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What to look for in an apartment

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
My fiance and I are looking to move into a new apartment, and I was hoping some of you guys can shed some light on the types of things that one should be aware of or should look for when looking at places.

What kind of things indicate potential problems or pitfalls? Also, what questions should one ask the landlord to weed information out of them that's useful?

Thanks.
post #2 of 19
If there is a peephole in the wall of the bedroom, stay away.
Also if the super is named Norman Bates.
post #3 of 19
1. What. Are. The. Neighbors. Like.
2. Nice to find out what kind of arrangements are made for snow removal
3. Pets
4. Apartment Modification Rules -- paint, holes in walls, etc.
5. Requirements to be met to receive return of security deposit
6. Age related stuff -- pay attention to the windows/sealing for drafts and such.


That's all that occurs to me at present, beyond the obvious. Since you are a lawyer I won't have to tell you to RTFC, for a change. Amazing how many merely sign, on the dotted line.

Best,
Huntsman
post #4 of 19
Check the water pressure/temperature in the shower. Ask about what basic utilities are provided. If heats included do you have control over the temperature, same for AC.

Ask about the laundry room if thats important to you.

Check to see if you get cell reception inside the apartment

You could ask about other people who live in the building. That is do they rent to students, young professionals, families, etc... Depending on who else lives in the building it could greatly effect your experience living there.

Also try to get an idea of how thick the walls are and how much you can hear from other peoples apartments.

Ask about what happens if you have a problem, is there a live in maintenance person who would be available 24/7.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Damn, thanks for the tips, a lot of that stuff is stuff I wouldn't have thought of. Of course, RTFC is second nature.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradstudent78 View Post
Check the water pressure/temperature in the shower. Ask about what basic utilities are provided. If heats included do you have control over the temperature, same for AC. Ask about the laundry room if thats important to you. Check to see if you get cell reception inside the apartment You could ask about other people who live in the building. That is do they rent to students, young professionals, families, etc... Depending on who else lives in the building it could greatly effect your experience living there. Also try to get an idea of how thick the walls are and how much you can hear from other peoples apartments. Ask about what happens if you have a problem, is there a live in maintenance person who would be available 24/7.
Get an apartment with a good view. It helps make up for anything you may discover inadequate once you move in.
post #7 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post
My fiance and I are looking to move into a new
apartment, and I was hoping some of you guys can shed some light on the types of
things that one should be aware of or should look for when looking at places.

What kind of things indicate potential problems or pitfalls? Also, what questions
should one ask the landlord to weed information out of them that's useful?

Thanks.

  • Lease terms and penalty to break lease.
  • Central Air with time-programmable thermostat or 'You are welcome to put an AC in the window.

  • In-unit clothes washer and dryer or hours of shared laundry room.
  • doorman ?
    Central Air with time-programmable thermostat or 'You are welcome to put an AC in the window.
  • loading zone or reserved parking by your doorstaep ?
  • Secure parking
  • Storage closet in basement.
  • Cable and internet services available to your unit.
post #8 of 19
Are you looking for pre-war?
post #9 of 19
Parking is a biggie. I'd also ask how often cars in the parking lot are broken into (this happened to me a few weeks after moving into a new place).

Laundry.
post #10 of 19
Big things for me were:

- abundance of outlets -- I don't like having to deal with the mess of unplugging things to plug other things in.

- energy efficiency.

- walkable groceries, banking, etc.

- no creepy bathrooms. I passed on a gorgeous apartment because it had an old-style clawfoot tub, etc. That shit creeps me out.
post #11 of 19
electrical outlets are important
parking either included or nearby
wind direction - how airy it is
heating and cooling options
utilities costs
how secure the doors and windows are - the best is not top floor, and not ground floor, and with a heavy door
proximety to transportation and traffic
what the nieghbors on top of you are like
post #12 of 19
I think njguido.com has an apartment listing service.

What to look for:
-Near Djai's
-Parking spot for Camaro
-Stripper pole
-Enough room for your Goombas to hang out.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckwith View Post
I think njguido.com has an apartment listing service. What to look for: -Near Djai's -Parking spot for Camaro -Stripper pole -Enough room for your Goombas to hang out.
lol. We knock the Guidos, but their women have some hella-nice racks. They also have STD's, mind you.
post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beckwith View Post
I think njguido.com has an apartment listing service.

What to look for:
-Near Djai's
-Parking spot for Camaro
-Stripper pole
-Enough room for your Goombas to hang out.


All roads lead to D'jais my friend. But yeah, you're right - there has to be enough room for my paisons to crash. And I traded in the Camaro a long time ago pal...

Conne - somebody's been poking around njguido.com a lot I see. But, they'd never let a wannabe mick like you into D'jais - you might have better luck at this place:
post #15 of 19
I think that anything that I have to contribute has already been said, but in my experience things that people often overlook but later regret are: - How thick are the walls/floors/ceilings; and - How many power outlets and telephone jacks does the place have? My apartment is almost twenty years old, and is quite large - three bedrooms, separate lounge and dining room, and a large verandah at the front and a courtyard out the back. It's right next to public transport and is close to cafes and shops. It's on top of a hill so we have lovely views and also get nice breezes on summer afternoons and evenings. It's solid brick and concrete and so we hardly even hear the neighbours. So far so good. However, there is only telephone jack in the entire apartment and that is, for some reason, located in one corner of the smallest bedroom. In these days of cordless phones with base stations, it's not such an issue as it used to be. However, it is still a frustration and I can't help but wonder why on earth the builder chose to wire the jack into such an inconvenient location. Similarly, the dining room has three powerpoints - two on one wall and one on the opposite wall. We have no use for any of them. Curiously, however, the living room has only one powerpoint. When we first bought the place, I was really happy about the solid construction - and it is great at insulating the place, both in terms of sound and temperature. However, the solid concrete construction also means that it is virtually impossible to reroute wires or to install new jacks or power outlets. I wanted to have a combination light/heater installed in the bathroom ceiling but was told that due to the narrowness of the conduit that had been used to originally wire the bathroom light, that it would be impossible for the electrician to install a heater/light combination unless he pulled out the original wiring and then gouged a channel from the lightswitch, up the wall and across the ceiling to the light fitting. I declined his offer. A friend of mine bought an apartment next to a mad alcoholic a few years back - it was blissful when the neighbour went into rehab every few months, but it was hellish when he was there, as he would wake up in the night and start screaming and shouting imprecations at all and sundry, whilst thumping on the walls. As he owned the apartment, there was little that could be done about him, and if they called the police it only served to inflame the situation. My friend finally managed to sell his apartment and promptly bought a house, with a vow to never again live in an apartment.
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