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Scotch drinkers - Page 5

post #61 of 81
Thread Starter 
I am glad I started this post I learned more here than articles in magazines I purchased to read up on the subject of scotch. Thank you in particular Huntsman. On my next visit I'm going to look for something with more substance. As for the chocolate accompanying it, I'll try dark chocolate truffles or something in that vain. Instead of the elaborate procedure proposed in the magazine
post #62 of 81
Am glad you posted it too -- I learned alot myself, especially enjoying the questions I hadn't thought of. Gotta love it. JFK -- thanks for the reply, and congrats on the personal milestones. All life is sweet, but those moments are the sweetest. Kalra -- Well, your fair city is tied for my number one on the list of places I want to go in the world, so when I get there, I'll check your scotch establishment. Regards, gentlemen, Huntsman
post #63 of 81
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Am glad you posted it too -- I learned alot myself, especially enjoying the questions I hadn't thought of. Gotta love it.
Likewise, I'm sure; and to answer your rhetorical question from way up in the thread, Huntsman: yes, it's easy to tell you like your scotch.
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JFK -- thanks for the reply, and congrats on the personal milestones. All life is sweet, but those moments are the sweetest.
You're welcome, and you're right.
post #64 of 81
Just thought I would chime in (after a long absence from the board). IMHO, Oban is a great "starter" scotch for those looking to break into the single malts. My personal favorites (including blends) are Macallan 18 (the 25 and 30 are a bit strong and the 60 is $35,000 - out of my price range), Lagavullin, JW Blue, the newly released (at least in the states) JW Green, and Laphroig (with 2 ice cubes). I find that 2 small cubes provides just enough water to release the peat flavors, without ruining the temperature. I enjoy my single malts in a single malt tasting glass, although a brandy bubble will do just fine. Lately, I have been enjoying tequillas and armanac (cognac's lesser known cousin). Just giving my pallet (and wallet) a break.
post #65 of 81
Welcome back GQL. Bradford
post #66 of 81
I got some compass box hedonism today to check it out, it seems really smooth and the flavors are quite a bit different, it seems quite a bit different than blue label but perhaps equally smooth, I will have to do some more comparisons. What do you guys who have tried both think?
post #67 of 81
I really like Hedonism; it's one of my favorite whiskies overall, and definitely my favorite blended scotch (although, in all fairness, I've never actually bought a bottle of blue label, so my experience of it is considerably less than my experience of the Hedonism, of which I've enjoyed several bottles). It's sweet and smooth, and has a very distinctive flavor (no doubt due to the lack of malt in the blend); it makes a great summertime drink with a splash of soda over ice, and it's great straight up, too. John Glaser (who started Compass Box) told me once that he likes to drink it out of an Iittala "Stella" juice glass (in front, with liquid): I prefer the Riedel "Vinum" Single Malt glass if I'm drinking it neat; this glass really accentuates the sweet notes of the scotch: Does anyone else have a favorite scotch-drinking glass?
post #68 of 81
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I prefer the Riedel "Vinum" Single Malt glass if I'm drinking it neat; this glass really accentuates the sweet notes of the scotch: Does anyone else have a favorite scotch-drinking glass?
That's mine, right there.
post #69 of 81
So far my collection consists of: Johnnie Black Johnnie Gold Hedonism Highland Park 12 yr Macallan 12 yr I was thinking about trying an Islay and people had recommended Tallisker as it was the mildest of these, is that a good idea?
post #70 of 81
Nice collection so far. Actually, Talisker is probably one of the most overpowering of the island malts (btw: it's distilled on Skye, not Islay); it's very pungent, heavy on the seaweed/brine/iodine, and has a peppery afterburn that'll make the sweat bead up on your forehead. I wouldn't necessarily recommend it as anyone's first experience of the island style, although many people love it. A better choice, IMO - though still a big whiskey - is Lagavulin. The 16-year-old is superb; it's very complex, the flavors evolve over time, though it's got a strong peat-smoke character to it all the way through, with just a hint of the seaweed/briny/iodine flavor that I find a bit overpowering in the Talisker.
post #71 of 81
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Does anyone else have a favorite scotch-drinking glass?
I also like the Riedel glass, although I don't have a full set yet. Sometimes, I get by with a plain old rocks glass.
post #72 of 81
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A better choice, IMO - though still a big whiskey - is Lagavulin. The 16-year-old is superb; it's very complex, the flavors evolve over time, though it's got a strong peat-smoke character to it all the way through, with just a hint of the seaweed/briny/iodine flavor that I find a bit overpowering in the Talisker.
I just picked up a bottle of this (in fact, I'm having a bit of it in my Riedel right now). It's good stuff, but to tell you the truth, I think that I like Laphroaig and Ardbeg better. Of course, I like that seaweedy flavor...
post #73 of 81
Yah, Talisker is a weird scotch. Definitely not a "starter" Islay at all, as JFK pointed out, it's a Skye. I didn't really note the pepper, but hey. For a smaller Islay, consider a Bowmore, and though I wouldn't contradict Lagavulin, I'd say Laphroaig might be a little much right away. Favorite Malt glass is a Sommeliers Reidel, for on the rocks I have a vintage tumbler that is made of 'cracked' glass (if you know what I mean) with a cut glass rim that I adore as much as the Reidel. Sometimes it's just 'what you like' more than 'what's best.' Regards, Huntsman
post #74 of 81
That Riedel is beautiful. I have a number of their wine glasses, but hadn't seen their scotch ones...wow. note: It is Riedel, not Reidel: Riedel Webpage
post #75 of 81
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(JFK @ 31 Aug. 2004, 9:26) A better choice, IMO - though still a big whiskey - is Lagavulin. The 16-year-old is superb; it's very complex, the flavors evolve over time, though it's got a strong peat-smoke character to it all the way through, with just a hint of the seaweed/briny/iodine flavor that I find a bit overpowering in the Talisker.
I just picked up a bottle of this (in fact, I'm having a bit of it in my Riedel right now). It's good stuff, but to tell you the truth, I think that I like Laphroaig and Ardbeg better. Of course, I like that seaweedy flavor...
Ardbeg is awesome stuff.
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