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I want to reproduce a book's illustrations to use as art for my walls. Legal? - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbie View Post
My friend and I were going to make t-shirts w/ an old mickey mouse dressed in hitler youth garb.

And did you? I've studied the HJ a lot; the organization is fascinating from a sociological perspective. (But I wouldn't buy the shirt. )
post #17 of 27
I tried to do this once with a WWII newspaper I own. Kinko's absolutely refused to do it, so if you're planning to go there, scanning the document first is probably a good idea.
post #18 of 27
I don't think a publisher would care--or would even know. But why not try and get in touch with the illustrator directly? A lot of artists are more than happy to sell the original or a high-quality print. It saves you some of the headache, insures a good quality reproduction, and supports the artist directly.
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Because he is reclusive and Italian.
post #20 of 27
I always had the impression he was dead already.
post #21 of 27
If you do go through with this... please post pictures! I'm interested in seeing how it turns out.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbie View Post
copyrights run out eventually. That is why there have been so many incarnations of mickey mouse. My friend and I were going to make t-shirts w/ an old mickey mouse dressed in hitler youth garb.

I think you placing these pictures on your wall should be of no consequence.

robbie

Actually, Mickey Mouse is part of the reason the US copyright timeframe has risen to a ridiculous 95 years - every time Mickey gets near being released into the public domain, Disney spends millions of dollars lobbying for further extensions to the copyright term - raising it to 75 years in 1976, then 95 in 1998. I predict that in 2018 there will be another raise to 115 years.

You can produce parody images under fair use provisions of the law, but if the image gets too popular, be prepared to defend it in court - you may win, but it's a lot of money to spend on defending a joke t-shirt.

However, if it's just you and some friends making a t-shirt to wear around town you'll probably get away with it.

The original poster should be fine with duplicating an image for personal, non-commercial use (again, fair use) - although I have heard of incidents where people have been turned away from photo labs for having images that look "too professional" or attempting to copy commercial images without documents proving they have permission to duplicate them.

OP won't get his door kicked in for copying out of old books, but he may have to try a couple of outlets to find one who'll copy the image for him.
post #23 of 27
Dusty--it's tough to copy or scan pages from books, without getting that annoying shadow on the bound edge. Are you thinking of slicing them out??
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
I tried to do this once with a WWII newspaper I own. Kinko's absolutely refused to do it, so if you're planning to go there, scanning the document first is probably a good idea.

Same here: I had a postcard with a George Tooker print, and Kinko's in Toronto said that they wouldn't print an enlarged version for me, but that I could do it myself on one of the self-service photocopiers.
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rubylith View Post
Dusty--it's tough to copy or scan pages from books, without getting that annoying shadow on the bound edge. Are you thinking of slicing them out??

No, I couldn't do that to a rare book. I'll just have to get around it somehow.
post #26 of 27
Rasterbations not a crime if no one catches you.
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by v0rtex View Post
Actually, Mickey Mouse is part of the reason the US copyright timeframe has risen to a ridiculous 95 years - every time Mickey gets near being released into the public domain, Disney spends millions of dollars lobbying for further extensions to the copyright term - raising it to 75 years in 1976, then 95 in 1998. I predict that in 2018 there will be another raise to 115 years.

You can produce parody images under fair use provisions of the law, but if the image gets too popular, be prepared to defend it in court - you may win, but it's a lot of money to spend on defending a joke t-shirt.

However, if it's just you and some friends making a t-shirt to wear around town you'll probably get away with it.

The original poster should be fine with duplicating an image for personal, non-commercial use (again, fair use) - although I have heard of incidents where people have been turned away from photo labs for having images that look "too professional" or attempting to copy commercial images without documents proving they have permission to duplicate them.

OP won't get his door kicked in for copying out of old books, but he may have to try a couple of outlets to find one who'll copy the image for him.

+1, my seminar paper in law school was written regarding the evil duo if Disney & Sonny Bono (entitled something stupid along the lines of "2018, The Year the Rodent?")

The perverse thing is that many of Disney's early films were released literally within a year of the copyright expiring on the book the film was based upon - e.g. The Jungle Book.
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