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Untucked shirttails

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
An article in today's NY Times explains the phenomenon of untucked shirts, and how this look has become quite fashionable.  Any thoughts on whether (1) it's a good look; and (2) it will last? July 20, 2004 Flying Shirttails, the New Pennants of Rebellion By GUY TREBAY Daniel Peres is a slob, and that is meant in the nicest possible way. The editor in chief of the men's magazine Details, Mr. Peres is living proof that casual Friday never really disappeared. He is the sort who wears Converse All Stars with his rumpled Helmut Lang suits and keeps his hair combed in a postnap tousle that is no cinch to achieve. Mr. Peres makes no claims to style paragon status, but in one way, at least, he is at the vanguard of what looks like a trend. He almost never tucks in his shirt. "Day, night, all situations, it's out," he said. "O.K., maybe for a funeral I would tuck." This may be remembered as the summer when new sartorial frontiers in the workplace were definitively breached - and in a manner destined to agitate bosses and parents everywhere. Men are letting their shirttails wave, a fact true not just of polo shirts or square-cut tropical styles designed to be worn outside of trousers but of broadcloth dress shirts with tapered tails never meant to see light of day. Draped over khakis or jeans or expensive dress pants, the tails-out look appears to be the default for a generation still searching for a middle ground between the traditional coat-and-tie uniform for the workplace and the Internet-era alternative of outfits best suited for mowing the lawn. And, although retailers insist that the style is pitched mainly toward the young, the trend has obvious benefits for male Baby Boomers forced to confront, conceal and, if possible, flatter what an advertisement for women's undergarments used to term "midriff bulge." Employers may have pushed back the casual Friday look of a decade ago, concerned that sloppy dress correlated with shoddy output, but the march of casualization is not so easily stopped. Influenced, perhaps, by the crisp Latin American guayabera or by the adolescent ease of urban hip-hop clothes, the untucked dress shirt may not yet have made inroads at law offices or financial institutions. But the style is well-entrenched in Hollywood executive cadres - at the lineup on stage at a screening of the Harry Potter movie in New York last month nearly all sported the look - and among influential fashion types....... Full article is here.
post #2 of 11
...i guess i'm going to have to start tucking my shirts in again...
post #3 of 11
Taliesin, An off topic question - is your name in reference to the masterpiece created by Frank Lloyd Wright?
post #4 of 11
That "half-tuck" is certainly the stuff of nightmares.
post #5 of 11
The front page photo of the actor wearing a suit and sporting that untucked look looked ridiculous. He looked like he'd just got out of a bar fight.
post #6 of 11
Hmmm.... Well I wear untucked shirts with jeans and occasionally with jeans and a sportcoat or a soft jacket. But with a suit? Not me. And tucked in front, loose in back... So according to the article, what does that make me, a square, or a rebel? Perhaps a square rebel. Good thing I don't care
post #7 of 11
Another thing - if you are going to leave your shirt untucked shouldn't you roll the sleeves up? Looks sort of funny to me to see them down and buttoned.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Another thing - if you are going to leave your shirt untucked shouldn't you roll the sleeves up? Looks sort of funny to me to see them down and buttoned.
Down here in New Zealand, the most common I see are French cuff shirts worn untucked with cufflinks . and also with Jeans. I actually happen to quite like that look. It looks smart. Cheers Stuarts8
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Taliesin, An off topic question - is your name in reference to the masterpiece created by Frank Lloyd Wright?
No.  I admire the FLW building, but the name is in reference to a Welsh poet.  I spent my junior year abroad at the University of Wales, and more than a decade later still think very fondly of the time, the place and the Welsh people. Also, "Taliesin" is easier to spell than, say, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Hmmm.... Well I wear untucked shirts with jeans and occasionally with jeans and a sportcoat or a soft jacket. But with a suit? Not me. And tucked in front, loose in back... So according to the article, what does that make me, a square, or a rebel? Perhaps a square rebel. Good thing I don't care
Hear. Hear. Three cheers for the Square Rebels. Jon.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Quote:
(VersaceMan @ 20 July 2004, 6:57) Taliesin, An off topic question - is your name in reference to the masterpiece created by Frank Lloyd Wright?
No.  I admire the FLW building, but the name is in reference to a Welsh poet.  I spent my junior year abroad at the University of Wales, and more than a decade later still think very fondly of the time, the place and the Welsh people. Also, "Taliesin" is easier to spell than, say, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch.
Okay, I figured it might be a stretch, but thought I'd ask anyway.
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