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Regulated Dress.

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 
Would you want to work in a firm or company that regulated your dress, whether explicitly or implicitly? I am not talking about MacDonald's.

I'd feel vaguely threatened to work in an environment where flowers on the lapel are not encouraged.
post #2 of 35
seeing as how i work in a lab, i would have to say yes.
post #3 of 35
Isn't this the only way to stop dress from degenerating into slob wear (aka 'business casual'). The problem is when the regulations get too finnickity - picky and intrusive.
post #4 of 35
Our regulations exist but are blindingly confusing. We start the week in business attire and become more casual through the week, culminating in jeans and trainers on Friday. Unless you have a customer meeting. Or unless you never see customers. Or if it is the hot season. At HO, staff members are fined at the gate if they breach the dress code, which is a bit unfair when it is so hard to figure out.
post #5 of 35
I've been pleasantly surprised at how much I can get away with at my office. This past Friday I sported violet shoes and belts and a rather vibrant pocket square. However, ties are implicitly discouraged on days where clients aren't met and cargo pants and dirty trainers are bandied about on Fridays. Such is rather disconcerting. That said, I'm not sure how much better it can get in this line of work (mgmt consulting).
post #6 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
Isn't this the only way to stop dress from degenerating into slob wear (aka 'business casual').

The problem is when the regulations get too finnickity - picky and intrusive.

Also, there's that domineering aspect of not outdressing your superiors.
post #7 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee View Post
I've been pleasantly surprised at how much I can get away with at my office. This past Friday I sported violet shoes and belts and a rather vibrant pocket square. However, ties are implicitly discouraged on days where clients aren't met and cargo pants and dirty trainers are bandied about on Fridays. Such is rather disconcerting.

That said, I'm not sure how much better it can get in this line of work (mgmt consulting).
I suppose one has to make a niche for oneself as "that dandy" from the first day.

As for it getting better in that profession--allowing one to smoke pipes.
post #8 of 35
The pay-equity debacle of the late '80s and its attendant human rights issues doomed dress codes here (Ontario) -- you couldn't have separate dress codes for male and female employees anymore, which effectively meant you ended up with no dress code at all.

Hell, my brother's trading room has a third washroom for the transgendered ...
post #9 of 35
I wear a lot of neutrals, and don't pay attention to the latest and the greatest. I think I could live with a regulated environment, so long as my clothes were comfortable and fit. During jr. high and high school, I was subject to regulation 'undress.' Compulsory nude swimming. That I could have done without.
post #10 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg1 View Post
The pay-equity debacle of the late '80s and its attendant human rights issues doomed dress codes here (Ontario) -- you couldn't have separate dress codes for male and female employees anymore, which effectively meant you ended up with no dress code at all.

Hell, my brother's trading room has a third washroom for the transgendered ...

I guess stuff like this is why Canada has been losing its reputation for about 15 years.
post #11 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
Also, there's that domineering aspect of not outdressing your superiors.

I see that type of thing mentioned a lot whenever business dress is discussed, it baffles me. I must confess to being out of that loop since my teens but...if the ultimate aim is to progress then I think dress is one of the key and least "threatening" areas in which you can signal your intent. There seems an almost overwhelming fear of standing out in the workplace, that confuses me; isn't the whole point to stand out?
post #12 of 35
isn't the whole point to stand out?
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I'd say that depends on the environment. In some cases a 'stand out' personality or appearance, might be a detriment. I've known many a working person who has gone rather far in his field, simply by doing what he or she was told to do, and by doing it well.
post #13 of 35
You'd be suprised that working in Fashion there are still many people who make comments about red patent leather tassled loafers, big floppy velvet bowties or "paper" polyester blue jackets.
post #14 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eg1 View Post
The pay-equity debacle of the late '80s and its attendant human rights issues doomed dress codes here (Ontario) -- you couldn't have separate dress codes for male and female employees anymore, which effectively meant you ended up with no dress code at all.

Hell, my brother's trading room has a third washroom for the transgendered ...

Interesting--so females and males can intermingle?
post #15 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omegablogger View Post
I see that type of thing mentioned a lot whenever business dress is discussed, it baffles me. I must confess to being out of that loop since my teens but...if the ultimate aim is to progress then I think dress is one of the key and least "threatening" areas in which you can signal your intent. There seems an almost overwhelming fear of standing out in the workplace, that confuses me; isn't the whole point to stand out?
I wonder if it would be wise to wear three-pieces with a boutonniere in one of those ubiquitous law firms and trading firms that new members always ask about.
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