or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Scotch drinkers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Scotch drinkers - Page 3

post #31 of 81
Quote:
Well, jpierpont, I understand that chocolate and scotch is an excellent combination, but that concoction is to overblown for good scotch -- scotch is a drink of elegance and subtlety. Of course, you may enjoy that combination, but use cheap scotch, Johnnie Walker Red or Dewar's or something like that. Otherwise, it would be like having a mimosa with Dom Perignon. The two primary divisions in scotch are the blended scotches (Johnnie Walker, Ballantine, Ambasssador, Cutty Sark) and Single Malts, which are a product of a single distillery. Now, Blended scotches have a high proportion of grain whiskey blended with the malt whiskey, which dilutes the character. Of the Blended whiskeys, I second Kalra's reccomendation of JW Black Label, and I'll explain the reasons why in a moment. As for single malts, they are the best because they are not diluted and they show the unique character of the ingrediants (especially the water), the house style, and the land in their flavours. The 80-odd Single malt distilleries are generally divided into certain regions, and of them, Highland, Speyside, Lowland, and ISlay are the most common. I drink scotches from all the regions, depending on mood -- their is a whiskey for nearly all moods -- but Highland and Speyside whiskeys are my usual drink. They are elegant and gentle. Available favs for me are Macallan (quite common in a decent bar), Cragganmore, and the aforementioned Dalwhinnie. The Islay scotches are the most distinctive of all, having their malt roasted over peat-fed fires, and believe me, the smoke really comes through. Bowmore is a good first if you want to try and Islay, and Laphroig (sp) is a seriously smoky scotch. I also like Talisker, which is a compromise between a Speyside and an Islay -- a little smokey, but has the nice caramelly notes of a Speyside. As for Glenfiddich, yes it is an approachable scotch. But I do find that of all the scotches, Glenfiddich has the most herbal notes -- by herbal I mean it has a nose and flavour of grassy, green things, and is unique in that manner. I personally prefer the richer caramel notes of other scotches. Back to JW Black -- that particular blend has a quite low proportion of diluting grain whiskey, and most of the malt whiskey in it is from Highland and Speyside, so it is my standard indulgence. Best way (generally agreed) to drink scotch is at ambient temp, or slightly chilled, with water added up to 20% the volume of the scotch. Some like soda, or scotch on the rocks. I do rocks sometimes, but most often just drop one in my scotch -- it cools it a little and dilutes it just right for me. Oh, and if you need a dessert-y scotch drink, do, do, do have a rusty nail as Kalra mentioned. it's 1:1 or 1:1.5 ration of scotch to Drambuie, Drambuie being a sweet scotch liquor. Oh, and Kalra, a 'dram' is a unit of measure... I've also heard that scotch, neat, with warm chocolate chip cookies has the above-mentioned effect. I don't need that assistance, so I haven't tried it. I might be impelled to try a square of Lindt bittersweet chocolate with scotch, but usually pair it with an assertive Cabernet or Port. Regards, Huntsman (can you tell that I like my scotch?  ;-) )
Fantastic post. I'm not surprised that someone with a name like Huntsman would have superior taste. I am a relatively new single-malt drinker, and I thought that I'd get started with Glennfiditch. I didn't understand what all the fuss was, until a friend of mine suggested Craggenmore, and later Talisker. I'm working my way up to Laphroaig. I still put a single ice cube (of a decent size) in my drink, an act I don't see replicated by my more discriminating friends, who prefer their dram neat, but as I stated earlier, I am but a novice.
post #32 of 81
Quote:
Quote:
(Huntsman @ 21 July 2004, 3:05) Well, jpierpont, I understand that chocolate and scotch is an excellent combination, but that concoction is to overblown for good scotch -- scotch is a drink of elegance and subtlety. Of course, you may enjoy that combination, but use cheap scotch, Johnnie Walker Red or Dewar's or something like that. Otherwise, it would be like having a mimosa with Dom Perignon. The two primary divisions in scotch are the blended scotches (Johnnie Walker, Ballantine, Ambasssador, Cutty Sark) and Single Malts, which are a product of a single distillery. Now, Blended scotches have a high proportion of grain whiskey blended with the malt whiskey, which dilutes the character. Of the Blended whiskeys, I second Kalra's reccomendation of JW Black Label, and I'll explain the reasons why in a moment. As for single malts, they are the best because they are not diluted and they show the unique character of the ingrediants (especially the water), the house style, and the land in their flavours. The 80-odd Single malt distilleries are generally divided into certain regions, and of them, Highland, Speyside, Lowland, and ISlay are the most common. I drink scotches from all the regions, depending on mood -- their is a whiskey for nearly all moods -- but Highland and Speyside whiskeys are my usual drink. They are elegant and gentle. Available favs for me are Macallan (quite common in a decent bar), Cragganmore, and the aforementioned Dalwhinnie. The Islay scotches are the most distinctive of all, having their malt roasted over peat-fed fires, and believe me, the smoke really comes through. Bowmore is a good first if you want to try and Islay, and Laphroig (sp) is a seriously smoky scotch. I also like Talisker, which is a compromise between a Speyside and an Islay -- a little smokey, but has the nice caramelly notes of a Speyside. As for Glenfiddich, yes it is an approachable scotch. But I do find that of all the scotches, Glenfiddich has the most herbal notes -- by herbal I mean it has a nose and flavour of grassy, green things, and is unique in that manner. I personally prefer the richer caramel notes of other scotches. Back to JW Black -- that particular blend has a quite low proportion of diluting grain whiskey, and most of the malt whiskey in it is from Highland and Speyside, so it is my standard indulgence. Best way (generally agreed) to drink scotch is at ambient temp, or slightly chilled, with water added up to 20% the volume of the scotch. Some like soda, or scotch on the rocks. I do rocks sometimes, but most often just drop one in my scotch -- it cools it a little and dilutes it just right for me. Oh, and if you need a dessert-y scotch drink, do, do, do have a rusty nail as Kalra mentioned. it's 1:1 or 1:1.5 ration of scotch to Drambuie, Drambuie being a sweet scotch liquor. Oh, and Kalra, a 'dram' is a unit of measure... I've also heard that scotch, neat, with warm chocolate chip cookies has the above-mentioned effect. I don't need that assistance, so I haven't tried it. I might be impelled to try a square of Lindt bittersweet chocolate with scotch, but usually pair it with an assertive Cabernet or Port. Regards, Huntsman (can you tell that I like my scotch?  ;-) )
Fantastic post.  I'm not surprised that someone with a name like Huntsman would have superior taste. I am a relatively new single-malt drinker, and I thought that I'd get started with Glennfiditch.  I didn't understand what all the fuss was, until a friend of mine suggested Craggenmore, and later Talisker.  I'm working my way up to Laphroaig.   I still put a single ice cube (of a decent size) in my drink, an act I don't see replicated by my more discriminating friends, who prefer their dram neat, but as I stated earlier, I am but a novice.
Yes, I too must also connote that post, by Huntsman - very informative.
post #33 of 81
As a novice scotch drinker, I'm still working my way up through the blended varieties to start.  I'm a fan of JW black label for certain, but my favorite has been Chivas Regal. I find it to have some almond notes compared to a slight smoky flavor in the JW.  Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
post #34 of 81
Quote:
As a novice scotch drinker, I'm still working my way up through the blended varieties to start.  I'm a fan of JW black label for certain, but my favorite has been Chivas Regal. I find it to have some almond notes compared to a slight smoky flavor in the JW.  Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
Let me tell you one thing to start, you have a very professional tongue for Scotch already, Black Label and Chivas Regal. As I had previously said though, the idea that malt is always better than a blend is very wrong - only the more expensive malts are (so to say) better. I realise that that was not a direct response to your question, so in direct response; a malt tastes much purer, which, can be both a good and bad thing, that is why blending is done - in order to refine the taste of malts which are either too harsh on the finish or the notes. Now, when blending is done in order to tone down the notes, this is usually a bad thing - thus explaining why Cardhu has much more defined, albeit, similar notes to Black Label (Black Label contains Cardhu). (However, please note that in my opinion, Black Label is the epitome of a perfect Whisky for the price, and though I just brought up a negative point about it, when you consider the minimal price tag, it is more than excusable) But when refining the finish, as is done with Blue Label and Gold Label, you end up with something which is better than the original Malts, as the thing with malts is than no human intervention is possible (now I just realised I am trailing off again, sorry, but I will keep going, as I think it will be helpful to you as well) in order to refine the taste. So yes, a lot of the flavor is a result of blending, and combining malts does lead to some interesting new flavors, which you do not experience in any of the individual malts. (Hope I managed to answer your question, and not just give irrelevant information)
post #35 of 81
Quote:
As a novice scotch drinker, I'm still working my way up through the blended varieties to start.  I'm a fan of JW black label for certain, but my favorite has been Chivas Regal. I find it to have some almond notes compared to a slight smoky flavor in the JW.  Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
I got a bit confused in my reply to you, you do realise that a blend is a blend of malts?
post #36 of 81
Speaking of Johnny Walker... I was at the (large) liquor department of my local supermarket, and I checked out whiskeys - they had quite a nice selection, including many of the brands talked about on the forum. Their cap, however, was around $60. They had many in the $25-50 range, though. Anyway, I know as far as Johnny Walker, red label is the lowest and black is the highest. I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter. Not much of a price difference. Is this the way it's supposed to be?
post #37 of 81
Quote:
Speaking of Johnny Walker... I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter.  Not much of a price difference.  Is this the way it's supposed to be?
That's sounds about right. If you ever get the chance, I would urge everyone to attend a Johnny Walker tasting which they do throughout the major metropolitan areas of the U.S. I went to one a few years ago, before I quit drinking. It was a completely free event, that started with an hour long cocktail party where you could order straight Black Label or any mixed drink made with whiskey. Then, one of the Johnny Walker Ambassadors, dressed in a kilt nontheless, taught us about the history, brewing methods and ingredients of whiskey. They did a video presentation about each of the different distilleries where the single malts that make up Black Label are made and you had 5 shot glasses in front of you of which 4 were filled with the single malts and the 5th was the final product (Black Label). After, we hung out at the hotel bar for a while and the Johnny Walker representative bought us all drinks and told stories about Scotland (and other things) for a few hours. I walked away with a small bottle of Black Label and a much greater appreciation of scotch. Bradford
post #38 of 81
Quote:
Fantastic post.  I'm not surprised that someone with a name like Huntsman would have superior taste.
Well, thanks for the compliment, but I wouldn't say my taste is any more superior than anyone else's -- I merely know what I like, and try to know it well.
Quote:
I still put a single ice cube (of a decent size) in my drink, an act I don't see replicated by my more discriminating friends, who prefer their dram neat, but as I stated earlier, I am but a novice.
I do that (though my cube is of modest size), and I like it. Do, and drink, what you like -- within reason of course, i.e., those Dom mimosas. Regards, Huntsman
post #39 of 81
Quote:
Speaking of Johnny Walker... I was at the (large) liquor department of my local supermarket, and I checked out whiskeys - they had quite a nice selection, including many of the brands talked about on the forum.  Their cap, however, was around $60.  They had many in the $25-50 range, though. Anyway, I know as far as Johnny Walker, red label is the lowest and black is the highest.  I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter.  Not much of a price difference.  Is this the way it's supposed to be?
Quote:
Anyway, I know as far as Johnny Walker, red label is the lowest and black is the highest. I was very surprised to find that red label was $22.50/liter, and black was $29/liter. Not much of a price difference. Is this the way it's supposed to be?
No no no. Blue Label is the highest, it is about 150 pounds per bottle, so that is around $270 per bottle, then comes Gold Label, which (and the price varies a lot) is 70 (can be up to 100 in some places, and as low as 40) pounds per bottle, about $126. Then there is Green Label, the only single malt by Johnny Walker, it is around 60 pounds per bottle (again there is a similar situation for Green and Gold when it comes to price). Then comes Black and Red, though there are others aswell, Premier, Swing, Superior Swing, Oldest (a type of Blue Label), and the Centurion Blend (a type of Gold Label)
post #40 of 81
Quote:
Quote:
(kalra2411 @ 22 July 2004, 11:27)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin,22 July 2004, 6:52
As a novice scotch drinker, I'm still working my way up through the blended varieties to start.  I'm a fan of JW black label for certain, but my favorite has been Chivas Regal. I find it to have some almond notes compared to a slight smoky flavor in the JW.  Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
I got a bit confused in my reply to you, you do realise that a blend is a blend of malts?
Thanks for your compliment up a few, Kalra, but I have to disagree with you here. Almost all blends include straight run, continuous-column distilled grain (made of unmalted barley, corn and/or maize) whiskys in combination with a blend of various double pot distilled malt whiskys. This practice came into vogue around Victorian times because pure malt whiskys were deemed too strong for English tastes. Teachers, JW Red, Ballantine, Cutty Sark , J&B, White and Mackay, Chivas, Grouse, and even JW Black are in this category. Therefore, blends are not simply a blend of malts -- they are a blend of malts and grain whiskys, which is not a trival distinction, because the grain whiskys dilute the malt. JW Black and Teacher's, I believe, are two with higher concentrations of malt whisky in them. Now, I'm not too familiar with them, but JW Blue and/or Gold may be what is known as 'vatted whiskys' which are blends of only malt whiskys, but vatted whiskys are uncommon and are not what is generally referred to when one is speaking of a blended scotch. Regards, Huntsman
post #41 of 81
Quote:
Quote:
Quote (kalra2411 @ 22 July 2004, 11:27)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin,22 July 2004, 6:52
As a novice scotch drinker, I'm still working my way up through the blended varieties to start.  I'm a fan of JW black label for certain, but my favorite has been Chivas Regal. I find it to have some almond notes compared to a slight smoky flavor in the JW.  Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
I got a bit confused in my reply to you, you do realise that a blend is a blend of malts?
Thanks for your compliment up a few, Kalra, but I have to disagree with you here. Almost all blends include straight run, continuous-column distilled grain (made of unmalted barley, corn and/or maize) whiskys in combination with a blend of various double pot distilled malt whiskys. This practice came into vogue around Victorian times because pure malt whiskys were deemed too strong for English tastes. Teachers, JW Red, Ballantine, Cutty Sark , J&B, White and Mackay, Chivas, Grouse, and even JW Black are in this category. Therefore, blends are not simply a blend of malts -- they are a blend of malts and grain whiskys, which is not a trival distinction, because the grain whiskys dilute the malt. JW Black and Teacher's, I believe, are two with higher concentrations of malt whisky in them. Now, I'm not too familiar with them, but JW Blue and/or Gold may be what is known as 'vatted whiskys' which are blends of only malt whiskys, but vatted whiskys are uncommon and are not what is generally referred to when one is speaking of a blended scotch. Regards, Huntsman[/quote] I see, sorry for giving wrong advice.
post #42 of 81
Must be because when people tell you the whiskys in the blend at tasting sessions, they only name the malts. So that is why I had that idea in m head.
post #43 of 81
Quote:
Given that these are blended varieties, how much of the flavor is a result of the blending process versus actual aging?
I'd say that most of the difference in flavor between blended whiskys are a result of the blending, because the grain whisky to malt whisky ratio is very important, as well as the region from which the malts in the blend are from, i.e., whether there are peaty Islays in there or gentler Lowland malts. The blend creates the inital whisky that aging adds to and improves -- but the foundation is still the blend. The longer the aging is, the more time the oak has to work with the scotch, so the more of an effect it can have. Once you get into aging distinctions, a whole different world opens up, because you can have scotches aged in barrels previously used for sherry, Yankee bourbon, and even port. Balvenie and Glenmorangie have various malts aged in different woods if you'd like to see the differences. To reiterate, it's mostly in the blend, for blended whiskys. Regards, Huntsman
post #44 of 81
Quote:
Must be because when people tell you the whiskys in the blend at tasting sessions, they only name the malts. So that is why I had that idea in m head.
Yes, probably -- they really tend to downplay the grain whisky component. I was just looking at JW's website for a moment and I didn't see a thing about the grain whiskys (could have been there though), but it is true all the same. Regards, Huntsman
post #45 of 81
Huntsman in particular, but anyone, what are some grain whiskies (scotch), as I do not really know of any, perhaps if I hear the name I will know, but I don't know of any specifically as grain as opposed to malt.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Scotch drinkers