Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Gun Appreciation Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gun Appreciation Thread - Page 244

post #3646 of 3812

Oh yeah, the triggers are definitely an issue. I had to replace the springs in my 438 to get it anywhere near my old police Mod. 10. I don't know if it's a purposeful thing or not. I suppose years of use could have softened the old triggers up, though.

post #3647 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post
 

Turns out I have to take the full class to get my carry permit renewed, which expires in two weeks.  Compound that with the fact that I'm interviewing for jobs in two states that don't recognize a MN permit (also a couple of shitty states for gun laws in general), and I'm in a dilly of a pickle.


My small advice is to not live your life by CCW laws (which it doesn't seem like you are doing). Go where you can find good work at a good wage and if it happens to be an anti-2A place, register to vote there and add your voice in support of your civil rights.

post #3648 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 


My small advice is to not live your life by CCW laws (which it doesn't seem like you are doing). Go where you can find good work at a good wage and if it happens to be an anti-2A place, register to vote there and add your voice in support of your civil rights.

 

I will.  It just seems dumb to pay $200/person to take a class and pay the state to renew my license when it probably won't do me any good.  On the other hand, none of these job opportunities are a sure thing yet.

 

Edit: I have never actually carried in the five years either.  I just like having the permit in case I do want to start carrying, it eliminates the need for a purchase permit, and when I'm transporting guns to and from the range, I don't have to worry about anything.

post #3649 of 3812

If it were me I'd probably renew it anyway. Even if you move to a state that doesn't recognize it, you are still recognized in many other states which you may end up visiting often for work. I keep my KY license even though it is no good in IL because no one recognizes an IL license, so when I travel I can still carry. In any case, if you've got the license then carry, man! It's there to protect you.

post #3650 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post


Edit: I have never actually carried in the five years either. 


never too late to start.
post #3651 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

I suppose years of use could have softened the old triggers up, though.

this is what i wondered as well, i thnk it definitely plays a role.
post #3652 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

I suppose years of use could have softened the old triggers up, though.

this is what i wondered as well, i thnk it definitely plays a role.
post #3653 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

If it were me I'd probably renew it anyway. Even if you move to a state that doesn't recognize it, you are still recognized in many other states which you may end up visiting often for work. I keep my KY license even though it is no good in IL because no one recognizes an IL license, so when I travel I can still carry. In any case, if you've got the license then carry, man! It's there to protect you.

 

Well, if I move to IL, I'll have to ping you on how to safely move my guns to IL because from what I have read it is illegal to possess guns as a IL resident without a FOID, which you can't get until you're a resident.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekS View Post


never too late to start.


I hear you.

post #3654 of 3812

Yeah, hit me up if you move here. There are some nuances and oddities (contradictions) to the gun laws in IL.

post #3655 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekS View Post

this is my BIGGEST issue. I can deal with the lock, but a hammer mounted pin on a revolver is important to me. I also dont like the way the triggers feel on the new ones, even the performance centers. I mean id take one, but given the choice between an old 686 or a new 686, id go old every single time without hesitation.

Well, Smith & Wesson .22 revolvers have had frame-mounted firing pins for many, many years. Do you have a beef with them? On the other hand, I have heard it claimed that the locks can malfunction and tie up the gun unexpectedly. Aesthetically, they are abominable, too, I think, making the gun look like a wind-up toy. I also distrust the MIM parts in the newer guns. I love and cherish my vintage Smith revolvers dearly, but I am uninterested in the newer guns. Perhaps, though, I am doing them an injustice, my experience with them being negligible.
post #3656 of 3812

Personally I have never had an issue with MIM parts. They might indeed be weaker than forged parts, but I imagine that in the real world this difference in negligible. Given the choice, however, I would opt for forged parts so I get what you are saying. As for the lock, I agree, it looks like garbage an I would be mortified if it ever locked up my 438 (the only S&W I have with a lock) and I'd probably never use it for carry again. All in all, I'd say the new stuff S&W makes varies quite a lot. My M&P 9 has run like clockwork, accurate too. I'd be interested in the Thunder Ranch revolver, it looks nice. 

post #3657 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Well, Smith & Wesson .22 revolvers have had frame-mounted firing pins for many, many years. Do you have a beef with them? On the other hand, I have heard it claimed that the locks can malfunction and tie up the gun unexpectedly. Aesthetically, they are abominable, too, I think, making the gun look like a wind-up toy. I also distrust the MIM parts in the newer guns. I love and cherish my vintage Smith revolvers dearly, but I am uninterested in the newer guns. Perhaps, though, I am doing them an injustice, my experience with them being negligible.

As for the old 22 smiths, ive never owned one. I suppose it bothers me less on a rimfire cartridge compared to a centerfire. I wouldnt say i have a beef with frame mounted firing pins... the pythons have one as well.... I just prefer a hammer mounted firing pin. I tend to take maybe too much advice from my gunsmith...hes been smithing for 40 years. Most of my opinions come from advice ive gotten from him.
post #3658 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Well, Smith & Wesson .22 revolvers have had frame-mounted firing pins for many, many years. Do you have a beef with them? On the other hand, I have heard it claimed that the locks can malfunction and tie up the gun unexpectedly. Aesthetically, they are abominable, too, I think, making the gun look like a wind-up toy. I also distrust the MIM parts in the newer guns. I love and cherish my vintage Smith revolvers dearly, but I am uninterested in the newer guns. Perhaps, though, I am doing them an injustice, my experience with them being negligible.

As for the old 22 smiths, ive never owned one. I suppose it bothers me less on a rimfire cartridge compared to a centerfire. I wouldnt say i have a beef with frame mounted firing pins... the pythons have one as well.... I just prefer a hammer mounted firing pin. I tend to take maybe too much advice from my gunsmith...hes been smithing for 40 years. Most of my opinions come from advice ive gotten from him.
post #3659 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerekS View Post

As for the old 22 smiths, ive never owned one. I suppose it bothers me less on a rimfire cartridge compared to a centerfire. I wouldnt say i have a beef with frame mounted firing pins... the pythons have one as well.... I just prefer a hammer mounted firing pin. I tend to take maybe too much advice from my gunsmith...hes been smithing for 40 years. Most of my opinions come from advice ive gotten from him.

There are two major advantages to hammer-mounted firing pins: You can see at a glance that the firing pin is intact. Also, you can check and see if the firing pin is about to break by pinching it and giving it a twist. Like yourself, I prefer a visible, i.e., hammer-mounted, firing pin. The foremost advantage to frame-mounted firing pins is that they are supposed to be less subject to primer extrusions pushing back into the firing pin hole and typing up the gun. That said, about the only time I can recall this happening was with my Ruger Super Blackhawk .44 Magnum and some very hot Norma factory loads. This would have been almost a half-century ago. The Super-B, of course, has a frame-mounted firing pin.

Factory loads for magnum cartridges are a good deal tamer than they were back in the '60s, and max loads in the manuals are generally more cautious. Since I shun pedal-to-the-metal handloads, this really isn't an issue for me.

If you are going to do a lot of dry snapping without snap caps (a very poor practice in my opinion), the frame-mounted firing pins are more prone to breakage, I found. On the other hand, frame-mounted firing pins are prone to peening out the firing pin hole, which will eventually need attention. I learned these lessons many years ago when I was young and new to handgun ownership.

A lot of good revolvers do have frame-mounted firing pins, including every revolver Ruger has ever made. Every revolver that uses a transfer-bar safety system, which includes most modern revolvers, must of necessity have a frame-mounted firing pin.
post #3660 of 3812
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


If you are going to do a lot of dry snapping without snap caps (a very poor practice in my opinion), the frame-mounted firing pins are more prone to breakage, I found.

 

Have you ever actually broken a firing pin due to dry firing? I used to do a lot of single action competitive shooting and I always dry fired with snap caps, but I was always curious as to how harmful it actually is. I've never heard of anyone breaking a pin because of it.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Gun Appreciation Thread