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World business section picture of today's nytimes - Page 2

post #16 of 31
i thought the roman company "interno 8" (i believe angelo galasso is the designer) invented a dress shirt called the "polso orological" for agnelli that is specifically designed with a special cuff for wearing the watch on top of the cuff the cuff of the shirt is designed in a such a fashion that it allows the watch to be worn over the cuff without the cuff puckering or creasing underneath ..... it's a really odd but oddly interesting cuff design
post #17 of 31
The mind plays tricks.  But I seem to recall, many years ago, the unbuttoned button-down collar becoming so trendy that Brooks themselves mimicked the look, putting out a dress shirt with an identically-shaped tab collar.  Can anyone confirm this? Re Agnelli's watch.  When I was growing up in the '50's--that is, in my much, much more flamboyant youth--I inherited from my step-grandfather a gaudy wristwatch   It was my first, a gold-plated Bulova with a matching expansion band.  I soon found that gobs of gold look lousy against a pale, skinny teenage wrist.  So what did I do?  I strapped it on outside the sleeve of my sweater.   The outcome?  In the end I had to choose.  Carry a baseball bat to deter the unwanted advances of inflamed males or knuckle under and dress like everybody else.  (I'm afraid I took the easy way out, more's the pity.)   If I'd only known about Agnelli, possibly the most relentlessly heterosexual rake in recent history, maybe I could have stuck it out. . . .  (At least until my taste in timepieces improved.) Am I the only fellow who ever found his sartorial preferences misinterpreted?  "Anybody who dresses as well as you (or likes Eric Satie, or Philip Guston, or Cafe des Artistes, or. . .) must be gay."   Does my experience ring a bell? Mike
post #18 of 31
I guess not? Mike
post #19 of 31
Agnelli had a rare skin reaction to metals - especially those in prolonged contact - such that he had to wear his watch over his sleeve. Many have thought it was a fashion statement of sorts, but it was quite certainly a result of a rare skin disease.
post #20 of 31
there probably aren't that many forumers who grew up in the '50's...for example i grew up in the '80's, when new wave, preppy, punk, and proto-hiphop styles coexisted in a cacophanous melange. also i remember lots of acid-wash jeans. *shudder* that said, i lived in the south, where if you dressed 'gay' you were more likely to get sneered at than propositioned. i remember visiting my old middle school right after i had moved away, and i was wearing a pink buttondown under a navy sweater...some redneck passed me in the hall and audibly snorted. /andrew
post #21 of 31
faustian bargain--Thanks for the response.  I guess the South--even in recent years--is not the best place for ambiguous sartorial signifiers. dorian--Fascinating.  As your Agnelli story reminds us, not everything we wear is a fashion statement.  One of my high school English teachers--a cute little thing from the U. of Washington--had to bandage her wrist in order to wear her gold graduation watch.  (The things one remembers.) Mike
post #22 of 31
in the case of agnelli, i would say he turned his lemons into lemonade. which is to say, he had a choice of ways to solve his particular limitation, and the choice he made is indeed a kind of fashion statement. it's just that our judgment of this statement is now tempered by knowledge of the original impetus. makes it seem less 'affected' and more 'functional', although like i said it's hardly the only path he could have taken. maybe it's the most dashing path though. something we would all benefit from striving for. (dunno how to phrase that without sounding stilted.) /andrew
post #23 of 31
Quote:
faustian bargain--Thanks for the response. I guess the South--even in recent years--is not the best place for ambiguous sartorial signifiers. dorian--Fascinating. As your Agnelli story reminds us, not everything we wear is a fashion statement. One of my high school English teachers--a cute little thing from the U. of Washington--had to bandage her wrist in order to wear her gold graduation watch. (The things one remembers&#33 Mike
Actually the most southern state (which in reality is not considered the south; yeah I don't get it either) Florida (ok, south Florida) has a tradition of rather flamboyant colors (tropical would the "˜proper' way to describe the whole scene). It's primarily pastels, yellow, and the like in Miami (read: South Beach), whilst Palm Beach tends towards white and pink with navy blue somewhere in there. Every other thing in-between geographically is an amalgam of the two styles, which intertwine onto themselves anyways. It's not uncommon to see a man in Palm Beach wearing a navy blue sports coat with a pink cutaway shirt, a knitted tie, white trousers, black oxfords and pink socks (trust me the pink socks are very cool in Palm Beach, everywhere else, though...). Of, course as I write this I must state that I have no pink shirts yet... Jon.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
It's not uncommon to see a man in Palm Beach wearing a navy blue sports coat with a pink cutaway shirt, a knitted tie, white trousers, black oxfords and pink socks (trust me the pink socks are very cool in Palm Beach, everywhere else, though...).
I saw my grandfather a few weeks ago and he was wearing this exact get-up, minus the pink socks. It suits him being that he is indeed my grandfather, but I personally dislike any combining of a navy jacket (suit or otherwise) with black oxfords. It looks too much like Marine corps attire.
post #25 of 31
faustian bargain-- I like your point about making the most of our limitations.  In another context (a discussion of "personal style"), Ask Andy forum members seemed to agree that our style decisions need to reflect not only body type, coloring, age, and so forth, but character and values as well.  And for none of us is every single one of these attributes conventionally positive.  (Not even for someone like Cary Grant, who once plaintively exclaimed, "I'd like to be Cary Grant, too.") Just think of Jimmy Durante and Bob Hope with their outsized noses; or the raspy voices of Miles Davis and Louis Armstrong; or FDR and Winston Churchill and their nicotine dependency. . . . All made memorable use of their "limitations."  Indeed, Roosevelt's cigarette holder, always held at a jaunty angle, became a potent symbol of his irrepressible character.  Davis, one of the best dressed men of the mid-twentieth century, presented a seamless surface--equally subdued in voice, trumpet tone, and quintessential Italian silk suits.   Agnelli's innovations (and there were several, including a penchant to display both watch and tie outside his sweater) no doubt mirror significant personal qualities. And I am convinced that the Duke of Windsor's "cacophonous melanges" (great phrase.) were a muted protest against the rigid role that had been thrust upon him--and that he cast off at the earliest opportunity. Yes, indeed.  The "dashing path" can lead to benefits beyond price. Regards, Mike
post #26 of 31
Quote:
there probably aren't that many forumers who grew up in the '50's...for example i grew up in the '80's, when new wave, preppy, punk, and proto-hiphop styles coexisted in a cacophanous melange. also i remember lots of acid-wash jeans. *shudder* that said, i lived in the south, where if you dressed 'gay' you were more likely to get sneered at than propositioned. i remember visiting my old middle school right after i had moved away, and i was wearing a pink buttondown under a navy sweater...some redneck passed me in the hall and audibly snorted. /andrew
In the early 80's I went to a rural high school (20 miles to the nearest 3-color stoplight&#33 and dressed very in a very flamboyant preppy mode that caught a lot of crap from random rednecks, but lots of girls liked the way I dressed (along with the proto hip hop types). I never wore pink socks, but the day I wore orange pants with green topsiders nearly got me killed.
post #27 of 31
Thinking of Thracozaag's picture of Gianni Agnelli's successor unbuttoning his sleeve buttons and buttondown shirt collar in this thread, I came across this professorial article about "dandyism" and the style touches of fashion icons like Astaire and Agnelli. It's interesting reading. http://<a href="http://www.claremont...vanni.html</a> Maybe if you're only Agnelli's imitator in these flourishes (e.g. you live in the Midwest, say, and you do not head up a large, financially distressed auto maker), "style" too easily turns into "affectation". IMO, better to actually be Agnelli or Barbera if you try this.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Quote:
It's not uncommon to see a man in Palm Beach wearing a navy blue sports coat with a pink cutaway shirt, a knitted tie, white trousers, black oxfords and pink socks (trust me the pink socks are very cool in Palm Beach, everywhere else, though...).
I saw my grandfather a few weeks ago and he was wearing this exact get-up, minus the pink socks. It suits him being that he is indeed my grandfather, but I personally dislike any combining of a navy jacket (suit or otherwise) with black oxfords. It looks too much like Marine corps attire.
I personally do like the black oxford look, but you can substitute that for brown oxfords if you like (or brown suede oxfords for that matter; ah, hell you could even have a really nice pair of boat shoes on...ok, maybe I went too far). Jon.
post #29 of 31
Is this our very own Manton, I wonder?
post #30 of 31
Both Manton's posts and Nicholas Antongiavanni's articles cite Alan Flusser's writings and include an enjoyable historical perspective. Here's another article from Mr. Antongiavanni: http://<a href="http://www.city-jour...coats.html</a> The writing style is similar and Manton has referred to Mr Antongiavanni's writings in prior posts, without fanfare. It may be fun for readers to guess at identities, but less fun for a member who wants his anonymity.
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