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Too Much for a Suit? - Page 2

post #16 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
I am thinking that some members of society are in fact MAD. You would have to be, no? To wear a park ranger inspired outfit to a wedding and think it 'smart'? And what goes through the head of someone who chooses brown tweed for a evening function?


On the subway this morning -- I kid you not -- was a man wearing a blue pinstripe suit, a light blue dress shirt and a perfectly dimpled blue necktie -- everything was fine above the ankles, but he was wearing -- get ready for it -- mandals! Yes, black sandals. And he wasn't carrying any bag or anything so highly unlikely that he was intent on changing shoes upon arrival at work. He was a black man - probably in his forties. I was dumfounded.

post #17 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by G79 View Post
Quiet an interesting observation you make Sator. With the dot com boom and dressing down @ work notion spreading like a epidemic across sectors the suits have gone from being indispensible to almost something that is regarded by most as superfluous in ones wardrobe.

And for me it's a good thing, too. Just as I love driving but for the daily trudge to work/school have always and likely will always prefer mass transit/walking/biking, I enjoy wearing nice suits but would probably chafe at being forced to do so daily. So ironically, because of the relaxation of the modern dress code, I dress better.
post #18 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by amerikajinda View Post
On the subway this morning -- I kid you not -- was a man wearing a blue pinstripe suit, a light blue dress shirt and a perfectly dimpled blue necktie -- everything was fine above the ankles, but he was wearing -- get ready for it -- mandals! Yes, black sandals. And he wasn't carrying any bag or anything so highly unlikely that he was intent on changing shoes upon arrival at work. He was a black man - probably in his forties. I was dumfounded.


Last night I saw a gorgeous blue stripe suit and the guy was wearing black reptile skin cowboy boots.
post #19 of 34
In some ways today can be thought as an even better time, when wearing a suit is a statement of personal character and style, and not always a statement of social class and station relative to others. Someone can be a role model for others if that one's desire.
post #20 of 34
Sandals are still very de saison in monasteries and convents!!!
I'm also annoyed by the in your face "I'm soooooooooooo cooooooooool" statement.....
IF YOU REALLY WANT TO BE COMFORTABLE ,DO NOT WEAR A SUIT AND A TIE !!!!!
Bringyour clothes with you and change them before entering the office...
That will be cool!!!!
post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurston View Post
Sator, you make a provocative argument, but the above sentence stands out as quite silly.

Good catch.
post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
I was just having this conversation with my outside salesman, about how I would feel more hesitant dropping $1000+ for a new tv than for a pair of shoes or a new suit, which I would easily do without too much thought.

hehehehe... me too.
post #23 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Get Smart View Post
as much as I lament the piss poor dress codes that monopolize most folks' lives, I don't see any point in drudging about sartorial standards of the past, because those days when men wore a suit and hat to walk down to get the newspaper are gone.

After all, it's preaching to the choir here. Now a thread like this over at amjackassholes.com would probably make for a lively discussion

exactly what i was thinking.
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurston View Post
Sator, you make a provocative argument, but the above sentence stands out as quite silly.

The equivalent would have been a typewriter which probably wasn't regarded as an "essential". Typewriters were quite expensive in those days. Adjusted for inflation, in fact, a typewriter cost the same as a good computer does today.
post #25 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thurston View Post
Sator, you make a provocative argument, but the above sentence stands out as quite silly.
I must say I am rather enjoying the way the sentence in question has caused so much bemusement and discussion. There's no such thing as bad publicity, as they say. So while I could edit it to read something like "a suit was considered as much an essential item for a man, as a computer might be today etc", I shall rather sit back and enjoy the fireworks.
post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
The equivalent would have been a typewriter which probably wasn't regarded as an "essential". Typewriters were quite expensive in those days. Adjusted for inflation, in fact, a typewriter cost the same as a good computer does today.

I guess there was also the cost of a good radio - and if you could afford one, a gramophone. The shellac 48rpm records cost a pretty penny too. Still, there was not the whole cornucopia of electronic devices eg Blackberry, laptop, iPhone, DVD player etc to bid for the precious 'disposable income'.

Oddly enough, I learned to type on a good old typewriter. I don't remember them being quite as expensive as a modern computer though, but I guess the good ones (IIRC the finest German ones) could get expensive - that much I vaguely recall.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sator View Post
I guess there was also the cost of a good radio - and if you could afford one, a gramophone. The shellac 48rpm records cost a pretty penny too. Still, there was not the whole cornucopia of electronic devices eg Blackberry, laptop, iPhone, DVD player etc to bid for the precious 'disposable income'. Oddly enough, I learned to type on a good old typewriter. I don't remember them being quite as expensive as a modern computer though, but I guess the good ones (IIRC the finest German ones) could get expensive - that much I vaguely recall.
Apparently a Remington Noiseless Portable cost $92.50 initially in 1931 which is $1080 in 2006 dollars. The price was lowered to $67.50 in 1935 which is $982.46, again in 2006 dollars. There were also Luxe Models and professional desktop models which probably cost more. Another expensive commodity in those days were cameras which were almost all dominated by the Germans.
post #28 of 34
Wow. I think you'll rarely see so sharply dressed a quartet anymore, even in the hollywood circles.
post #29 of 34
What makes it all the more stylish is how insolent they look.
post #30 of 34
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

Another expensive commodity in those days were cameras which were almost all dominated by the Germans.

I wonder if the average person in the street could afford one back in 1921?
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