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Gun Appreciation Thread - Page 140

post #2086 of 3072
In case anyone was wondering, or wants to hear about it, I took my Ruger sr9c out again last friday and put somewhere around 100-150 rounds through it. Had to FTEs in the first magazine load within the first 10 rounds through it, but after that the rest of them were all smooth, with no issues to speak of at all. Made me a lot more reassured to use it as my future CCW, and even got to do some solid aim work on it. Very happy with it now that it is working as I originally expected it to.
post #2087 of 3072
I usually run 400-500 rounds through before I consider the handgun broken in. Also I would make some effort to diagnose the FTEs as well.
post #2088 of 3072
I don't know what caused them the first time... Really haven't a clue. Could have been the aluminum casings on the rounds? I don't know. And actually I had one FTE and one FTF, but that round fired normally later. I don't plan on carrying it in public any time in the near future considering I'm still a college student, but I plan on running many, many more rounds through it before I even take the class for my CCW permit. Just want to get used to firing it.
post #2089 of 3072

^^^ That's a good plan.

post #2090 of 3072

I didn't realize we had a Gun Appreciation Thread on SF.

 

Mossberg Maverick Model 88

 

 

Kimber Ultra Carry II

 

 

Beretta 90-Two

post #2091 of 3072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krish the Fish View Post

In case anyone was wondering, or wants to hear about it, I took my Ruger sr9c out again last friday and put somewhere around 100-150 rounds through it. Had to FTEs in the first magazine load within the first 10 rounds through it, but after that the rest of them were all smooth, with no issues to speak of at all. Made me a lot more reassured to use it as my future CCW, and even got to do some solid aim work on it. Very happy with it now that it is working as I originally expected it to.

I like my mark 3. I had to go out and buy a hard rubber mallet with a small head to get the barrel off, but since I took it all apart and gave it a big cleaning, I have put 750 rounds through it without a problem.
post #2092 of 3072
Jesus, Bakes. Only the best for you, huh?
post #2093 of 3072
Quote:
Originally Posted by i10casual View Post

Jesus, Bakes. Only the best for you, huh?

The mossberg was used, but I don't think had ever been fired before I purchased it.

 

The Kimber was used, and I put the walnut grips, stainless slide catch, grip safety, thumb safety and hammer on.  Looks like new now, but the parts I replaced were pretty beat up.  You wouldn't recognize it if I had before/after pics.

 

The 90-Two I bought new, and when I saw that 30rd mag on their website, I had to buy it.  I used to have a PX4 sub-compact, but traded it in on the Kimber.  It was too thick to carry, and I discovered I don't like plastic guns.  It was my first hand gun in a sense.  The 90-two is actually made in Italy, while the PX4 was not.  I think there is a noticeable difference in quality between the American and Italian made Berettas

 

Pics of my over/unders to follow shortly.  Just got back from shooting skeet for the first time in a few months.

post #2094 of 3072
Very smart. Yes, the only plastic guns I like are glocks. Ugly as sin but alway go bang.
I want to start skeet shooting. How do you get started in that. I noticed some guys doing it at the outdoor range in town. It looks really fun.
I've never fired a shot gun before. Is the kick really that big?
post #2095 of 3072

You'll probably have some bruising on your shoulder after 25 rounds. I do at the beginning of each season, since I'll invariably put the gun up wrong at some point. It's a decent smack -- I always suggest that you shoot a shotgun first while not on the trap/skeet line. Most clubs will have a place where you can 'pattern' your shotgun. That's where I first shot -- 3 rounds was enough for me taht first day (I was also 9, and shooting a 20ga).

 

The best way to start is to hookup with someone to take you and give you the basics.

 

~ H
 

post #2096 of 3072

I started when I was about 11.  My Dad taught me how.  The kick isn't that bad if you get target loads.  Game loads I can see where you wouldn't want to shoot all afternoon.  That pistol grip I posted for example holds 6 rounds, but after you shoot the first three, you don't even want to finish shooting the remaining three because your wrist and hand hurt so badly.  Also, a gas operated automatic will have less perceived recoil due to the gas operated piston.  Finally, if your gun fits you well and you hold it correctly, the recoil is less of an issue.  Also, if the gun is heavier, like a skeet gun it helps, compared to a field gun which is light.  Short answer, the recoil isn't an issue if you have the right gun that fits you correctly and you hold it correctly and use the right ammunition.  They also make recoil reducers that you can put in the stock of your gun that help dissipate the recoil.

 

I would try doing an internet search of places to shoot skeet in your area.  Usually its a gun club where you have to know a member to get it.  You will probably just have to call and ask out about membership.  Where I shoot for example, is very informal and open to the idea of new members as long as they are responsible and safe.  We are completely member operated.  We only pay $150/year in membership fees, bring our own shells, reload the traps ourselves, pull for each other and give those that are learning good advice.  Once or twice a year we will have a clean up day where everyone comes down and pitches in on stuff like painting and other general maintenance.  A lot of the members have useful skills, like plumbing and wiring, so our facilities and equipment is in tip-top shape.  Someone even brought a back-hoe and dump truck this year, which some of the guys really enjoyed playing with.  Others are accountants or insurance brokers, so they are able to help out with the book keeping and liabilities of operating a gun club.  We have some that are good gunsmiths in case your gun breaks and some that are good wood workers.  One guy even carved his own stock and forend for his gun by himself.  Some of the best shooters in the country too, many have been nationally ranked, and attend the state and national championships.  Its not unusual to see someone break 100 targets in a row without missing any.  I'm not at that level yet, but my scores are very respectable.  Its like golf with a shotgun, once you get all the fundamentals down, it becomes a game of focus.  I encourage you to try it, its a lot of fun.

 

Field Gun: Beretta Silver Pigeon 12ga

 

 

 

 

Sporting Clays Gun: Beretta 682 LTD 12ga (numbered limited edition, 1500 made, mine is within the first 10%)

 

 

 

 

 

Skeet Gun: Beretta DT-10 Trident Skeet 12ga with Briley Ultra-light sub-gauge tube set

 

 

Adjustable comb and butt-plate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Briley tube set.  They are tubes that you hammer down into the barrell so that you can shoot 20, 28, and .410 gauges.  They are all matched weight, so they all feel the same and shouldn't throw  off your game or change the balance of the gun.

 

Americase

post #2097 of 3072
Those are very nice! I get to go to the Shot Show each year and I always drool on the $15,000 shotguns. Makes me want to start shooting just to use the really nice ones like you have, Thanks for the advice.
post #2098 of 3072

i'm in the market for an entry-level gun for weekend skeet shooting. i was worried i might outgrow something like the 870 rather quickly, thoughts?

post #2099 of 3072

Lots of people shoot skeet with a pump, but it certainly wouldn't be my first choice.  Probably the last.  And I agree with what you are saying about outgrowing it.  My brother-in-law just started shooting and bought a gun.  I tried to encourage him to get something nice, because if you really get in to it, you are just going to end up wanting to upgrade.  He ended up with a Beretta Silver Pigeon I, which I think was a good choice.  He got a sporting gun though, which is versatile, but if you are going to be shooting skeet I suggest getting a skeet gun.  Once I got my Skeet gun it really helped my game.  The biggest difference is is the weight and the angle/drop of the stock.  The adjustable comb is also a plus.  With a sporting gun, you are looking right in to the back of the receiver, while with a skeet gun you can see over the barrels much better.  It's also not a bad idea to look into a used gun.  Plenty of nice ones out there, and you can usually trade them back in for close to what you paid for it.  Here are a few websites that have used Berettas, as well as other makes.  I have all Berettas, but there are other good guns out there, perhaps some that are even better!  A Browning Citori would be another nice entry level over/under skeet gun.

 

joeletchenguns.com

 

pacificsportingarms.com

 

higradeshooters.com

post #2100 of 3072
I thought I would throw this out here because the guys at my Local gun shop aren't to friendly.
My Daughter is 8 and she is 49 inches tall and weighs 41 pounds ( I know she is skinny). She has a cricket and a ruger 10 20. The problem is this. She's so tiny. The cricket is great and she love it but wants something semi not bolt action. The ruger is semi but weighs to much and is truthfully to long for her as well. We wanted to start tricking out the ruger but the length and weight will still be to much. With a bi-pod she's fine. Other than that it's to much. Can anyone recommend something for a child that's not a bolt action and weighs around 3 pounds and is semi auto?


PS- We went shooting with Krish and my daughter is a better shot icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
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