world immigrants.
post #21 of 37
Quote:
I don't understand the wililngness to pay 250 for a Burini shirt but not a Kiton.
Well, first of all I don't like what I consider excessive hand-stitching on Kiton shirts.  Second, I think that Brioni shirts are exceptionally beautiful and excellently constructed.  I feel that I'm getting much better "bang for the buck" with Brioni shirts.
post #22 of 37
I wasn't terribly pleased with the Burini shirt I got; amusing that even the Brioni salesman commented, "Don't get me wrong..it's a good shirt, but there's better..." (the most honest salesman I've ever met) koji
post #23 of 37
Banks, I'm inclined to agree on the over-the-top hand stitching on Kiton shirts.  I mean, who really needs to have hand stitching on the bottom hem of a shirt???  It's not as though that does anything for the shirt other than the owner's ego.  I love the shirts, mind you, but all the hand stitching is a bit much.  I'd rather pay a little for less hand-stitching.  I guess one can though, in Borrelli or Oxxford or, for even less hand stitching, Barba.
post #24 of 37
I was told once (by a Japanese gentleman that really knows his stuff) that you can buy suits in Japan that will put Kiton to shame, for cheap, because they are made in Shanghai.
post #25 of 37
Quote:
Very interesting to hear that a Chinese product could beat some super-high end Italian labels in quality. Keep us posted, this should shut up some of those China bashers.
This should surprise no-one. Gieves and Hawkes (I think, I could be mistaking them for another Savile Row House) have been offering a "Shanghai Bespoke" suit of not disimilar quality and at a considerably lower price compared to their "Made in England" suits. There is a large base of skilled artisans in China, and as another poster pointed out, there is no technology, no know how, that can't be transported anywhere adequate infrastructure exists. There is nothing magical about "Made in Italy" except for some very clever marketing in the 60s. And remember when "Made in Japan" was a bad thing. Not anymore. Japanese manufacture and materials (denim, for example) fetch a nice premium. Given the right marketing (and I sincerely believe that nobody, nobody is immune,) who is to say that we won't all be proudly declaring our custom suits to be "Made in China" in ten years time?
post #26 of 37
LA Guy, I believe that it is Kilgour who offer those "Shanghai bespoke" suits. I fully expect some Chinese firms to be able to offer high quality works, although I'm indeed surprised to hear that the quality is superior to Borrelli and Barba. I've never been to China but in Southeast Asia the vast majority of the better tailors are Chinese.
post #27 of 37
Quote:
I was told once (by a Japanese gentleman that really knows his stuff) that you can buy suits in Japan that will put Kiton to shame, for cheap, because they are made in Shanghai.
I'm sorry, but I'm old fashioned; if I ever get the money for a bespoke suit, I will not go to Tokyo (dishonouring my heritage here), I will make the pilgrammage to Naples. I've played on excellent Kawais and Yahamas, but they still pale in comparison to the finest Faziolis, Steinways, Bechsteins and Boesendorfers. Just my stupid opinion. koji
post #28 of 37
But notice how Shanghai conjures up a lost world of elegance, all art-deco mirrors and red laquer--and maybe there are traditions of craft and style that have hung on somehow for the last 60-70 years. I'll bet the Beijing bespoke would be a much harder sell.
post #29 of 37
Quote:
Does country of orgin matter?
Yes, it does. As others have said, while it's certainly the case that Chinese seamstresses and seamsters are capable of making superlative shirts, most Americans will associate Chinese-made clothing with cheaply-produced crap. You're going to have to do a whole lot of evangelism to overcome this perception, and even then, you'll probably find that it's harder to sell than something made in Italy.
Quote:
I am currently designing a custom shirt line to be made in China. These shirts will deliver within three weeks and are nearly handmade. The quality is superior to Borelli, Barbera, Etc...These shirts will retail between $100 and $250. This is nearly half the price of the above mentioned shirts.
I'd be interested to see the rundown of the features that make these shirts superior to Borrelli, and I'd be very interested to see the finished product.
post #30 of 37
I recently saw hand made clothing out of Viet-nam. The workmanship was so amazing. The cost was disgustingly cheap. The Carl Myers clothing is made in a factory called Traguardo on Fifth Ave around 26th Street. They will make you an excellent hand made suit for around $1500. Very classic British/Italian look. So don't go there looking for a Neoplitian or A & S type garment.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Handmade shirts