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Goodyear vs. blake -- visible differences? - Page 3

post #31 of 36
Do you still wear RTW shoes Manton? (in humble awe)
post #32 of 36
Sure. I'm neither rich nor irresponsible enough to wear bespoke shoes exclusively.
post #33 of 36
resurrected from the depths of sf so do cobblers resole blake stitched shoes?
post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by mouseandcat View Post
resurrected from the depths of sf

so do cobblers resole blake stitched shoes?

Some of them will, some will do it badly. Ask around locally.
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post
Lomezz - logically speaking, you are correct. Really, the Goodyear machine is just a curved needle stitcher. In the late 1800's, the MacKay stitcher (now called Blake) greatly increased production - but re-soleing was difficult as repair shops were either slow to adapt, or could not afford the new machines. Charles Goodyear invented the curved needle stitcher that allowed the factories still doing 'old-fashioned' work to not only compete production wise, but market the shoes as easily repairable by the shops. The production was still cut and folded walls from the insole, and the shoes continued to be top notch. Thru time, someone came up with the idea of replacing this construction with 'gemming' - a glued on feather. A dedicated machine does this. Also, cheaper, thinner insoles became the norm as you didn't have to cut a wall out of them any longer. This was one of many cuts in quality that has continued to this day in the industry.

So, specifically speaking, Goodyear Welting has little to do with the insole and more to do with production; however, traditionalists argue that the 'marketers' took advantage of the new technology to cheapen the product in ways a customer might never see, and therefore increase profit margins. This was never the intent. So now, the term "Goodyear Welting" has evolved to include the type of insole used to denote a certain quality and time commitment in the production of a shoe. At least to a small, and shrinking, group of industry types.

In another thread, I had incorrectly credited DWFII for introducing the term "gemming" to this forum. Looking at the timeline again, Ron, is in fact the first person to have done so. I apologize.
post #36 of 36

Yes thats correct. Goodyear welted just means that the shoe was held against a machine. If you do a youtube search of Goodyear welt you can see the machines. Mr Goodyear invented the machine to mass produce shoes. The shoes to look out for are the Hand welted shoes

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