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post #46 of 81
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Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
I think Cutty Sark is known as one of the blends with the highest grain (wheat) to malt proportion. Virtually all Canadian whiskies are made exclusively from Rye.
post #47 of 81
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Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
I believe, Kalra, but can't swear to it, that the grain whiskys are run by the distiller, i.e, Johnnie Walker runs the grain whiskys they use in their house blends, and possibly sells them to other blenders as well.  Since that continuous-column method is so easy, that makes sense, and I doubt if any of those grain whiskys would be marketed alone -- they are designed to be realtively neutral in character, as they are essentially a dilutant. If anyone else can offer insight into this, I'd be interested to hear as well. I'll also look into it myself, as my curiosity as been aroused. Regards, Huntsman
post #48 of 81
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Originally Posted by kalra2411,22 July 2004, 1:38
Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
I think Cutty Sark is known as one of the blends with the highest grain (wheat) to malt proportion. Virtually all Canadian whiskies are made exclusively from Rye.
Thank you for the help, but I meant Scottish ones, I was aware that allmost (if not all) non Scottish whiskys were not malt. EDIT: I have never heard of Cutty Sark, is that scottish?
post #49 of 81
Again I have made an error, upon further research, I have found that Green Label is a 'vatted whiskys' and not a single malt, sorry guys.
post #50 of 81
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(VersaceMan @ 22 July 2004, 7:31) Speaking of Johnny Walker... I was at the (large) liquor department of my local supermarket, and I checked out whiskeys - they had quite a nice selection, including many of the brands talked about on the forum.  Their cap, however, was around $60.  They had many in the $25-50 range, though. Anyway, I know as far as Johnny Walker, red label is the lowest and black is the highest.  I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter.  Not much of a price difference.  Is this the way it's supposed to be?
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Anyway, I know as far as Johnny Walker, red label is the lowest and black is the highest.  I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter.  Not much of a price difference.  Is this the way it's supposed to be?
No no no. Blue Label is the highest, it is about 150 pounds per bottle, so that is around $270 per bottle, then comes Gold Label, which (and the price varies a lot) is 70 (can be up to 100 in some places, and as low as 40) pounds per bottle, about $126. Then there is Green Label, the only single malt by Johnny Walker, it is around 60 pounds per bottle (again there is a similar situation for Green and Gold when it comes to price). Then comes Black and Red, though there are others aswell, Premier, Swing, Superior Swing, Oldest (a type of Blue Label), and the Centurion Blend (a type of Gold Label)
Ok, thanks. For some reason, I thought someone mentioned that black label was the top.
post #51 of 81
There's another neat seldom-seen (at least in the US) Johnny Walker blend called "Swing". I think it's a 20 year old. It's noted for its bottle that can swing back and forth without toppling over.
post #52 of 81
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There's another neat seldom-seen (at least in the US) Johnny Walker blend called "Swing".  I think it's a 20 year old.   It's noted for its bottle that can swing back and forth without toppling over.
I drink Swing and Superior Swing quite often.
post #53 of 81
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Originally Posted by arenn1,21 July 2004, 4:56
I am a huge fan of scotch. Let me suggest that the best "entry level" Scotch is Aberlour 10-year, which can generally be purchased for under $30 a bottle. The best "premium" scotch I know is not a scotch at all, but an Irish whisky called Midleton Very Rare. It's the flagship brand of the Jameson distiller.
Aberlour is entry-level, true, but he's already drinking Glenfiddich, which is similar in character, so I'd suggest at least a change. Again, I'm compelled to agree with Kalra, it's notes are very subtle. The reason you like both Aberlour and find that your favorite UK whisky is an Irish is this: Aberlour is very, very low in the peat department. Irish whiskys have no peat whatever. So they are similar, but less typical of a standard scotch, especially a single malt. Regards, Huntsman
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The reason you like both Aberlour and find that your favorite UK whisky is an Irish is this: Aberlour is very, very low in the peat department. Irish whiskys have no peat whatever. So they are similar, but less typical of a standard scotch, especially a single malt.
I can appreciate both. I like the Laphroaig as well Alas, scotch is yet another expensive habit I've acquired.
post #54 of 81
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Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
John Glaser, who used to work for "a very large whiskey company" (which he does not further identify) started a company called Compass Box (http://www.compassboxwhisky.com/) several years ago to make his own blended whiskies. He makes the most amazing blend entirely from grain whiskies; it's called "Hedonism", and, at under US $100 a bottle, it's a bargain. I highly recommend it. As to single malts, I favor the Lagavulin 16-year-old (the quintessential Islay malt, in my opinion) and the MacAllan 12 or 15-year-old (for the Speyside experience), but my current favorite (of what's in my cupboard right now) is the Highland Park Bicentenary Distiller's Reserve; an amazing 21-year-old distilled in 1977 (and, actually, I'd say Highland Park is my favorite distillery so far). And yes, Cognac is a very natural choice as a compliment to a taste for single malt scotch; my favorites so far have been a Pierre Ferrand (the 1962 "Memoires"; simply stunning) and a Maison Surrenne (an Unblended Grand Champagne designated as Lot 1946/137, which was distilled in 1946 and lay undiscovered in one of the house's cellars until 1997; this was the most amazingly complex spirit I've ever tasted, bar none). For everyday cognacs, I like the Ferrand "Selection des Anges" and the Maison Surrenne Legacy XO. By the way, there's another connection between scotch and cognac: as distilled spirits age in the cask, over the course of the years, a certain percentage evaporates; distillers in Scotland refer to the whiskey lost in this manner as "the Angel's Share" - distillers in Cognac refer to it as "Selection des Anges". I'm not sure if the term originated in both places independently, or if it started in one place and migrated to the other. (Boy, I do go on... ) Before I shut up, "whiskey" (or "whisky" or even "whiskie") is the English corruption of the gaelic "usquebaugh", which translates roughly as "water of life" (the same as "vodka", "aquavit", and "eau-de-vie"). Cheers. (edited to include this answer to the original question...) I've never tried the method described, but I'm very fond of eating chocolate while drinking single malt (not simultaneously, though, I'll have a bit of chocolate, and then a sip of whisky; it's a fantastic combination when you pair the right chocolate with the right whisky. For instance, if I'm drinking the Hedonism blend I mentioned above, Godiva dark chocolate is the perfect complement; of course, you'll have to experiment to find what works for your palate).
post #55 of 81
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Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
Did some checking. Apparently there are grain whisky distilleries. Further, I was wrong in considering them merely an additive, as some of them seem to be made for drinking rather. This link shows the products made by Diego Plc, who own Johnnie Walker and many other distilleries. There are several grain whiskys amongst their products. Diego Products Also, if you go to the website of Berry Bros & Rudd, (superb site and a favorite of mine) the oldest liquor and wine merchant in the UK, you can get grain whisky, in fact, one of the ones listed in the above, Cameron Brig: Cameron Brig at BBR By the way, BBR created Cutty Sark blended whisky, Kalra, and it is one of the world's best-selling scotches. I use it to mix -- it sure is better to me than Dewar's. Admittedly, it has a bigger following on my side of the Atlantic than yours... Regards, Huntsman
post #56 of 81
Very interesting about the Hedonism grain whisky, JFK. I read about it at the website and am intrigued. I'm a bit confused though, can it rightly be called scotch with no malt whatever...? Still, I must try it. Highland Park is certainly very well regarded, though it didn't hit me right when I tried it (merely the standard example). Maybe I was having a bad day. I never mind re-sampling a scotch . And my, you are certainly leagues above me in the Cognac department. Those are some sweet examples you speak of. In Sherry, they also speak of the Angel's Share, btw... Happy tasting, with regards, Huntsman
post #57 of 81
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(kalra2411 @ 22 July 2004, 1:38) Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
Did some checking. Apparently there are grain whisky distilleries. Further, I was wrong in considering them merely an additive, as some of them seem to be made for drinking rather. This link shows the products made by Diego Plc, who own Johnnie Walker and many other distilleries. There are several grain whiskys amongst their products. Diego Products Also, if you go to the website of Berry Bros & Rudd, (superb site and a favorite of mine) the oldest liquor and wine merchant in the UK, you can get grain whisky, in fact, one of the ones listed in the above, Cameron Brig: Cameron Brig at BBR By the way, BBR created Cutty Sark blended whisky, Kalra, and it is one of the world's best-selling scotches. I use it to mix -- it sure is better to me than Dewar's. Admittedly, it has a bigger following on my side of the Atlantic than yours... Regards, Huntsman
Thank you very much Huntsman.
post #58 of 81
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Also, if you go to the website of Berry Bros & Rudd, (superb site and a favorite of mine) the oldest liquor and wine merchant in the UK, you can get grain whisky, in fact, one of the ones listed in the above, Cameron Brig:
Their shop is just nearby to me, it is very good for wine, but there are better places for rare whiskys. The best shop I have been to for scotch is the one in the Metropolitan Hotel (Old Park Lane, the hotel with the Met Bar and Nobu in it), I do not know the name of the shop, but the selection there just blows my mind.
post #59 of 81
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Very interesting about the Hedonism grain whisky, JFK. I read about it at the website and am intrigued. I'm a bit confused though, can it rightly be called scotch with no malt whatever...? Still, I must try it.
It's my understanding that in order to be called "Scotch", a whiskey must be made in Scotland (for instance, Suntory malt whiskey - even though it is in many people's opinion a very fine malt - cannot be called "Scotch" because it's made in Japan). As far as I know, as long as a spirit meets those two criteria (that it's a whiskey, and that it's made in Scotland), it may be called "Scotch". I'm no expert, though, and could very well be wrong about the second part.
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Highland Park is certainly very well regarded, though it didn't hit me right when I tried it (merely the standard example). Maybe I was having a bad day. I never mind re-sampling a scotch .
I definitely recommend such a resampling; the older Highland Parks (18 years and above) are uniformly excellent whiskies, in my opinion, and well worth revisiting.
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And my, you are certainly leagues above me in the Cognac department. Those are some sweet examples you speak of.
Yes, they were; the Memoires and the Unblended 1946 I mentioned were both special indulgences to celebrate personal milestones, and well worth the extravagance.
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In Sherry, they also speak of the Angel's Share, btw... Happy tasting, with regards, Huntsman
I wasn't aware that the term was more widespread, although I suppose it is an apt analogy in the case of any aged spirit where evaporation takes it toll... Regards, JFK
post #60 of 81
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By the way, BBR created Cutty Sark blended whisky, Kalra, and it is one of the world's best-selling scotches. I use it to mix -- it sure is better to me than Dewar's. Admittedly, it has a bigger following on my side of the Atlantic than yours... Regards, Huntsman
Just checked it out: Cutty Sark was blended with the North American market in mind which is probably why Kalra hadn't heard of it. I too use it to mix and find it perfectly adequate.
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