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Ongoing Bespoke Projects - Page 124

post #1846 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by sprout2 View Post

@Leaves
is this Loro Piana Pecora fabric?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


I'm fairly certain Andreas said the fabric was from H&S.
post #1847 of 2114
@dieworkwear

I absolutely love Chittleborough and Morgan. The clothes are fantastic - though clearly of a very particular style. I have a couple of suits, this jacket and also an overcoat in the works and I bring them out for classic power dressing; and also for more glamorous evenings out. Wore a three piece peak lapel suit by them to a Paris Fashion week party and it got a lot of positive attention. They are also my wife's favourite jackets because of the silhouette

The style is very different to the Steed suits and jaxkets I normally wear (and even further from my NsM / Corcos stuff). Not sure it is a style that works for all types of clothes (wouldn't have them make tweed jackets for example) - but the attention to fit and finishing is truly second to none. The service is also exceptional. They have even repaired garments of mine from other makers if they notice a ripped lining or anything similar during a fitting

Two things to bear in mind, however: 1) They are perfectionists and all of my clothes have taken 6-8 fittings (so you can't be in a hurry); 2) They cut very close (so you had better not put on any weight)

If you are happy to embark on a long process I would definitely go with them

R-O-T
post #1848 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by R.O. Thornhill View Post

@dieworkwear

I absolutely love Chittleborough and Morgan. The clothes are fantastic - though clearly of a very particular style. I have a couple of suits, this jacket and also an overcoat in the works and I bring them out for classic power dressing; and also for more glamorous evenings out. Wore a three piece peak lapel suit by them to a Paris Fashion week party and it got a lot of positive attention. They are also my wife's favourite jackets because of the silhouette Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The style is very different to the Steed suits and jaxkets I normally wear (and even further from my NsM / Corcos stuff). Not sure it is a style that works for all types of clothes (wouldn't have them make tweed jackets for example) - but the attention to fit and finishing is truly second to none. The service is also exceptional. They have even repaired garments of mine from other makers if they notice a ripped lining or anything similar during a fitting

Two things to bear in mind, however: 1) They are perfectionists and all of my clothes have taken 6-8 fittings (so you can't be in a hurry); 2) They cut very close (so you had better not put on any weight)

If you are happy to embark on a long process I would definitely go with them

R-O-T

Thanks for all those details, R-O-T.

Don't mind the wait or the extra fittings. Kind of nice to hear they're that detailed, actually.

Any reason why you wouldn't use them for tweed? Too heavy and stiff?

Also, do you find the silhouette to be good for casual suits or sport coats? I rarely wear serious business suits, unfortunately.

Lastly, any experience with other tailoring houses with a structured shoulder? I was looking at a few SR houses. Also thinking about Edward Sexton.
post #1849 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Thanks for all those details, R-O-T.

Don't mind the wait or the extra fittings. Kind of nice to hear they're that detailed, actually.

Any reason why you wouldn't use them for tweed? Too heavy and stiff?

Also, do you find the silhouette to be good for casual suits or sport coats? I rarely wear serious business suits, unfortunately.

Lastly, any experience with other tailoring houses with a structured shoulder? I was looking at a few SR houses. Also thinking about Edward Sexton.

I had some Kilgour stuff made years and years ago (there may even be some photos around but this is a long time ago) - and C&M is infinitely superior. And god knows what Kilgour makes now

I personally think C&M's strong shoulder, long flared skirt, close fit works best at the more formal end of the spectrum. I just can't imagine one of their jackets with jeans or corduroy trousers. It really works best when the whole look is consistent. Am going to have them make some flannels to go with the jacket I have to this point (double pleat, high waisted). Am thinking the overcoat may be an exception. Will see when I get it

Think the same would be true of Sexton. The cut is just very formal and unlike most (even tailored) clothing you see around

If you don't wear business suits much but still want to give them a try I would recommend a kick-ass "cocktail suit" (mohair, sharkskin, or their signature navy seersucker)

R-O-T
post #1850 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by R.O. Thornhill View Post

I had some Kilgour stuff made years and years ago (there may even be some photos around but this is a long time ago) - and C&M is infinitely superior. And god knows what Kilgour makes now
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I personally think C&M's strong shoulder, long flared skirt, close fit works best at the more formal end of the spectrum. I just can't imagine one of their jackets with jeans or corduroy trousers. It really works best when the whole look is consistent. Am going to have them make some flannels to go with the jacket I have to this point (double pleat, high waisted). Am thinking the overcoat may be an exception. Will see when I get it

Think the same would be true of Sexton. The cut is just very formal and unlike most (even tailored) clothing you see around

If you don't wear business suits much but still want to give them a try I would recommend a kick-ass "cocktail suit" (mohair, sharkskin, or their signature navy seersucker)

R-O-T

That makes sense. I rarely wear sport coats with jeans though. You think the cut would be too striking for sport coats with odd trousers?

Any thoughts on the structured shoulder look with a non-flared skirt? I think if I went to Edward Sexton, I would keep the flared skirt given how he makes such a signature look. But wondering if it's a bad idea to go with non-flared for other houses.

Cocktail suit actually sounds really good. Still leaning towards a sport coat given that California is such as casual state, but that's a great idea.
post #1851 of 2114
On trousers it is just important that the look is coherent. So trousers would need to be with a lot of shape and prob a high waist.

I think the structures shoulder looks better with a longer coat and more flared skirt. Maybe not necessarily as long as those from C&M but not too far off it. If you are going structured you might as well go dramatic. The conservative structured look has limited appeal to me

I would go for a navy odd jacket similar to mine (or DB) or a cocktail suit. Actually think the latter would be awesome
post #1852 of 2114
The other Steed overcoat - having suffered through a whole day of travel and being flung over meeting chairs

post #1853 of 2114

I like some pieces made for A.Cvetkovic by Sexton.

 

 

I don't know if there is a huge difference in cut/finishing between Sexton and C&M, but both houses seem to have a similar ethos. Their cut is rather flamboyant but oddly they do not promote themselves in the media as much as others. Neither they show any pride of being in the row for decades or centuries. Ok, let's assume their signature look has been there only from the 60-70's, but still. 

post #1854 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by R.O. Thornhill View Post

The other Steed overcoat - having suffered through a whole day of travel and being flung over meeting chairs


Quote:
Originally Posted by aristoi bcn View Post

I like some pieces made for A.Cvetkovic by Sexton.




I don't know if there is a huge difference in cut/finishing between Sexton and C&M, but both houses seem to have a similar ethos. Their cut is rather flamboyant but oddly they do not promote themselves in the media as much as others. Neither they show any pride of being in the row for decades or centuries. Ok, let's assume their signature look has been there only from the 60-70's, but still. 

Both great here
post #1855 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by aristoi bcn View Post

I like some pieces made for A.Cvetkovic by Sexton. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



I don't know if there is a huge difference in cut/finishing between Sexton and C&M, but both houses seem to have a similar ethos. Their cut is rather flamboyant but oddly they do not promote themselves in the media as much as others. Neither they show any pride of being in the row for decades or centuries. Ok, let's assume their signature look has been there only from the 60-70's, but still. 

That looks great. Was thinking about getting a single breasted, peak label, tan wool gabardine suit from Steed this year. Talked to a friend about it and he convinced me a SBPL only really works for formal garments, like a summer evening jacket in midnight or navy silk. Think that's solid advice.

Wouldn't be opposed to getting something like that, or a cocktail suit. If I went to Sexton, I think I'd do a SBPL since he's one of the few who consistently knocks it out the park.
Quote:
Originally Posted by R.O. Thornhill View Post

The other Steed overcoat - having suffered through a whole day of travel and being flung over meeting chairs

Really like the lapels on that.
post #1856 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post


That looks great. Was thinking about getting a single breasted, peak label, tan wool gabardine suit from Steed this year. Talked to a friend about it and he convinced me a SBPL only really works for formal garments, like a summer evening jacket in midnight or navy silk. Think that's solid advice.

 

I think that's nonsense. But then, I would.

post #1857 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

I think that's nonsense. But then, I would.

I think the thing I settled on is that it's less binary and more of a scale. SBPL is probably easier to pull off with some tailors, harder with others, because it's such a unique style and so much depends on variables that you, as a customer, can't easily communicate or control. The exact shape of the belly, peak angle, width of the lapel, etc. Feel like there's more uncertainty than with a standard notch lapel.

Also seems trickier in some fabrics than others. Certainly not a hard rule. I like that tan jacket worn by Jean Claude Ellena (I think you saw it). That's what originally inspired me to get peak lapels on this tan suit. But It's probably easier in something very formal, like an evening jacket.

Also probably depends on the dresser (I like the one Steed made for you).

With all that, it just seems like there's more risk as you go from one end of the scale to the other. Easy choice for dinner suits; harder for something super casual (olive cotton suit, maybe).

All in all, I'm a little cautious on a suit order since it's an expensive commission. And the lapels, from what I understand, can't be changed. So if it turns out bad, you're stuck. Maybe a bit too risky for my taste, at least on this tan suit.

I like this commission from Mark though. It's by Liverano and based off his pattern for dinner suits.

post #1858 of 2114
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Also seems trickier in some fabrics than others. Certainly not a hard rule. I like that tan jacket worn by Jean Claude Ellena (I think you saw it). That's what originally inspired me to get peak lapels on this tan suit. But It's probably easier in something very formal, like an evening jacket.

Also probably depends on the dresser (I like the one Steed made for you).

With all that, it just seems like there's more risk as you go from one end of the scale to the other. Easy choice for dinner suits; harder for something super casual (olive cotton suit, maybe).

 

I think it's fair to say that peak lapels on a single-breasted jacket is a riskier choice and I think you have to be very clear-eyed about that. When I commissioned my blue linen suit from Steed, I explicitly told Edwin that I wanted something a little out of the ordinary, hence the peak lapel. Edwin, it seems to me, is always interested in something that is off the beaten path so he was encouraging. It's also true to say that whenever I see a SBPL jacket, it does not look particularly unusual or daring to me. I think you are more conservative than I am in that respect. Like everything else in this domain, if you want that look, you have to feel good about it. You certainly don't want to commission something that you are going to constantly be apologizing to yourself for--it simply won't get worn.

post #1859 of 2114

That classic Mark Cho cro-magnon hunch :bounce2:

post #1860 of 2114
I don't mind Cho's suit, but that shirt collar kills the whole outfit. Causes a very much unbalanced and distracting effect.
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