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HOF: What Are You Wearing Right Now - Part IV (starting May 2014) - Page 2474

post #37096 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Something I have been thinking on as I begin a biography of Beau Brummell and read Roycru's comments... It seems to me that there are two kinds of ways of propagating rules, unspoken and enumerated. Unspoken rules are those which dominate those who are, for lack of a better term, in the know. Some understand that wearing a tuxedo to a cocktail party is gauche almost as a matter of instinct. Others have to be told, often through confusing and foolish dress codes written on invitation cards. For those who were born into a certain social strata the rules weren't rules at all. They were simply known and accepted norms of behavior. Kind of like how guitarists would never "touch another man's axe" without permission. These accepted norms of behavior only became rules when those not in the know had to be instructed on them during the great democratization process that engulfed the U.S. from the 1870s to the 1950s. By this I don't mean to belittle the so called rules. Indeed, I imagine few of us were brought up in the privileged lifestyle that I reference here. I know I wasn't. However, as one delves deeper and deeper into the sartorial history of the western man, as he understands it's idiosyncrasies more and more, and as he begins to obtain a nuanced understanding of what he is dealing with, he begins to understand that there really are no rules. Just accepted norms of behavior. And when he understands this he is fully equipped to bend and adapt those norms to his needs. 

Very well stated. I stick by the advice in "The Suit." Dress as conservative as you have to and as dandified as you can get away with. I think of all the sartorial writing out there Parisian Gentleman is one of the best, especially Dirnelli who calls it like he sees it.

I do think that rules are a great equalizer, kind of like like school uniforms. Lots of ways to stand out of course even while sticking to the rules.
Edited by smittycl - 5/4/16 at 6:18pm
post #37097 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post
 

@Pliny is that one of the Oyster cloths you were less than impressed with? Looks quite nice.

 

@Mr. Six awesome tie :slayer:

 

 

No.  I'd recommend the range from my limited experience of it.  Others speak highly of its character.

post #37098 of 43873
Quote:

Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

 

Something I have been thinking on as I begin a biography of Beau Brummell and read Roycru's comments... It seems to me that there are two kinds of ways of propagating rules, unspoken and enumerated. Unspoken rules are those which dominate those who are, for lack of a better term, in the know. Some understand that wearing a tuxedo to a cocktail party is gauche almost as a matter of instinct. Others have to be told, often through confusing and foolish dress codes written on invitation cards. For those who were born into a certain social strata the rules weren't rules at all. They were simply known and accepted norms of behavior. Kind of like how guitarists would never "touch another man's axe" without permission. These accepted norms of behavior only became rules when those not in the know had to be instructed on them during the great democratization process that engulfed the U.S. from the 1870s to the 1950s. By this I don't mean to belittle the so called rules. Indeed, I imagine few of us were brought up in the privileged lifestyle that I reference here. I know I wasn't. However, as one delves deeper and deeper into the sartorial history of the western man, as he understands it's idiosyncrasies more and more, and as he begins to obtain a nuanced understanding of what he is dealing with, he begins to understand that there really are no rules. Just accepted norms of behavior. And when he understands this he is fully equipped to bend and adapt those norms to his needs. 




 


This is good observation. Values of any society (any dominance hierarchy, to be precise) are determined by its elite (or ruling class, if you will)*


Members of the society (non-delinquent ones) try to adopt bahaviors that are likely to enable them to climb the hierarchy. Before "democratization", you could point your finger to the elite and just copy what they do. The problem now (especially in North America, and it is kind of invented there) is that there almost is no class beyond one defined by money. It is even very politically incorrect nowdays to claim that someone is of "higher class" unless he has worked his own way up.


Therefore, people adopt rules (SF rules for example), because other wise who is the elite to emulate? Trump? Kim & Kanye? Klintons? 


 


@smittycl- Parisian Gentleman is very good partly because it doesn't take the "rule" approach, but first takes historic, cultural (and a bit elitist) approach. I also like it very much.


 


* Just look at the societies that have lost or got rid of their elites. They are always in big problems. How people dress is the least of their troubles.

post #37099 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakv View Post

Noodles, details on the shoes, please.
C&J Hallams
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sander View Post

The shirt in itself I wouödn't wear, the microstructure is just too busy. Pink can look great, but only a fresh, clear pink imo.
Suits are from sosr I suppose?
Very basic, very nice. Only personal nitpick: I know many people say you can wear a white square with everything and of course you can; personally, I wear them only if some part of my shirt is also white (like in a white/light blue stripe). Otherwise, the square sometimes stands out too much as the only stark white item. Edit: hm, your shirt has just that. Hm. The square still stands out too much I think.
Hahaha.
I know what you mean and I can see it. The white on my shirt...actually there is no white on my shirt, it is darker blue and lighter blue.
post #37100 of 43873


Pocket square help needed.
post #37101 of 43873



Ring
Zegna
Francesco Serraiocco
Christian Kimber
Panta
Edward Green
post #37102 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by An Acute Style View Post
 

New shirt.  Purple bengal stripe from Spier & Mackay.  

 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

That jacket is a stunner.  Shirt, jacket, tie color combination is nice too  imo.  I would change the buttons for brown horn.

post #37103 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by coop23us View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Pocket square help needed.

 

Easy. Unpick the tie and have it re-sewn into a pocket square.

post #37104 of 43873

#57. I borrowed @Andy57's BB cord trousers for today's fit.

 

 

 

 

Sartore - Kamakura - Brooks Brothers - Kamakura - Sea-Gull - Paolo da Ponte - Brooks Brothers - Pantherella - C&J

post #37105 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

#57. I borrowed @Andy57's BB cord trousers for today's fit.

 

I was wondering where they'd gotten to.

post #37106 of 43873
Today.

9883514cfaa79f012a0cf3586920d45f.jpg
Details (Click to show)
* Suitsupply
* Osovski shirt
* tie and pocketsquare by Poszetka
* Yanko oxfords

cbe5aa30c52bd7cc561a6015621d6e80.jpg

59d9de4da775ac5972731f69d9498ecc.jpg

59f4904bd613a4d2f0e0925f2cd2b6c5.jpg

Rather quiet, maybe a little bit boring. Feedback is appreciated.
post #37107 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post
 

Something I have been thinking on as I begin a biography of Beau Brummell and read Roycru's comments... It seems to me that there are two kinds of ways of propagating rules, unspoken and enumerated. Unspoken rules are those which dominate those who are, for lack of a better term, in the know. Some understand that wearing a tuxedo to a cocktail party is gauche almost as a matter of instinct. Others have to be told, often through confusing and foolish dress codes written on invitation cards. For those who were born into a certain social strata the rules weren't rules at all. They were simply known and accepted norms of behavior. Kind of like how guitarists would never "touch another man's axe" without permission. These accepted norms of behavior only became rules when those not in the know had to be instructed on them during the great democratization process that engulfed the U.S. from the 1870s to the 1950s. By this I don't mean to belittle the so called rules. Indeed, I imagine few of us were brought up in the privileged lifestyle that I reference here. I know I wasn't. However, as one delves deeper and deeper into the sartorial history of the western man, as he understands it's idiosyncrasies more and more, and as he begins to obtain a nuanced understanding of what he is dealing with, he begins to understand that there really are no rules. Just accepted norms of behavior. And when he understands this he is fully equipped to bend and adapt those norms to his needs. 

 

I have i slightly different point of view on the matter.

I agree that "rules" are a great help for any begginers, and since we're not begginers anymore, we should be able to bend them, or simply discard them.

 

But i do believe that every item of cloth has an history, anf thus was created for a purpose.

I do believe that aesthetics have a strong influence.

 

Thus i believe in something i like to call "consistency" (actually, i say coherence in french, but wathever).

 

Let's use the exemple of Oxfords & Derbies:

Yes, oxfords are to be worn with suits and derbies with separates. The logic behind that is that oxfords were meant for the city, and derbies for the country. Thus, oxfords are more formal, and derbies are more casual.

So without bending any rule, it would seem logic to use derbies with a casual suit - let's say an unstructured linen suit with patch pockets.

 

So rules are not useless, but we should just take time to think about why they were made up.

 

So here's my two cent on the matter.

 

PS: Sorry for my english, it has been quite some time since i have not practiced it.

post #37108 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by smittycl View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luger View Post


Use spoilers gosh darn it!
post #37109 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tibor View Post

Exactly, that's why I no longer take the time to explain to people who don't know or don't care to know.

Fair enough, but it often looks like you're dressed for a period film.
post #37110 of 43873
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

I love how Cox wears fedoras in such a way as to not at all seem like costume.

Bingo!
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