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HOF: What Are You Wearing Right Now - Part IV (starting May 2014) - Page 2322

post #34816 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anden View Post

+ looking busy with an iphone. 

Ha - I do this, but only because I use the iPhone as a wireless remote for a real camera
post #34817 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian mcfox View Post

Ha - I do this, but only because I use the iPhone as a wireless remote for a real camera

Guilty. I did however try to look extra occupied. What camera do you use? I just upgraded my A7R to the A7RII.
post #34818 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caustic Man View Post

Question for the gallery with reference to this latest discussion on (un)structured jackets. How do you relate structure with formality? I don't equate structure with formality generally speaking. Being completely unstructured certainly seems more casual to me because of the slouchy look it generally has. Other than that, whether something has a lot of padding or a little, it doesn't go into my reckoning of how formal it is. I have seen very slightly padded tuxedos and tailcoats that look quite formal and highly structured sport coats that look very casual indeed. 

It did, me. smile.gif
Slouchy look is from no canvassing. You can have an unpacked shoulder with light or heavy canvassing and maintain a clean chest. Some jackets have enough canvassing that comes up from the chest panel to the shoulder that negates the need for passing if one already has relatively high or square shoulders.
post #34819 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

@rajesh06
 : Thanks for progressing from lurker to poster.

Blunt comments on personal grooming are generally considered in poor taste on this forum, so instead I'll tell a story. A few years ago I decided to try dyeing my hair, as I was starting to go a bit grey. I thought it looked ok. Nobody else did. My older brother in particular, a real silverfox if ever there was one, made some withering asides which left me feeling somewhat personally diminished. Eventually I gave up my fight, fight against the dyeing of the light, and just embraced my developing follicular fade-to-grey.

You seem to be engaged in a similar losing battle with your male-pattern alopecia. Perhaps time to regroup?

Good catch - I did dye my hair yesterday - as I do every time I get my hair cut. I have it done professionally - not at home. I appreciate your comments - but everyone else has been complimentary. Every few years - there is a timing issue where I cant get to the guy who does my hair (travel schedules, holidays, etc) and my wife gets annoyed. I personally feel like it makes me look five years younger.

Anyway - I think the graying and the balding are two separate issues - I don't do anything to address the latter.

A couple issues - I took those pictures at the end of the day - and a particularity windy day. I did nothing to fix my hair - particularly in the full shot. Though they wash my hair after they dye it - it takes a few days to look more natural.

Anyway - I appreciate your story and your respectful treatment of the issue.
post #34820 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

Tweed and flannel for the last day of winter...

The shirt doesn't look it, but is actually ivory.






Brown jacket with green trousers! (Click to show)






Jacket: Bespoke Steed
Shirt: Proper Cloth
Tie: Drake's
Square: Put This On
Trousers: Bespoke Hemrajani
Shoes: Edward Green

Great use of an ivory shirt! Much more versatile than many people seem to think.
post #34821 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by rajesh06 View Post

Anyway - Here is a more recent purchase with decidely less padding and a more natural shoulder.
I would be interested in your thoughts and those of others. (I realize that the pants are too long.)
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

This looks much better, perfectly fine for your build. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post


Indeed, it's an interesting thing I would love to do a roaring business in dress uniforms here but sadly it seems to be no longer in the DNA of the American military. My alma mater on the Row has a military dept ran by a former British army Captain.

Where do most US officers have their dress uniforms made? I've heard some have it done by custom tailors in Korea. But where do you get your first uniform before you're commissioned and stationed elsewhere?

 

I understand senior (and wealthy) British officers go to tailors, but are there cheaper options?

post #34822 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

 

@upr_crust and @Andy57 : "Gamesmanship" originated as the title of a very witty small book by George Mikes ( pron. "mickesh", an Hungarian emigré who became more British than the British, a little like Jerome K Jerome before him). Specifically, gamesmanship is the precise opposite of sportsmanship; but in a very subtle way. It's a great read.

 

I read that book almost forty years ago and had lost the reference. Thanks for the reminder--the memory brought a smile. His first book, How To Be An Alien is, I think, superior, funnier, and an even better insight into the English way of looking at the world.

post #34823 of 43842
It could be a personal subconscious voice due to centuries of Anglo/American influence on the suit, but I'm pretty sure that everyone views structured suits with business. The voice could be subtle or distinct, but it is undeniably there.

That said, I think the differing styles can and are done well here. Andy perfectly embodies the fine British traditions, AAS and Roycru rock the American Trad look, and so on. Extended/round shoulders, drape or no drape, cuffs or no cuffs, closed or open quarters, all play a role in defining styles (and could be unflattering if exaggerated) but personally I like the variety. We can only do so much tailoring trickery to offset head sizes and waist lines.

Most find what style they feel comfortable in, focus first on fit, and then refine their ability to play with fabrics, colors and patterns, and where the last three fall on the business/casual spectrum.
post #34824 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Nice Retro Phone

post #34825 of 43842

post #34826 of 43842

I think we all agree that totally unstructured tailoring gives much more casual vibe than its opposite. However, I think that one can create a great formalwear with soft shoulders if other factors (e.g. fabric, detailing, proportions, etc.) are kept on formal side of spectrum. Personally, I tend to associate structure more with seasons than formality. I would have a hard time wearing summer suit with strong shoulder construction, while I have no problem with this when it comes to winter tweeds. It's no coincidence, that Italian tailoring usually promotes natural shoulder lines in opposition to traditional English style where structure is ubiquitous. Just my two grosze :) 

 

 

Today. Definitely the most structured jacket I own.

 

9c717525d073f3e55e7e073806a2c917.jpg

Details (Click to show)
* flatcap by Miler Menswear
* tweed jacket by Brook Taverner
* waistcoat from Suitsupply
* tie by Jacques Britt
* shirt from Osovski
* cords by Dockers
 
e424f625ab3ba81567696b07530a59b1.jpg
 
7ac0fadd2d0b976c532d9ef43ee4fb3b.jpg
 
ce4284b8ee2ba9435de6d646ec7a56e6.jpg
post #34827 of 43842
^ I think this would be a look that demands a more edgy, cutaway type collar. Looks too restrained for the shirt fabric and contrast collar. Also, I could do without the shirt entirely...too bubblegummy for me.

Andy, while I for the most part LOVE your looks, I think your jackets come off as too long to my eye, especially with the double breasted choices. Would prefer a touch shorter.
post #34828 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post
 

 

Where do most US officers have their dress uniforms made? I've heard some have it done by custom tailors in Korea. But where do you get your first uniform before you're commissioned and stationed elsewhere?

 

The custom made dress uniform is very uncommon in the U.S. That isn't to say that it doesn't happen, but most buy RTW garments from large distributers mirroring the general American tendencies toward suits. The basic dress uniform (previously the Class A, now Dress Blues) are issued upon induction. Mess Dress is optional at the Soldier's expense, though some units require officers to obtain this. Lower enlisted are generally not required to buy non-issued uniforms, although Mess Dress is always optional and somewhat more expected among higher enlisted.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanComposition View Post

It could be a personal subconscious voice due to centuries of Anglo/American influence on the suit, but I'm pretty sure that everyone views structured suits with business. The voice could be subtle or distinct, but it is undeniably there.

 

I think this is certainly true when it comes to the perceptions of most Americans but I'm not sure that it is entirely justified. I should think that certain body types can look just as business appropriate in lightly structured suits as others would look in highly structured ones.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by blekit View Post
 

I think we all agree that totally unstructured tailoring gives much more casual vibe than its opposite. However, I think that one can create a great formalwear with soft shoulders if other factors (e.g. fabric, detailing, proportions, etc.) are kept on formal side of spectrum. Personally, I tend to associate structure more with seasons than formality. I would have a hard time wearing summer suit with strong shoulder construction, while I have no problem with this when it comes to winter tweeds. It's no coincidence, that Italian tailoring usually promotes natural shoulder lines in opposition to traditional English style where structure is ubiquitous. Just my two grosze :) 

 

That's interesting, and I was debating about whether to throw the casual summer suit option into the mix of the discussion earlier. I tend to think that in the U.S. casual suits are somewhat of a rarity, the general association being that you wear a suit for work not for play. Of course we all know things aren't so black and white, but that is my impression of the general public's stance. I do think your associating with seasonality is interesting and I think I get where it is coming from, but I personally wouldn't quite go that far because I have seen unstructured winter suits that look really nice as well. So in this case I can see why a summer suit might be better with less structure in terms of coolness, but on the other hand it's common for winter stuff too.

post #34829 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericgereghty View Post

Andy, while I for the most part LOVE your looks, I think your jackets come off as too long to my eye, especially with the double breasted choices. Would prefer a touch shorter.

 

Thanks. I think my jackets have crept longer recently.

 

I can't stand the thought of a too-short jacket. I don't want any part of the crotch of my trousers visible below the hem of my jacket. I have emphasized this to both tailors I use and they may have taken it too much to heart. But, having said that, I'm happy with the look. I am trying to create as long a line as I can through my body, within the limited resources that nature gave me to work with. Perhaps I'm going about it the wrong way.

post #34830 of 43842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy57 View Post

Thanks. I think my jackets have crept longer recently.

I can't stand the thought of a too-short jacket. I don't want any part of the crotch of my trousers visible below the hem of my jacket. I have emphasized this to both tailors I use and they may have taken it too much to heart. But, having said that, I'm happy with the look. I am trying to create as long a line as I can through my body, within the limited resources that nature gave me to work with. Perhaps I'm going about it the wrong way.

Definitely do not take me as the authority on what's "right," as many here may see things differently.

I totally understand what you mean about absolutely not wanting a too short jacket. I have some of those in my closet, and, as much as I like them in all other facets, the length, or lack thereof, leaves them rarely worn.

From my vantage, I would say there's probably a middle ground between too short and what you're currently opting for, though what you're currently going for is undeniably a far better choice than too short.
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