or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Gun Appreciation Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gun Appreciation Thread - Page 173

post #2581 of 3148
I've always wanted to do that how do you get started?
post #2582 of 3148
It's really easy. If you are familiar with a shotgun you can go out to the range or club and rent a gun buy some ammo, ear, and eyes. It's really that simple. If you aren't familiar with shotguns I would recommend a safety lesson followed by an actual shooting lesson. It will prevent possible bad habits and is well worth it, even experienced shooters experience positive results by taking lessons. From there I would start with trap and skeet , then move to wobble , sporting clays , and finally 5 station.
It's an incredibly fun sport. The general culture at PGC trap and skeet is fantastic. I met a random dude ,shooting wobble today. I stayed for an extra two rounds. If you rent the sport isn't that expensive. If you find you really like it and its something you will peruse then buying a gun the fits you properly can be expensive but it will pay off in the end. Guns range from 1,000.00 to 2,300.00 for an entry level gun but a real sweet gun that I will probably never see in my lifetime can go for 10k plus.
post #2583 of 3148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post

 

 Guns range from 1,000.00 to 2,300.00 for an entry level gun but a real sweet gun that I will probably never see in my lifetime can go for 10k plus.

 

 

1000

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

1000

1000

 

 

 

1000

 

1000

 

 

 

1000

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

1000

 

1000

 

1000

 

 

 

If you really get into it at a serious level, you will need multiple guns.  Skeet gun for skeet.  Sporting for sporting clays and 5 stand.  Trap gun for trap.  Field gun for upland hunting.

 

It is also hard to switch back and forth between guns and games.  Different points of impact, ect.  Not saying that a very gifted and well rounded shooter can't do it all well , but I focus primarily on skeet.

 

next on my list

 

 

Kreighoff K-80 Pro Skeet Standard Grade (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

post #2584 of 3148
Nice Bakes, very nice.

A Merkel 28 gauge SxS is my grail gun. One of these days...
post #2585 of 3148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crane's View Post

Nice Bakes, very nice.

A Merkel 28 gauge SxS is my grail gun. One of these days...

Sidelock, I presume if it's a "grail gun." Their boxlocks seem relatively affordable.

There is something quite charming about the 28 gauge, but I always thought the price of ammo would be the killer although I suppose I could spring for a shotshell reloading outfit if I wanted a 28-gauge badly enough. As it is, I have a hard enough time hitting flying objects with a 12!
post #2586 of 3148
Yep Jan, it'll be a sidelock. Ammo is more expensive but the 28 is a hunting gun for me. I have a Rem 870 Wingmaster that's killed a whole lot of squirrels, rabbits and quail. For everything else I use a good old 12 gauge.
post #2587 of 3148
I am just not there .I am trying to shoot at least 3 days a week, now. I wish I could go everyday. My shooting instructor said for the time beginning I should stick with wobble. If I bang out 23's to 25's, on the regular, I will switch to sporting clays or 5 stand. 5 stand just looks to hard for me at this point.
@bakes what is your opinion a the Beretta silver pigeon for a starter gun?
post #2588 of 3148
Mauro I shot trap with an old 870 Wingmaster 12 way way back. So far back I shot as a junior. Great practice for duck and pheasant hunting. I even managed to shoot a 100 a couple of times and did OK shooting doubles too. Ahhh the good old days.
post #2589 of 3148
I am gearing up for deer season. In the DC you may only use a shotgun further northwest and south you may use a rifle. I think I will miss turkey season but think I can hunt dove now. Pheasant and grouse would be fun until then I will stick with wobble and sporting clays.
post #2590 of 3148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post

I am just not there .I am trying to shoot at least 3 days a week, now. I wish I could go everyday. My shooting instructor said for the time beginning I should stick with wobble. If I bang out 23's to 25's, on the regular, I will switch to sporting clays or 5 stand. 5 stand just looks to hard for me at this point.
@bakes what is your opinion a the Beretta silver pigeon for a starter gun?

 

Silver Pigeon is a good starter gun.  It was my first.  It was a field gun, so light and short.  I think the reasoning was that since I was a kid I should have something smaller and lighter.  I insisted that it be a 12ga because I thought 20s were for women.  Needless to say, it beat the crap out of me.  I still have it and hunt with it.

1000

 

If you are looking at silver pigeons, I'm fairly certain that the only difference b/w the I and the II & III is nicer wood, extended chokes and different engraving.  Functionally, they are identical.  Also, used guns are always a good idea because you can trade them back in for pretty close to what you paid if you decide you want to upgrade or get something else.

 

1000I

 

I don't necessarily think that wobble trap is easier than sporting clays, 5 stand, or skeet.  Trap is a lot more monotonous, but still very challenging in its own right.  Having a trap gun that fits you well is a big advantage.  If you get 23s-25s in any of those games consistently, then you are a very good shooter.  Besides, its all about having fun.  If you break more than half of the targets you have done pretty good.

post #2591 of 3148
Hot damn, I am off to a good start. Thank you for the info.
post #2592 of 3148

It probably helps (Like you said) that you have someone correcting all of the counter-productive habits that new shooters usually develop.  Typically, shooters get to a certain level and start expecting higher scores from themselves, and then they "try too hard" and psych themselves out.  Then they get frustrated that they aren't performing as well as they expect themselves to and it perpetuates the problem.  A lot of people loose interest at this phase, because its just not fun anymore since they get so pissed off.  (Like me and golf)

 

Once you master the fundamentals, it becomes a game of focus more than anything else.  Some days you are in the zone, other days you can't get in the zone.  I perform best when I try not to think about what I'm doing, as counter intuitive as that may sound.  If I'm too deliberate it just works against me.

 

Also, shooters fall in to one of two categories, (really its a spectrum/continuum and people are usually closer to one end than the other)  At one end, you have shooters that just have excellent coordination and can break targets just based on that.  (This kind has an advantage at sporting clays/5 stand since every course is different and courses often change week by week).  The other end of the spectrum are routine shooters.  They are very methodical, set up exactly the same every time, start the gun in the same exact spot, break the target in the same exact spot, ect. like a machine. If they set up slightly different, it throws them off and they miss.  If there is an unexpected gust of wind or a slow pull, same thing.  These types of shooters, which is the end of the spectrum that I am closer to, often excel in skeet because every shot is predictable and once you get your timing and muscle memory programmed, you can theoretically break targets with your eyes closed.

 

There is really no right way of doing things.  There is drastic contrast in style among the best shooters at my club .  Some are very methodical and have textbook form.  Others are very unorthodox and almost crouch as if they are a lineman setting up before the snap.  It is almost as if they do everything wrong, but it works for them and they are just as good as those with a more conventional approach, if not better.  Another instructor might tell you that everything your instructor taught you is wrong.  It all depends on what works best for you.  Anytime you make changes in your style/approach, expect your scores to go down initially before going back up as you adjust to the change.  Like one step back 2 steps forward.

 

For trap, the best advice that I can give you is keep your cheek pressed firmly on the top of the stock and don't even lift your eyes to see the target.  Keep your head down and your eyes looking strait down the barrel.

 

Thats about all that I have for you.

post #2593 of 3148
@Bakes, I appreciate the insight. The range was packed today. There was a tourney and the weather was perfect. I shoot 3 rounds of wobble. I scored an 17, 20, and 18.The way I was told to shoot and makes sense to me is the clay is a pretty girl. You want to look at the pretty girl not at your gun, I could understand that. I noticed today I lifted my head a few times. I have a long way to go so more lessons and range time are in my future. I feel pretty strongly about the sport so I won't be giving up that's for sure.
post #2594 of 3148
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mauro View Post

@Bakes, I appreciate the insight. The range was packed today. There was a tourney and the weather was perfect. I shoot 3 rounds of wobble. I scored an 17, 20, and 18.The way I was told to shoot and makes sense to me is the clay is a pretty girl. You want to look at the pretty girl not at your gun, I could understand that. I noticed today I lifted my head a few times. I have a long way to go so more lessons and range time are in my future. I feel pretty strongly about the sport so I won't be giving up that's for sure.

 

Yes, look at the target, not the barrel.  But look down the barrel at the target.  (In other words, don't move your eyes to follow the target without moving the gun along with them.)

post #2595 of 3148
I am for sure on the right track. I am also taking a bunch of tactical classes so I wonder how if will effect my clay game. I like tactical training but if I had to pick a sport it would be clays.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Chat
Styleforum › Forums › General › General Chat › Gun Appreciation Thread