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which one is the eyesore? - Page 4

post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
Those are just random images I found on the net. I don`t know exactly where they are located.

The houses and the terrible neighborhoods pictured, are what you would find in a typical suburb of Tokyo, or even some residential parts of Tokyo.

Unfortunately,unlike the cool metropolis that you see in the heart of Tokyo, this is what the typical residential area looks like.

Those are typical modern houses anywhere in Japan. They are prefab and go up in a few weeks.

With the exception of a few distinct areas, Tokyo is an extremely ugly city. Modern Japanese aesthetic sensibilities tend to be appallingly tawdry.
post #47 of 54
Quote:
Most of them would be considered a poor people country cottage in Europe and not a well built at that.

Having spent lots of time in Europe, I have to object. Many American homes are far more luxurious than Euro counterparts, except among the rich. Build quality varies but many homes in the U.S. are extremely well built.
post #48 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactme_11 View Post
Thats actually a pretty unique house but the garage door looks completely out of place.
Looks like one of the better McMansions from Queens, NY. Snout townhouses: http://bp2.blogger.com/_kulnm8Gjhh8/...h/P1000946.JPG More at http://queenscrap.blogspot.com/2007/...contrasts.html http://bp2.blogger.com/_kulnm8Gjhh8/...600-h/crap.JPG Update http://curbed.com/archives/2006/10/2...mcmansion_.php http://www.outerb.com/?p=343 # 6-Bedroom House in Little Neck, $2,450,000 # Map - 252-19 Thornhill Ave, Little Neck, NY # Open House - 10/28/2006, 1-4 pm
post #49 of 54
In Tokyo, one of my relatives lives in a small house with a "two car" unattached "carport". Essentially, it is a 6 foot wide x 9 foot deep x 10 foot high two walled shed w/ ceiling. You drive on car in, push a button, and a hydraulic jack system raises the car up into the air, then you drive the second car in underneath it. So essentially, you have two cars stacked on top of each other. Sort of like this, but more permanent looking. This is in his front "yard". Essentially large enough to hold this structure, a walkway, about three cubic meters of gravel, and a hedge. Their doors are also only 6 foot tall. Somewhat of an inconvenience, since I happen to be 6'2". (In the middle of the night, trying to find the toilet) WHACK! F#%^*@$#!!!!
post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
I hate closely-packed suburbs. When I buy in a couple years I'm not even gonna look at anything with less than half an acre. I was browsing realtor.com and I think people that build 3000+ sq.ft. homes on .17 acre lots are completely retarded. Who wants to have an alley between their home and the next?

I also agree that houses with garages that take-up 3/4 of the front of the house look really ugly.

The Japanese. Perhaps they dont like it so much but I could probably stretch my dick to the neighbor's window sill while still keeping my body 90% inside the house.

Also I agree that a garage prominent house is a terrible thing. What ever happened to big beautiful glass panorama views from the living room? I think the only case that a garage being so obvious is ok are these two houses in Denen Chofu (specifically right by Numabe station, Ill try to take pics some day). There is a tiny garage/car port with a little garden to the side and a stairway up to the two story house just above the port. I dont know what it is about the design (especially since the house is SMALL) but I just like it. Maybe because dispite the garage/port there still appears to be a full house built above it (including lots of open glass)
post #51 of 54
Quote:
Essentially, it is a 6 foot wide x 9 foot deep x 10 foot high two walled shed w/ ceiling. You drive on car in, push a button, and a hydraulic jack system raises the car up into the air, then you drive the second car in underneath it. So essentially, you have two cars stacked on top of each other. Sort of like this, but more permanent looking.

These are called "lifts" and somewhat common among car guys in the South. My garage was designed with 14 foot ceilings so I could have the option of a lift being installed later. They work well but can be over $4K installed.

Just a pair of bespoke shoes!

My neighborhood has a neat solution to the garage issue. The entries are done on the side and the front uses nice windows like the rest of the house so you can't tell it's a garage. Looks beautiful. Some houses nearby have basement level garages where you drive around and down to the back for parking. That's even better as it keeps the driveways a bit cleaner.
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
Those (at least the top one) look more like bad city planning than bad houses.

As a planner, I'd argue that the first building is is bad architecture and urban design rather than land use planning. While teh 2nd one is not a skillfully done modern one, it is at least relatively true to the aesthetic.

From what I understand of Japan and recent events, "disposable" houses in many areas are seen as "normal" due to weather and geology. Better, safer and easier to replace a building that is designed to collapse than consume resources to build one that won't stand no matter what you do.
post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by doink View Post
From what I understand of Japan and recent events, "disposable" houses in many areas are seen as "normal" due to weather and geology. Better, safer and easier to replace a building that is designed to collapse than consume resources to build one that won't stand no matter what you do.

This is just an extension of the traditional Japanese building method. Being in a country prone to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tidal waves, and etc. Japanese structures were commonly built out of easily replaceable materials, wood, rice paper, woven floor mats, etc.
post #54 of 54
My house has no garage at all, which is not atypical of homes in the "core" Burlington area.

The "snout house" phenomemon is a combination of car culture and land-use efficiency, architectural niceties be damned.
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