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check out these Ltd edition Berluti's wholecuts - Page 2

post #16 of 24
I have mixed feelings about these. I like to look at them, but would not wear.
As oppose to some shoes that have no right to exists these Berluties make an interesting design statement.
I would make brogues based on this design. I would use etched script instead of punched wholes. It would've been a model that I might want to wear some day.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
I actually like the looks of this type of thing. The leather has an attractive finish, and the object has a lot of visual interest. But I'd like it a lot more if the design appeared more deliberate. The random writing, and the way it runs off the edges, looks like Silly Putty has been put to a comic book. Maybe an old map design or an interesting pattern of circles and loops would be more to my taste.

Congrats on post 4k and I'm going to agree with you. It isn't something I'd use everyday but I think it is an attractive case. The shoes on the other hand...
post #18 of 24
I'm not sure how it was done, but I would imagine that the etching or engraving process takes place on the leather before the shoes are made. Thus, there's no risk of ruining the shoes due to an error in etching -- that part of the leather just wouldn't be used. I also imagine that the etching is done via machine -- a laser likely does it. I find the idea of shoes with writing on them interesting but the execution sadly pretentious. What does the document from Louis XV's court concern? The price of wheat? Why choose a document from a ruler whose most memorable features are his dalliance with Madame de Pompadour and his alleged statement, "Apres moi, le deluge!" Why not the Sun King, Louis XIV? It would be more interesting if the text in question could be something that meant something to the wearer, rather than cribbed together out of bits and pieces of some document. It is another triumph of effect over substance: shoes with random writing on them which look cool because they have writing, but this writing has no relevance or meaning to the wearer or the shoe, and there are a thousand other people out there wearing shoes with the same writing on them.
post #19 of 24
I like the scalpel leather. I think it's creative. Looks even better in person.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
I'm not sure how it was done, but I would imagine that the etching or engraving process takes place on the leather before the shoes are made. Thus, there's no risk of ruining the shoes due to an error in etching -- that part of the leather just wouldn't be used. I also imagine that the etching is done via machine -- a laser likely does it.

Isn't the leather stretched over the last as the shoe is made? Wouldn't that distort the writing?
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
I'm not sure how it was done, but I would imagine that the etching or engraving process takes place on the leather before the shoes are made. Thus, there's no risk of ruining the shoes due to an error in etching -- that part of the leather just wouldn't be used. I also imagine that the etching is done via machine -- a laser likely does it. I find the idea of shoes with writing on them interesting but the execution sadly pretentious. What does the document from Louis XV's court concern? The price of wheat? Why choose a document from a ruler whose most memorable features are his dalliance with Madame de Pompadour and his alleged statement, "Apres moi, le deluge!" Why not the Sun King, Louis XIV? It would be more interesting if the text in question could be something that meant something to the wearer, rather than cribbed together out of bits and pieces of some document. It is another triumph of effect over substance: shoes with random writing on them which look cool because they have writing, but this writing has no relevance or meaning to the wearer or the shoe, and there are a thousand other people out there wearing shoes with the same writing on them.

QFT

It may cost six grand or something, but those shoes and that case are no less irritating than some shitty messenger bag with a bunch of random text on it from Atrium.
post #22 of 24
Olga Berluti has always being involved in baroque creations....
She worked on the beautiful movie "Farinelli"....The wardrobe creations were sublime....One to watch...

She is baroque and very creative....Berluti is one of these brands that i will compared to George Bush...You hate or love Berluti and after trying them for years ,most of us do frankly want to get rid of them...
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by diorshoe View Post
yes that shoe would be very hot , but from afar it looks like it got really scratched up or something or you didnt really finish polish job and left some streaks on.

the right shoe from afar looks like your foot got caught on the underside of an old metal work desk and you yanked out your foot causing some scrapes from the old shrapnel hanging from the underside

Brillaint description of an every day work situation that destroys good shoes and happens all the time....
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
I'm not sure how it was done, but I would imagine that the etching or engraving process takes place on the leather before the shoes are made. Thus, there's no risk of ruining the shoes due to an error in etching -- that part of the leather just wouldn't be used. I also imagine that the etching is done via machine -- a laser likely does it. I find the idea of shoes with writing on them interesting but the execution sadly pretentious. What does the document from Louis XV's court concern? The price of wheat? Why choose a document from a ruler whose most memorable features are his dalliance with Madame de Pompadour and his alleged statement, "Apres moi, le deluge!" Why not the Sun King, Louis XIV? It would be more interesting if the text in question could be something that meant something to the wearer, rather than cribbed together out of bits and pieces of some document. It is another triumph of effect over substance: shoes with random writing on them which look cool because they have writing, but this writing has no relevance or meaning to the wearer or the shoe, and there are a thousand other people out there wearing shoes with the same writing on them.


4000 posts and still telling it like it us... Onya RJMan
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