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Interview with Antonio Ciongoli of Eidos Napoli, Part 1 - Page 6

post #76 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

Clarification: FOR ME an extended shoulder in unacceptable. So is more than minimal padding.
As for dignified, I refer to what I see as a Pitti freak show. Not to gentlemen who dress well and
conservatively, but have padded and/or extended shoulders. Even if I could afford it, I would
never buy Huntsman. It's my taste.

The term extended shoulder is really more of a continuum rather than a specific look, IMO. I think @A Y mentioned this in the A&S expat thread, but Mahon used to cut his shoulders to the outer edge of the arm, supposedly as he was trained to do so at A&S, but has since brought it in more, cause he finds the "extended shoulder" droops over time. FWIW, my NSM stuff is cut very snug against my shoulder, while my Steeds are cut a bit wider. Vox has had the opposite experience, so who knows if this really means anything.

In any case, while I think it's fine to talk about generalities, it's really the end look that matters. Sometimes an extended shoulder can look quite good, IMO. It's really about the overall silhouette and the wearer than any one feature.

But I also like some of the old Armani stuff, so what do I know ...
post #77 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

The term extended shoulder is really more of a continuum rather than a specific look, IMO. I think @A Y mentioned this in the A&S expat thread, but Mahon used to cut his shoulders to the outer edge of the arm, supposedly as he was trained to do so at A&S, but has since brought it in more, cause he finds the "extended shoulder" droops over time. FWIW, my NSM stuff is cut very snug against my shoulder, while my Steeds are cut a bit wider. Vox has had the opposite experience, so who knows if this really means anything.

In any case, while I think it's fine to talk about generalities, it's really the end look that matters. Sometimes an extended shoulder can look quite good, IMO. It's really about the overall silhouette and the wearer than any one feature.

But I also like some of the old Armani stuff, so what do I know ...

Coincidentally, Vox posted this on tumblr today:



I think anyone that tries to argue against the elegance conveyed by the silhouette of the Nicholas brothers' jackets (typified by an extended shoulder and narrow waist) is fighting a steep uphill battle.
post #78 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


When you say being in certain stores can help with the growth of a brand -- do you mean in raising the prestige or just in terms of moving units? I remember in the 90s, being in certain stores was key for young labels, as it was a way to be "validated." In other words, certain boutiques were portals to a demographic or region, and they helped introduce your line to the public. It would be better, in fact, to only be carried by certain stores and no one else (if that helped your chances of getting in those stores), rather than being in every store but the key ones. In Los Angeles, Fred Segal used to be really important for younger designers. Louis Boston also introduced a lot of Italian tailoring to the Boston area, and later the US.

Is that really still the case today? Is that only with brick and mortars, or is it online as well? I can't think of any online store where I think "oh well, if this store is carrying it, it must be awesome." I might be way off track here.

Addendum: Actually, I guess maybe Self Edge is one. But I can't think of any others.

Brand adjacency is wicked important.  I'v schemed many hours on how to get X designer into A+ retailer.  For a starting retailer, and particularly a pure play, it's really hard.  Often, it comes down to who you knwo who trusts your judgement and may or who may or may not owe you a favor.This is not meant as some sort of expose.  It's the same in any business.  Sometimes, it's getting brand Z owned or represented by a friend or close colleague first.  That draws in brand Y, which in turn will make designer X consider the store seriously.  For a lot of retailers, celebrity endorsements are also important.  There are entire stores whose premise is based on selling the items that so and so was seen in while buying groceries.

 

Online today - Tres Bien Shop and Mr. Porter are both considered by some brands to be pretty important stores.  Trunk, which is loosely associated with Monocle, etc...  Yeah, these stores exist.  And of course, the big boys, like the Bergdorf Goodmans and the Barneys and the Maxfields of the world.

post #79 of 81
Great thread. Those interested in some of Antonio's design theories (or whatever the phrase should be) should watch this -
http://youtu.be/REA2YWA467U

(For those that want to "like" and watch later here is a Tumblr link - http://linenforsummertweedforwinter.tumblr.com/post/82238548062/tredicielupo-high-hat-aside-the-eidos-napoli).
post #80 of 81
Part 2 up now (not sure nobody links them or maybe I am jumping the gun) - http://www.styleforum.net/t/405462/interview-with-antonio-ciongoli-of-eidos-napoli-part-2
post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

Fwiw, this was the only thing I saw at Pitti that I wanted to take right off the mannequin and put in my suitcase.

I believe I noted the exact same thing. I'm glad to see the interview up, and I'm glad that I didn't get a chance to do an SW+D one - I wouldn't have had a clue what to ask about, and wouldn't have had a clue what Antonio was talking about anyway.
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