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Gun Appreciation Thread - Page 152

post #2266 of 3155

My comment wasn't specific to Remington, rather a good practice to avoid rust.  Heard it from duck hunters that hunt over salt water.

 

Never heard that 870s are prone to rust until you mentioned it.

post #2267 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

My comment wasn't specific to Remington, rather a good practice to avoid rust.  Heard it from duck hunters that hunt over salt water.

 

Never heard that 870s are prone to rust until you mentioned it.

 

The parkerizing on 870s makes them pretty resistant to permanent damage, but, if left in humid environments for extended periods, they can develop surface rust. Now, I'm not talking about half a century in a swamp when I say extended periods in humidity either; I mean a year under a bed in a southern home. Still, if it happens, with the rough finish they have, you just hit them with a little bit of steel wool, and they're back to new. It's a durable finish, but it can look ugly if left unattended. You could also prevent that by keeping a bit of oil on the surface while storing it or storing it in a dehumidified environment (a safe).

post #2268 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheSizzle View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

My comment wasn't specific to Remington, rather a good practice to avoid rust.  Heard it from duck hunters that hunt over salt water.

Never heard that 870s are prone to rust until you mentioned it.

The parkerizing on 870s makes them pretty resistant to permanent damage, but, if left in humid environments for extended periods, they can develop surface rust. Now, I'm not talking about half a century in a swamp when I say extended periods in humidity either; I mean a year under a bed in a southern home. Still, if it happens, with the rough finish they have, you just hit them with a little bit of steel wool, and they're back to new. It's a durable finish, but it can look ugly if left unattended. You could also prevent that by keeping a bit of oil on the surface while storing it or storing it in a dehumidified environment (a safe).

The 870 Express is a blued finish rather than parkerized, and I have heard tons of complaints about rust on the Express. If I get an Express, I'm going to have it refinished in something more corrosion resistant.
post #2269 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by retronotmetro View Post

The 870 Express is a blued finish rather than parkerized, and I have heard tons of complaints about rust on the Express. If I get an Express, I'm going to have it refinished in something more corrosion resistant.

 

Well, my comment was based on parkerized models.

 

If you want a tough finish, you could look into Cerakote. They have certified coaters in most of the country, and the results usually come out quite well.

post #2270 of 3155
I find most gun oils to be too light when it comes to keeping the rust away. I use a good synthetic gun grease on mine and have no rust issues at all. I hunt with wood and blued guns in rain, snow and otherwise damp conditions all the time. Once I get home I dry them off, wipe them down with a greasy rag and let them sit in an area with air circulation for a day or two and then put them in the safe. Oh and don't store your gun in the case you drag around in the field. I've seen far too many guns get covered in rust because the inside of the case was damp.
post #2271 of 3155
What is all this talk about Remington 870s being prone to rust? I have a blued finish 870 that I bought back in 1966. I haven't used it much in recent years, but my stepson shoots it quite a bit. It's never had a spot of rust on it. I've used nothing more than WD-40 as a rust preventative for many years with very good success.

Now, if I hunted waterfowl in salt marshes or spent a lot of time with a gun in swamps, I would be more assiduous about rust prevention.
post #2272 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

What is all this talk about Remington 870s being prone to rust? I have a blued finish 870 that I bought back in 1966. I haven't used it much in recent years, but my stepson shoots it quite a bit. It's never had a spot of rust on it. I've used nothing more than WD-40 as a rust preventative for many years with very good success.

Now, if I hunted waterfowl in salt marshes or spent a lot of time with a gun in swamps, I would be more assiduous about rust prevention.

 

It's uncommon, and it shouldn't occur with proper care, which is ridiculously minimal. However, in high-humidity, low-lubrication, sustained exposure situations, minimal surface rust can present itself. Clearly, any kind of oil will prevent that, but some people are overly anxious about the possibility and want to just not care about such a shotgun. Thus, they throw on a durable finish like Cerakote. 

 

As far as I'm concerned, though, you buy an 870 because it's the Glock of shotguns. Even if you stored it at the bottom of a salt pond for the next decade, it would probably fire, even if it weren't pretty.

post #2273 of 3155
I'm looking to go to the range and try out a Walther Pk380 and Sig Sauer P238. Ideally I think I'd like a SAO, and I'm not married to the .380 in fact, if something similarly priced and sized was available in a 9MM that might be preferable, as it seems deals on 9MM seem much more frequent. Anyone have recommendations?
post #2274 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I'm looking to go to the range and try out a Walther Pk380 and Sig Sauer P238. Ideally I think I'd like a SAO, and I'm not married to the .380 in fact, if something similarly priced and sized was available in a 9MM that might be preferable, as it seems deals on 9MM seem much more frequent. Anyone have recommendations?

I own a 238 and have shot and sold a few Pk's. There is no comparison between these two guns feature or price wise. The PK is also significantly larger than a 238. It's a good gun that woks all the time. In 9mm you have the Sig 938 which is basically the 238 on steroids. The Ruger LC9 is a decent gun and a lot cheaper as well. Kahr makes a great little gun called the PM9 in 9mm or the P380 in 380. Stay far away from anything made by Diamondback. I own one of their 9s and it's a wretched piece of junk that keeps breaking. I should have went with my first choice which would have been the Kahr PM9 with night sights for my pocket nine.
post #2275 of 3155
^I mauled that decision for a few months before deciding on a Kahr P380. I'm pretty happy with it. I purchased it because I wanted something that I could clip onto a pair of athletic shorts (south FL heat) if I needed to, and not have it weighing them down. It was intended to be a pocket gun, but I find it easier to carry IWB (unless pocket carry is a necessity - dress slacks with shirt tucked in). If I lived farther north it would have been a PM9. If you can afford the extra weight and size I'd go 9mm to save money on ammunition.

Make sure you try the trigger pull on the LC9 before considering it. Kahr also recommends that their firearms be chambered by using the slide release button and not by racking the slide. Some have experienced it, others have not, but this quirk seems to be more of a necessity with their firearms over other brands and is something to consider if you're dead set against carrying hot.

I'm going to look into the 870 when the time comes. Thanks for the input on the rust issue.
post #2276 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

^I mauled that decision for a few months before deciding on a Kahr P380. I'm pretty happy with it. I purchased it because I wanted something that I could clip onto a pair of athletic shorts (south FL heat) if I needed to, and not have it weighing them down. It was intended to be a pocket gun, but I find it easier to carry IWB (unless pocket carry is a necessity - dress slacks with shirt tucked in). If I lived farther north it would have been a PM9. If you can afford the extra weight and size I'd go 9mm to save money on ammunition.

Make sure you try the trigger pull on the LC9 before considering it. Kahr also recommends that their firearms be chambered by using the slide release button and not by racking the slide. Some have experienced it, others have not, but this quirk seems to be more of a necessity with their firearms over other brands and is something to consider if you're dead set against carrying hot.

I'm going to look into the 870 when the time comes. Thanks for the input on the rust issue.

I have my carry permit, but I have never carried. The reason I was looking at SAO is that I think I feel more comfortable carrying one in the chamber on with a SAO gun, because to be honest, I don't think having to chamber a round in a confrontation is very plausible.
post #2277 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

I have my carry permit, but I have never carried. The reason I was looking at SAO is that I think I feel more comfortable carrying one in the chamber on with a SAO gun, because to be honest, I don't think having to chamber a round in a confrontation is very plausible.

I agree, but I prefer the DA trigger as my safety over having to flip off a manual safety on a SA design. Having said that, the Sig is built tough and you can tell as soon as you pick it up.
post #2278 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

I agree, but I prefer the DA trigger as my safety over having to flip off a manual safety on a SA design. Having said that, the Sig is built tough and you can tell as soon as you pick it up.

I definitely agree with your logic. Most of the time I carry something that's DA since it removes one more step that could be a stumbling block in a high stress situation. Keep it simple. Of course I say that with a grain of salt because if you've practiced your draw and shooting techniques like you're supposed to flipping the safety off becomes automatic without any thought.


Sig Sauer P238 by DYSong Photography, on Flickr
post #2279 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by suited View Post

^I mauled that decision for a few months before deciding on a Kahr P380. I'm pretty happy with it. I purchased it because I wanted something that I could clip onto a pair of athletic shorts (south FL heat) if I needed to, and not have it weighing them down. It was intended to be a pocket gun, but I find it easier to carry IWB (unless pocket carry is a necessity - dress slacks with shirt tucked in). If I lived farther north it would have been a PM9. If you can afford the extra weight and size I'd go 9mm to save money on ammunition.

Make sure you try the trigger pull on the LC9 before considering it. Kahr also recommends that their firearms be chambered by using the slide release button and not by racking the slide. Some have experienced it, others have not, but this quirk seems to be more of a necessity with their firearms over other brands and is something to consider if you're dead set against carrying hot.

I'm going to look into the 870 when the time comes. Thanks for the input on the rust issue.

 

Do you know why they suggest this? 

post #2280 of 3155
Quote:
Originally Posted by PhiPsi32 View Post

Do you know why they suggest this? 

Not sure, something to do with the design. If you watch Hickok45's video on youtube of the P380 and PM9 you'll see it explained a little better.
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