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What I've learned from Styleforum (or, a guide to not wasting money / avoid buyers remorse) - Page 3

post #31 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post

while I get that this is sort of a personal preferences threak, some of the pronouncements on here are very bizzarre. A lot of this is really more of a "how to dress like #menswear", which is fine if that is what you are going for but not everyone wants that.

 

I'm going to agree with this.   The OP and thread fits the first part of the thread title well ("WHAT I'VE LEARNED FROM STYLEFORUM") but IMO this collection of personal preferences (some I would agree with) is completely at odds with the second part of the title ("A GUIDE TO NOT WASTING MONEY / AVOID BUYERS REMORSE").    

 

I mean... silk ties are dead, stop buying them?  really?

post #32 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post

I'm going to agree with this.   The OP and thread fits the first part of the thread title well ("WHAT I'VE LEARNED FROM STYLEFORUM") but IMO this collection of personal preferences (some I would agree with) is completely at odds with the second part of the title ("A GUIDE TO NOT WASTING MONEY / AVOID BUYERS REMORSE").    

I mean... silk ties are dead, stop buying them?  really?

My thoughts exactly.

Amazing handwork and buttonholes ultimately mean a lot. But only when the fabric, cut and fit are well done. After the foundation is there, the quality of the details becomes the point of emphasis. This does not diminish the importance of the basics, but that gets lost on many.
post #33 of 84

I've learned many things, including:

Don't be in a rush to build a wardrobe. It's a journey, not a race.

It's better to have 2-3 perfectly fitting suits than 10 that you're not completely satisfied with.

Learn to shine your shoes nicely.  There is no need to own 20+ pairs of shoes (I have failed at this and spend too much extra money money).

The fit of a shirt is much more important than the name on the tag.

Things like pant rise, front style, length, and taper, are extremely important.  Know what works for you.

If you spend a lot of time in casual wear, spend time and money on your casual wardrobe.  I wear my Samurai jeans way more than my suits.

Use sneakers for sports, wear proper footwear like shoes or boots at other times.

Ties, watches, belts, and shoes can make or break your look.  Choose wisely.

Try stuff on.  If it does not fit perfectly or it can't be made perfect, don't buy it.  Something else will come along that is better.

Get yourself in as good of physical shape as possible and try to maintain it.  No piece of clothing can make up for you being overweight, having poor hygiene, etc.

post #34 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Foxx View Post

Point well taken, but obtained this info for another forum member, from the buyer who handles Kiton & sartorio who just returned from another trip to Naples
and if you
believe it
you have lost
the
game
post #35 of 84
Thread Starter 
Ah...well again, I've learned to put far less emphasis on handwork, just posted that in another thread about sartorio, T4. If u have more accurate info to post in that thread about sartorio, hope you'll do so.

My hope in creating this thread was that others would read, take with a grain of salt, definitely my own preferences-- and also contribute from their own (sometimes costly)!misfires. Hopefully, this might save others some money and at least lessen number of things purchased that don't fit or look very good.

I for one wish I had purchased FAR far less silk/ satin neckties. Some are too wide,too shiny, don't go with a variety of shirts and jackets. The textured ties from NMWA and other sources, on the other hand, go with damned near everything in my wardrobe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by T4phage View Post

and if you
believe it
you have lost
the
game
post #36 of 84
Well here's this thread again:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/39123/kiton-what-is-really-inside-lots-of-pics

Really wish pics in the OP still showed.
post #37 of 84
Re:ties, I agree that avoiding the shiny ones is a good idea. But there are lots of non-shiny silks.
post #38 of 84

If by "all silk" you initially meant satin or shiny silk ties, I understand your point well.   But there's a great range of more matte and attractive silk ties out there, from great prints and madders to panama silk, tussah, shantung, etc...

post #39 of 84
On the other side of the tie conversation, I think that using suiting or jacketing fabrics to make ties is a #menswear-driven fad that was always kind of kitschy and will look dated before long.
post #40 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Foxx View Post

Ah...well again, I've learned to put far less emphasis on handwork

Having a suit made by hand is a different thing than "handwork" in the sense of pretty buttonholes or decorative pick-stitching.  Beyond any discussion of the intrinsic value of making a suit by hand (I know there are diverging opinions on this forum), if this thread is about not wasting money, then I think it is somewhat relevant to understand what one is paying for.  What justifies a $4k tag for a suit?  If one is looking at it from a retail/cost ratio (am I paying for highly skilled labor and fine materials or am I paying for marketing and markups), then one should learn to differentiate a handmade suit from a machine-made suit - not because one should be bought and the other one not, but at least because it helps understand what one is paying for.   

post #41 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by bourbonbasted View Post

I don't really think there is any way to avoid "bad purchases" or "buyer's remorse." You can only be completely sure of your purchases and decisions once you decide what REALLY matters to you. And, unfortunately, the only way (I know) of accomplishing that is through trial and error.

Anyone who has spent any amount of time around clothes will be the first to tell you there is no such thing as the perfect fit, or the perfect garment, or the perfect "outfit." When you get down to nuts and bolts there are always areas to improve upon. So, to avoid chasing the dragon, I suggest figuring out what matters most.

If it's "fit," then focus on what aspects of fit immediately stand out to you -- shoulder expression, drape, back, balance, buttoning point, etc. Once you figure out where your eye looks first, you can go from there, with each iteration (rather it be alterations to RTW or MTM or bespoke) improving upon an area that you truly care about. You start with what matters most to you and then tweak from there.

Others will say fabric is paramount to fit. If you're in that camp then you need to make sure that is the first question that crosses your mind. Are you a "hand-finishing" fetishist? If so, then best to know which makers/tailors are going to show you the shoulder balls. And so on, and so on.

The point is that there will always be a bunch of high-level guidelines or bits of advice. However, especially for someone starting out, not understanding why these bits are advisable makes them more or less useless. And beyond that they actually open the door to wasting more money or time because they're going off of the advice of someone else's endeavors. It leads to people obsessing over every detail of fit only to realize their suit is made of sandpaper or spending years hunting down the perfect cashmere blend only to realize a readily available one would have been all they really needed.

While I like the spirit of the thread, I think the takeaway should be, "Take a more studied approach to dressing." Rather than "5 Weird Tricks to get 6-Pack Abs."

+1

post #42 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Foxx View Post

• ties that are all silk or have a smooth finish are dead, stop buying them. Stop buying ties at outlet stores, they don't look good on you. Truly great ties have wool and or linen in them, soft texture not smooth and NOT satiny. Great ties come from places like Vanda, NMWA, Viola, Sam Hober, and skilled Italian tailor shops-- not department stores.

Que the fuck? Credibility anihilated.

That some ties are nice/interesting doesn't mean that others aren't. Silk ties aren't and never will be "dead."
post #43 of 84
Not sure if I learned this here, but something that @Manton and I have debated from day 1: Know history, but don't feel bound by it.

And of course, have fun. Don't worry too much about making mistakes. It's going to happen anyway. This will free you up to really go for it. This way, when you get it right, you'll really get it really right. Two of my favorite dressers, @Parker and @gdl203 developed their very high taste levels by being omnivorous.
post #44 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal_1 View Post

* Unfunded liabilities - much better to buy cloth than spend 5x more on finished garments before you are ready to have it done right. Better to acquire the hard to find fabrics when you find them than lament losing them for years later. The next recession that's around the corner is going to be worse than the last, and endure much longer than the 2008 recession, mostly because of the Trillion dollar piles of debt building up in the world (US, China, Japan, Europe) is a ticking time bomb waiting to go off. The cloth industry will look a lot different in 2-3 years time than it does today, so grab the good stuff while you can before it's lost. Word to the wise.

This school of thought is for the cloth hobbyists/fetishists.

Any recession that has an "other end" where people still wear suits is not going to thoroughly destroy the clothing industry. Companies may go bankrupt but the means of production will not be destroyed. High quality cloth will still be made. You don't need to buy it now.

If you're referring to the pursuit of old fabrics (that are no longer made), that is deep into hobby/fetish territory and not something anyone who wants to look good needs to concern themselves with at all. 99% of the value with these is in the eye of the beholder.
post #45 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by turkoftheplains View Post
 

100% silk ties are most assuredly not dead-- silk knits, grenadines, and soporific neats are nearly universally adored here. Madders, repps, pindots, and wedding ties can all be quite tasteful as well. In the aggregate there are probably more 100% silk ties around here than any other material. Matte (or low-sheen) finish and texture (along with non-awful color/pattern choices) are the keys to making it work. For a city suit, silk is far and away the safest (and ususally the best) choice.

 

Wool and linen ties can be great, but don't have as broad a range of usefulness as silk, because they're more rustic/casual and more seasonal. These can both be advantages, too.

 

If you're talking about shiny silk satin ties of the Donald Trump style then, yes, kill them with fire.


+1

I have wasted a lot of money on both shiny silk ties, and blends. The blends look great, and it's much easier to get good-looking blends for cheap, but they do not work with CBD/city suits. Cheap, shiny silk ties look terrible, and this makes it difficult to buy 100% silk ties online, because a tie will often look matte in online photos, but be flimsy and shiny when it arrives in the mail. I am currently going out of my mind trying to find affordable, non-shiny silk ties. Since silk ties start at $10, I figured there must be some cheap, quality silk ties out there somewhere, but I am starting to doubt that. I should do a buyer's remorse review of all of my shitty ties.

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