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Ongoing Bespoke Projects - Page 73

post #1081 of 1727
"You ... don't know what you want. Luigi knows ... what you want."

post #1082 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by agjiffy View Post

He isn't the most expensive. Not even close. And while there is a little bit of herd mentality here with respect to trying different tailors I don't think people who are paying four figures for a pair of pants are sticking with a tailor who makes a bad pair "because they can." I think Ambrosi's performance is all over the map. Some customers like emptym are clearly getting a good product time and time again. Others are getting a mix and some are having bad experiences. So depending on who you ask you will get a pretty wide range of responses. For my money he isn't good enough.

Would you pay more if the experience and product was up to par?
post #1083 of 1727
Why would he have to pay more for the product to be as he originally wanted and was promised?
post #1084 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Would you pay more if the experience and product was up to par?

I'm not sure I understand what you are asking but I currently use two tailors and both charge similar prices to ambrosi, maybe a little more. I've generally found that, ambrosi notwithstanding, pricing is consistent with quality. I've had much better and more consistent results, and significantly more willingness to stand behind the product, with the tailors charging top dollar. I spent years trying to find find a second, less expensive tailor and eventually decided that paying a higher price was worth it. So I think the answer to your question is yes.
post #1085 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by C&A View Post

Funny you mention Raffaele Iorio. He doesn't get mentioned a lot on this board, blogs or instagram. Or have you seen some of his stuff irl?
Why no mention of the post-Rubinacci Gennaro Paone stuff? Imo his work is certainly up there with his contemporaries Gennaro Solito, Antonio Panico and Raffaele Iorio that you do mention.

Enough M. Brosi talk I think!
post #1086 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

can we agree that not every fit "problem" is always the tailor's fault? I've attended A LOT of fittings in the last couple years and it is clear to me that some customers are unable to articulate their preferences clearly, even when they have two opportunities to do so (order and basted fitting). Not to mention that customers (especially those with little experience with bespoke) are sometimes plain wrong about their requests or assessment (I know I have been one of those guys) - it takes time and some wear to understand what is a good fit, and then again to articulate some of those preferences clearly.
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
My best advice is to (a) trust the tailor without micro-managing (the absolute worst results are always when a customer takes a tape to the jacket and starts a long list of requests) BUT (b) to open your eyes and mouth at the basted fitting stage. Is the jacket the length you like? It will be much harder to fix that later. Do you like the feeling around the chest and waist when it's pinned? If you have a preference for more room or something leaner, speak up. There's a spectrum of fits that are perfectly correct in absolute but may be very different from one person's preference to the other.

My other point is that tailors are not immune to screwing up. Everyone makes mistakes. Often, everything is great after two fittings. But sometimes, a commission needs more work and a few rounds of further alterations. An experienced tailor will go through those motions and correct the issues.

But when it's the customer who is being impossible about nits and things that are just not realistic - we're talking about cloth that moves and stretches and people whose waist expands after a big lunch yet somehow expects millimetric perfection with fittings that are several months apart...

In my experience in the last two years, 75% of bespoke commissions turn out very well after basted fittings, 20%+ require further work after forward fitting (more than just sleeve length or hems) and 3-4% will never be right because the customer has an unreasonable state of mind about the whole thing. So a very small minority overall. Most issues can be worked and resolved.

Final point is that one MUST take into account cultural differences in expressing themselves when dealing with people from other countries. Some Italian tailors will shrug and be "confrontational" about discussed fit issues (saving face) - but then will absolutely do the work to get you all the fixes you want, so that they can be proud of their work and the fact that you're satisfied with it.



a lot of American customers are very deadpan about their satisfaction with the tailor's work. It isn't anyone's fault - it's part of our cultural upbringing - but understanding these differences in expressing ideas and impressions, can only help in developing a better rapport between people. Be more expressive, tell your tailor how happy you are if he did a nice job for you.

 

 

Having no experience with bespoke, only one MTM suit, I want to ask this; would it be considered rude to use a well fitting suit, sport coat, or pair of trousers as an example of what I consider to be a well fitting piece? I ask because, having measured many items of my own clothing, I realize measurements aren't everything and the shape of a garment can make a difference.  I can cross my arms comfortably in a sport coat that measures the same across the chest and slightly smaller in the shoulders, and when I have my blazer on I can almost cross my arms but the fabric pulls slightly in the back.  The blazer has more structure though, and the shape of the back is different.  As it takes the shape of my shoulders and chest it is becoming more comfortable, and most of my jackets have lighter canvassing.  It takes time to adjust, which is certainly something I am going to remember in the future.

 

I guess my point is, a tailor could spot other things I might not see or be able to verbalize well.  The tailor could do this by simply looking at the piece of clothing I considered to be well fitting if I wore it there and didn't insist on a copy of it, but used it as an example of a well fitting piece I am comfortable in all day.

 

edited to add: on my MTM suit, the shop owner measured a suit coat they had in stock that fit me well and measured trousers I was picking up that day.  That's where the idea for this post came from, if it seems bizarre.

post #1087 of 1727
First fitting of my double-breasted overcoat from Zaremba. Cloth is navy wool 760 grms 25 oz from Dugdale.







post #1088 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintSplattered View Post


Having no experience with bespoke, only one MTM suit, I want to ask this; would it be considered rude to use a well fitting suit, sport coat, or pair of trousers as an example of what I consider to be a well fitting piece?

A lot of times a tailor will ask you to wear something you like or think fits well to the initial consult. And even if they don't, knowing and referencing what you like is what the bespoke experience is all about. A good tailor will likely crank out something perfectly nice even if you're totally mum about what you want. However, as has been mentioned here, their idea of what works well may not be yours. And so any insight you can lend will make for a better result (albeit on a subjective, personal level).
post #1089 of 1727

Last fitting for a navy sharkskin suit from Kotaro Miyahira:

 

 

 

Trousers will be shortened slightly (as seen on the right leg) and vents will be closed, other from that we are good to go. 

 

Regards, 

 

Oliver

post #1090 of 1727

A fitting for a "shooting jacket" with Steed today in London:

 

post #1091 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

A fitting for a "shooting jacket" with Steed today in London:



I think the jacket will look better as a 3 r 2.5. Are you planning on having the leather piece on top of your shoulder?
post #1092 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

A fitting for a "shooting jacket" with Steed today in London:


Are you worried this will look contumey and affected where you live?
post #1093 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordsuperb View Post


I think the jacket will look better as a 3 r 2.5. Are you planning on having the leather piece on top of your shoulder?

 

I respect your opinion. But it's a 2-button. I'm not going to have a leather piece added. I discussed with Edwin having some quilting over the left shoulder (as I'm left handed), but we agreed that would be too much with all the other details.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian mcfox View Post


Are you worried this will look contumey and affected where you live?

 

Have we just met? :)

 

No, I'm not. The only obvious thing is that the jacket has bellows pockets...well, that and the box pleat and half belt in back. I don't think it will look costumey. Matthew started calling it a shooting jacket. I just wanted it to look a certain way...but after we started calling it that it sort of took on a life of its own!

post #1094 of 1727
Ah, didn't realise you weren't opting for a leather shoulder guard (which would have pushed it over the edge for me). Good call, I think this will look great.
post #1095 of 1727
Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian mcfox View Post

Ah, didn't realise you weren't opting for a leather shoulder guard (which would have pushed it over the edge for me). Good call, I think this will look great.

I have a friend in San Francisco who's a restaurateur and hunter. He wears shooting jackets for sport, but also for casual use. I don't know if the shooting patch would suit Andy, but I also don't think they're necessarily costumey either.
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